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1925 Maxwell/Chrysler intake/exhaust manifold question


Max4Me
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I have been working on my car for a bit and had to pull the intake/exhaust manifolds. There is a tremendous amount of carbon blow-by on the gasket for the end two exhaust ports. The manifolds were simply bolted onto the gasket/block with the tube flanges pressing against the gasket. However, I notice on both the exhaust and intake tubes of the manifolds there are recesses about an eighth inch deep with matching recesses in the block. Was there originally some type of spacer that fit into those recesses to connect the manifolds to the block? Half inch exhaust tubing fits perfectly. By design or coincidence?

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Thanks for the response, Howard. That looks pretty much identical to what I have. Someone did mention ferrules but not clear if it was for that Plymouth. I, too, thought about a possible issue with heating expansion if I used a sleeve. I also ordered a Remflex gasket because bottom of the section that bolts to the intake manifold is corroded. Machine shop would not surface it because the surface was thin. Shop owner speculated it had been surfaced previously. So, back to the question, was there originally a sleeve or ferrule or whatever between the manifold and the block? Do I dare use the steel exhaust tubing to make sleeves. Obviously I'd make them slightly shorter so if they expanded lengthwise it wouldn't put stress on the manifold (I doubt it would crack the block). Thoughts are appreciated!

 

Dave

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Possible solution. On another forum, someone mentioned Model T "gland" rings that do exactly what I thought was needed. There is a big Model T warehouse near me so I checked. Unfortunately the rings are only 1 3/8" and I need 1 1/2. I did acquire 1 1/2 steel exhaust tubing so I'm thinking of making my own. The model T rings have a slit in them to allow for expansion, so I can do that as well. Fingers crossed!

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They are the same thing as model T glands in function but not in size.  I had to machine my own rings.  And from there I had to make them again because they were different sizes from each other, and the head holes may be a different size from the manifold.  Theyre not difficult but require a lathe and some careful measuring.  I made mine a snug fit, tapped in with a rubber mallet.  I think i had to hand fit them with a file and a dremel to lightly loosen things up enough for a clean insertion.  Absolutely test fit everything before bolting it all down with the rings if they are snug because you dont want to crack the spindly cast iron manifold octopus.  If theyre too tight or misaligned checkagain and again, or make a ring looser.  I cut the manifold gasket out of high temp gasket sheet from napa as rings on each port, closely fit on the gland rings which held the gaskets in place for assembly.  I put copper silicone on both gasket surfaces to be safe and as a check to make sure the manifold actually pressed down fully.  No leaks yet, but Im still just test running.

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MaxwellFox, thanks for the advice. As I mentioned I did find 1 1/2" exhaust tubing and it already fits snugly in the manifolds and the block. I am in the process of determining the correct length so the rings won't prevent the manifold flanges from tightening enough against the Reflex gasket to make a good seal.

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I just did (depth of the holes in the head + depth of holes in the manifold + thickness of the gasket material)- .020" or .030” to allow for sloppiness.  I dont see the length as being absolutely critical as long as its seating into both ends to mostly seal and direct the gases through the pipes.  So not too short that they fall out of the seats, but not too long to prevent bolting down.

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4 hours ago, MaxwellFox said:

I just did (depth of the holes in the head + depth of holes in the manifold + thickness of the gasket material)- .020" or .030” to allow for sloppiness.  I dont see the length as being absolutely critical as long as its seating into both ends to mostly seal and direct the gases through the pipes.  So not too short that they fall out of the seats, but not too long to prevent bolting down.

 

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Whatever works, its really a matter of carefully looking at whats in your hands and figuring out what needs to be what size.  My biggest fear was having them too long and having them press out against the manifold when I tightened it down and cracking it so I leaned toward making the rings short.

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