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Last night I dreamt that every car I've seen on the streets or driveways were transformed into horses


Buick35
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There is a book around called something like "The Good Old Day's that weren't" or something like that. It describes New York City during the 1870's thru the early 1900's. It gives the number of horses in the city and the daily poundage of manure produced by each horse. It goes into great detail about how wagon wheels pulverized the manure and the "dust" filled air that people breathed in. That wasn't a dream, it was a nightmare!

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My mother grew up on a farm, and had her own horse for much of her younger years. She often observed that life was not very nice for horses in the early years. Most were merely hardworking "machines" made of flesh and blood, which were constantly overworked and only kept around for as long as they were more useful than the cost of their feed. She told of folks flogging horses again and again to get them to work beyond their capacity...sometimes until the horses died on the spot. Mom always believed that modern machines for transportation and other work were the best things which ever happened to horses. 

 

Oh, and she would get furious watching chase scenes in old western movies...with heroes chasing badmen at full gallop, seemingly for miles and miles and miles (while Dad grumbled about how many times they fired those old 6-shooters without reloading). As a kid, I just enjoyed the movies. LOL

 

 

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31 minutes ago, lump said:

My mother grew up on a farm, and had her own horse for much of her younger years. She often observed that life was not very nice for horses in the early years. Most were merely hardworking "machines" made of flesh and blood, which were constantly overworked and only kept around for as long as they were more useful than the cost of their feed. She told of folks flogging horses again and again to get them to work beyond their capacity...sometimes until the horses died on the spot. Mom always believed that modern machines for transportation and other work were the best things which ever happened to horses. 

She is absolutely correct. The owner's son of one of the farms I bought related the story of his father buying a John Deere tractor and how he shot his work horses that afternoon. I was sickened by that. They didn't think a thing of it. Horses ate. Tractors didn't........Bob

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One night I dreamed I was a wigwam, the next night I dreamed I was a teepee.  My doctor says I’m too tents.

 

I dreamed I was a fixing and painting wrecked cars.  It was an auto body experience.

 

I dreamed I posted silly jokes on AACA…oh wait, I’m awake…

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My 2 comments about the smell of horse manure...  

 

If you really want a treat visit Pure Michigan Mackinaw Island on a hot day.  Nothing like the combined smell of horse S and fudge...

 

We are just far enough out in the country you can smell horse S instead of just hearing it all the time...

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5 hours ago, trimacar said:

One night I dreamed I was a wigwam, the next night I dreamed I was a teepee.  My doctor says I’m too tents.

 

I dreamed I was a fixing and painting wrecked cars.  It was an auto body experience.

 

I dreamed I posted silly jokes on AACA…oh wait, I’m awake…

If you drink tea in your teepee you will pee tea.

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22 hours ago, Buick35 said:

Last night I dreamt that every car I've seen on the streets or driveways were transformed into horses

That could either be a really great dream...or a nightmare. You could end up with a Mustang:

Is the Ford Mustang Mach 1 Coming Back? - The Car Guide

 

 

Or a Colt:

Dodge Colt - Wikipedia

 

😄😄😄

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Just a final depressing note on horses. In the book "Ads that put America on Wheels" the author relates that Clay McShane, author of "Down the Asphalt Path"  reported that in 1880 NYC had to dispose of 15,000 dead horses. They would often die of old age or overexertion, causing huge traffic jams. The corpses often wouldn't be moved for days, since this was a fairly regular occurrence in major cities. 

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Damn! So I am just back from staying a few months in Mexico visiting some family members (on my husband side) and this town is SO SMALL that the window of my bedroom was looking at the street and every afternoon a lot of people passed by in their horses... that was new to me, a great experience tho, good thing they don't usually just leave their waste behind, so all is good about smell. 

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On 2/8/2022 at 3:56 PM, lump said:

My mother grew up on a farm, and had her own horse for much of her younger years. She often observed that life was not very nice for horses in the early years. Most were merely hardworking "machines" made of flesh and blood, which were constantly overworked and only kept around for as long as they were more useful than the cost of their feed. She told of folks flogging horses again and again to get them to work beyond their capacity...sometimes until the horses died on the spot. Mom always believed that modern machines for transportation and other work were the best things which ever happened to horses. 

 

Oh, and she would get furious watching chase scenes in old western movies...with heroes chasing badmen at full gallop, seemingly for miles and miles and miles (while Dad grumbled about how many times they fired those old 6-shooters without reloading). As a kid, I just enjoyed the movies. LOL

 

 

 

 

Which is part of why history needs to be considered in the context of its own time.

My dad grew up on his grandparent's cattle ranch in Nevada, during the depression. Life was good, but hard. They used horses to pull wagons, buckrakes, and all sorts of work as well as sometimes just transportation. I grew up knowing what the horse's limits were. We often get asked questions when we are out with our antique automobiles, about how people could like the things when they were new. Our cars were so slow, cold, damp in the winter, hot in the summer. I usually answer with some facts about what the cars replaced. Horses for transportation were a whole lot slower, wetter, hotter and smellier than the automobiles that replaced them. People in those days loved their new cars, and truly appreciated the advancing technologies. Unlike most people today that are completely clueless in general.

Yeah, a good horse can run at about 25 mph. For a few minutes. They also trip in gopher holes and break legs doing it (sometimes, and often with disastrous results!). Two miles at that speed and he is done for the day! Although one can relate many stories about greater distances often done, like the Pony Express (which my teachers in school failed to tell me actually only lasted for just about a year!), or town to town races? The average horse rarely could do a full twenty miles in a day. Pulling a light carriage, most horses could do about twelve miles per hour, and only for a short while. Their physiology requires them to eat nearly all day long. Cannot eat and run at the same time. And the more one runs? The more one must eat.

 

I like and very much enjoy riding horses. We had one for awhile, almost twenty years ago. Until he got spooked and threw my wife causing her to break two ribs. 

Oh yeah. That Curved Dash Oldsmobile in 1902 was a fine machine!

Edited by wayne sheldon
I hate leaving typos! (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, JamesR said:

So Paul that's an old photo, I presume. Do you still have the company? And what did you do with the car?

      Sold the car in the mid 1990's, the business in 2000 and retired,

      It was two FWD Dodge Colts cut off behind the doors and welded together with two engines, two transmissions and one brake system with a slave cylinder.

      Two drivers facing opposite directions, each driving.   We had a signal system so the the guy facing the way were going was calling the signals,  The other driver

       kept his foot on the clutch and off the brakes until the the other driver called switch.   Did the greatest K-Turn the crowds ever saw and could crab almost

       side-ways.   When on the street, the rear front was covered with a Black Bra and it was equipped with tail lights.   Somewhere I have some great TV footage.

       The car was built for Ted Holden of Great American Race fame, by Joe Klem of Jupiter Florida.   He also prepared Ted's 35 Chrysler Airflow for 13 Great Races

       and one Peking to Paris Rally.   I navigated  in 9 of Ted's Races but got another navigator to drive the other front of the "Double Ender" on the Grand Prix Track.

 

       

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...
On 3/11/2022 at 9:23 PM, Paul Dobbin said:

i think the gas tank wss compatmentalized between the seat backs.    No odor. 

I think that was about 1991 or 1992, the second St. Petersburg Grand Prix for Indy cars.

Woah, if no odor then it really was a good designed back then, I was assuming the gas tap would be at the other side of the car (which would have explained why they chose to show us the side we're seeing in the photo) or it was hidden under the car, which wouldn't make much sense now that I think about it cuz then you'd be against gravity every time you are fueling 🙂

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  • Peter Gariepy changed the title to Last night I dreamt that every car I've seen on the streets or driveways were transformed into horses

Maybe you horse fans can answer a question that I have wondered about for years. How much of a load can a horse pull? In other words, how much freight in a wagon pulled by one horse, or two, or four?

 

To put this in context I am trying to compare the cost of transportation of horse and wagon, railroad, canal barge, and sailing ship.

 

Here is what got me thinking about this. From Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith published in 1776. He says it costs the same to ship a ton of goods 100 miles by wagon in England or 10,000 miles by ship to Trincomalee the Indian sea port. This to me is important information that would influence trade, shipping, cost of imported goods etc.

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I heard a teamster (I guess thats what they were called) in Williamsburg a couple of years ago answering a question regarding the horses 'pulling' the wagons. His response was with the collar properly fitted a horse actually 'pushes' the wagon.

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