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Canadian Built Cars


TAKerry
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A lot of small "assembled" car manufactures.  I think almost any town or city or size had someone who tried their hand in the car business.  This one is from my hometown Woodstock Automobile:

 

Woodstock Automobile Manufacturing Company Limited (1911 – 1913)

This company built the Every Day car and the Oxford truck. The car cost $650 for a runabout, $750 for a 4 passenger car. The Oxford truck cost $750. The total production of cars is not known, but they produced 33 trucks. . . . The car was a 16 horsepower with a maximum speed of 25 mph. It was a high-wheeled car. The car/truck design was of U.S. origin – the Clark Automobile Co. of Michigan. The factory was located at the corner of Mill and Main streets. . . . the Woodstock Automobile Mfg. Co. Ltd. evolved into the Oxford Garage [starting in 1916 at 333 Dundas Street], a major automobile distributor for many years. "
Woodstock Automobile actually began operations in 1904, ‘in the old tannery building’ on Main . Charles Evans was in charge of the works and William Myers was office superintendent. With a staff of 25 me n, in its early days Woodstock Automobile Ltd. made all the parts needed and then assembled them into one and two-seater autos. These it shipped to Hamilton, and presumably also to local dealers. In 1904, its 2-seater, 4-wheeled ‘surrey’ class of automobile retailed for $1400. Another of its products was a truck with chain-driven rear wheels and solid tires.
In the Fall of 1911, the Company moved into a vacant portion of a large furniture factory at the south-east corner of Mill and Main . Claude E. Ferguson was then manager. Both civic and Board Of Trade officials encouraged the company to go ahead with tooling up, promising to do everything possible to ensure that a necessary bylaw would pass without opposition from the local citizens. A few cars were produced at the new site for the 1912 season. However, the bylaw was not presented until after the Civic Election of Jan. 1, 1912. Unfortunately, the bylaw then failed to pass and by mid-1913 the factory was empty, the company defunct.
 
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There was also London Motors, in London, Ontario, the Brock Car in Amherstburg, just outside of Windsor, Ont, off the top of my head there was a company in Stratford, Ont but I don't recall the name, The Chatham Motor Car Company and Gray-Dort in Chatham as well.  Most of these companies produced fewer than 100 cars.  It would be interesting if any still exist aside from the Gray-Dort which there are still examples of.

Edited by 3macboys (see edit history)
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Probably the most successful entirely Canadian designed and built car was the Russell, made in Toronto from 1904 to 1916.  They were a high quality car and for a while used Knight sleeve valve engines.  There is a beautiful 1910 Russell Knight here in Vancouver.  The factory was sold to Willys Overland following WW1.

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1 hour ago, dictator27 said:

Probably the most successful entirely Canadian designed and built car was the Russell, made in Toronto from 1904 to 1916.  They were a high quality car and for a while used Knight sleeve valve engines.  There is a beautiful 1910 Russell Knight here in Vancouver.  The factory was sold to Willys Overland following WW1.

 

Russells were first made by Canada Cycle & Motor Co. (CCM) and the Russell story is a great part of Canadian Automotive history.  I've gathered up all the Russell information I can find (pictures, specs, ads, articles) and made it available on a website:  http://russellcars.ca  If anyone has anything Russell related to contribute, please contact me.

 

There are 5 known Russells still in active use (1906, 1910, 1910, 1911, & 1915) and a handful more complete cars in museums.  And I know of a few more that are hidden away, hopefully not forever.  Below is a picture of my pair, a 1910 Russell-Knight (Daimler Knight engine) and a 1915 Russell Six-30 (Continental engine).  During the five year period from 1910 - 1915 an amazing amount of progress was made throughout the industry.

 

69726875_TwoRussells.jpg.524fcc59345d9e254f590c00a7958c6d.jpg

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Almost every pre - war , Canadian old car person dreams of owning a Russel. Unfortunately survivors are few and far between and rarely appear on the market. Peter is doing a great job of gathering Russel photos and documentation. Not to mention his two terrific cars!

 McLaughlin's in general are not as special , or as truly Canadian as Russel's. Most McLaughlin's are squarely based on U.S. Buick's. There are a small number of McLaughlin cars that are not based on Buick mechanicals but they exist today in very small numbers.

 Early on and up until about 1915 most McLaughlin's had Canadian built; and different from U.S. Buick, bodies. But from 1916 onward they became much closer to a U.S. model Buick. 

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1 hour ago, 1912Staver said:

Almost every pre - war , Canadian old car person dreams of owning a Russel. Unfortunately survivors are few and far between and rarely appear on the market. Peter is doing a great job of gathering Russel photos and documentation. Not to mention his two terrific cars!

 McLaughlin's in general are not as special , or as truly Canadian as Russel's. Most McLaughlin's are squarely based on U.S. Buick's. There are a small number of McLaughlin cars that are not based on Buick mechanicals but they exist today in very small numbers.

 Early on and up until about 1915 most McLaughlin's had Canadian built; and different from U.S. Buick, bodies. But from 1916 onward they became much closer to a U.S. model Buick. 

I agree about the assessment of the McLaughlin-Buick.  It is nowhere near a Canadian designed & engineered car, where the Russell indeed was.  

 

The book, Made Up To A Standard: Thomas Alexander Russell and the Russell Motor Car Company is an excellent history (up until 2002) on the marque.   https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1604983.Made_Up_To_A_Standard  I believe the book is now out of print, and since that time, as a result, more information on Russel has since surfaced.  Hopefully, we will see a reprinted update of this publication.

 

Craig

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1 hour ago, 3macboys said:

Does anyone know if there is a connection between the cars and what became OTACO - Orillia Tudhope Anderson Company - that made the Auto-Trac and Minnitoys?

Check out the Youtube video "A Tale of Otaco" for your answers.  Jim

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5 hours ago, J.H.Boland said:

Tudhopes were built in Orillia. If you can find a copy of "Cars of Canada", it has many examples. Jim

The first Tudhopes were basically a Canadian built McIntyre high wheeler.  After a factory fire in 1909, they rebuilt and came out with their 4 cylinder car in 1911, which was actually an Everitt 30, although it was built entirely in Canada to avoid import tariffs on any parts.    Shown here is a 1911 Tudhope Everitt that belongs to the Burnaby Village Museum.  It was owned by a local tugboat operator and has good history here.  I was looking into buying it when the family decided it should go to the museum instead.  It's still there, but tucked away out of sight.  

 

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22 minutes ago, PFindlay said:

The first Tudhopes were basically a Canadian built McIntyre high wheeler.  After a factory fire in 1909, they rebuilt and came out with their 4 cylinder car in 1911, which was actually an Everitt 30, although it was built entirely in Canada to avoid import tariffs on any parts.    Shown here is a 1911 Tudhope Everitt that belongs to the Burnaby Village Museum.  It was owned by a local tugboat operator and has good history here.  I was looking into buying it when the family decided it should go to the museum instead.  It's still there, but tucked away out of sight.  

 

DSCN2701.JPG.42edf3de9843a8cd0fa18d803a852a25.JPG

 

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It's unfortunate you didn't get it. You may have seen this ad I posted in "Period Images to Relieve the Stress. Nice to see a real one.

1912 Everitt.JPG

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1 hour ago, PFindlay said:

The first Tudhopes were basically a Canadian built McIntyre high wheeler.  After a factory fire in 1909, they rebuilt and came out with their 4 cylinder car in 1911, which was actually an Everitt 30, although it was built entirely in Canada to avoid import tariffs on any parts.    Shown here is a 1911 Tudhope Everitt that belongs to the Burnaby Village Museum.  It was owned by a local tugboat operator and has good history here.  I was looking into buying it when the family decided it should go to the museum instead.  It's still there, but tucked away out of sight.  

 

DSCN2701.JPG.42edf3de9843a8cd0fa18d803a852a25.JPG

 

DSCN2711.JPG.bb954d212f53942ef0af1af9ce4089c3.JPG

 

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The tugboat operator was Charles H Cates (1859-1938).  My brother-in-law is related to the Cates family by marriage and has known about the Everitt for many years.  The family also owned a 1927 Studebaker Big 6 Victoria coupe which is now in Kamloops or Kelowna, BC.

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Regina Saskatchewan factory 

built Chevrolet , Pontiac ( Canadian models)and Oldsmobile 

opened 1928 and closed shortly after due to the Great Depression ….then te opened in 1937 for about 6 years . Also building Buick’s 

and the “ Maple Leaf truck”
I have several Regina made GMs and the serial number plates have “ Regina” stamped on them .

 

D39526BD-A94E-4DE3-AE5F-7DF726AAC1ED.jpegThe building still exists 

Edited by arcticbuicks (see edit history)
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“Maple Leaf truck “ 

built in Regina

was built as more fancy truck as people coming through the depression couldn’t afford a car and a truck .

the truck had a lot of chrome , leather coloured seat , wood grain dash , 5 bolt wheels , chrome bumper with nice dip in the Center, open driveshaft not torque tube ……just name a few 

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6D5F1EB8-FBDE-498E-9704-A1A94882098B.jpeg

Edited by arcticbuicks (see edit history)
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8 minutes ago, arcticbuicks said:

Regina Saskatchewan factory 

built Chevrolet , Pontiac ( Canadian models)and Oldsmobile 

opened 1928 and closed shortly after due to the Great Depression ….then te opened in 1937 for about 6 years . Also building Buick’s 

For those interested, I believe the Canadian Automotive Museum will be doing a Zoom presentation on the Regina GM factory in one of their upcoming "Third Thursday" sessions.  March 17, I believe.  Info on their website.

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Nice ! 
“Elkhorn Museum “ is a hidden gem to most North American car guys ……been there many times …..it went through a period of struggle and almost closed …..it has really come back to life now , it’s on the trans Canada Hwy and easy to get to if travelling cross country , it’s jam packed with non restored originals , and the Moose Jaw museum is not much further down the trans Canada 

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8 minutes ago, Ed Luddy said:

I don't know how many folks remember that the Dodge boy's set up a bicycle plant in Hamilton Ontario Canada (later CCM) before going back to Detroit?

Amazon.com: John and Horace Dodge: Automotive Pioneers eBook : Alef,  Daniel: Kindle Store

Don't forget that John's wife was Canadian

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Here's a few of my Canadian built cars. Not Canada models exclusively only, but built in the frozen tundra anyways! Sorry I cant find my 1929 Oakland pictures.

1968 Pontiac Grande Parisienne 396. Built in Oshawa Ontario Canada.

1966 Studebaker Commander 194 c.i. built in Hamilton Ontario Canada.

1982 Chrysler Imperial Frank Sinatra edition built in Windsor Ontario Canada.

 

mocrs 023.jpg

chrgretcmay16 004.jpg

carhsjun 050.jpg

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2 hours ago, 8E45E said:

As stated, CCM manufactured the Russell Motor Car.

 

After the second world war, many Canadian baby boomers owned a CCM like this one.

07_Russell_02.jpg

iphone1 104.JPG

 

I never had a CCM " muscle bike " when I was young, but a number of friends did.

I do have one of these . A 1939 CCM Road Racer. One step down from a Flyer which was a true track racing bicycle. The road racer was intended as a road going lightweight in the English style. It's a nice bike but a bit too small for me to ride much. 

Vintage CCM | forum | Another Road Racer Question - Top Tube Angle

 

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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