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auto sleuths - expect to be stumped


a griffin
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I've found this ad for a car that I can find no other reference about. 

Between 0% and 0%, what are the chances of identifying the make of this car?

 

 

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No that exact body removed from the chassis ,was for sale 8-9 years ago. Maybe on AACA. It’s a Pierce Arrow body. Was for sale in Texas for 4,500. I missed it and lost the contact info. Wanted to make a bar out of it in my 1940 gas station man cave. Sorry it’s hard to Stump

AaCA members! George Albright Ocala Florida 

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Most major cities in the east had companies that converted standard five and seven passenger sedans into invalid coaches. It was a common modification back in the day. With or without wheel chairs. Usually you saw cars on chassis of greater than 140 inches. Door and openings would be enlarged. It was also common for the company to rent cars by the week or month....as well as offering a “car service.” 

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In England an invalid owner had a new 1929 Lincoln limousine converted when new - the trunk rack at the rear was removed and a door neatly cut into the body area around the rear window. This enabled more convenient entry/exit . A friend bought the car in the early 1960s and owned it for years. he had a rear seat frame made out of wood and fashioned a rear seat cushion so it would be as close to the way Lincoln made it new. In the early 1970s I saw a 1927 Lincoln sedan parts car that Austin Clark had in a garage up at the SW front corner of his car museum in Southampton. that garage was separate from the museum buildings. He had that car as a "spares" source for his 1929  Lincoln dual cowl phaeton. The "parts" car had the rear seat springs! SO I bought those from Austin telling him where they were planed to go, and bundled them up and paid extra to have them as extra baggage/carry on luggage when I went to England on a vacation trip. My friend got his springs for the rear seat and they fit perfectly so he had it all reupholstered and they are still in the back of that car to this day.

Another one of my old car "adventures"  to help a friend make a pre war car complete again . You should have seen the look on the customs agents faces when they saw this wrapped up set of rusty seat springs that were destined for a trip when I was at the airport ...........................still crazy after all these years.

Walt

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The day after the Portland Swap Meet is when those from Canada return with rusty parts they just purchased.  On several occasions after the swap meet, I told the customs agent where I was, and what I bought.  When I point to the rusty or greasy parts in the back of the truck, they just wave me (and the parade of others who have done the same) through, without really even checking it all.  Seems they don't want to get their hands all dirty, and they know the parts are duty-free being over 25 years old.

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
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47 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

Seems they don't want to get their hands all dirty,

Perception. And the border guard sat across from his wife at the dinner telling his wife "I just waved those poor souls on with all the empathy I had".

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1 hour ago, George Albright said:

I just remembered the seller said it came off of a Pierce Arrow chassis and the body included three of the four original fenders in the sale. Nice original pice. Wish I could find it. Sold south west of Houston as I recall 



There was a dealer in Philadelphia who specialized in converting Pierce cars into invalid and armored cars. They operated from 1929 to 1937.

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3 hours ago, edinmass said:

There was a dealer in Philadelphia who specialized in converting Pierce cars into invalid and armored cars. They operated from 1929 to 1937.

Makes sense from a years perspective given that would probably be the age a lot of vets would be starting to have enough money to buy a new car (at least until the depression)

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8 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

Perception. And the border guard sat across from his wife at the dinner telling his wife "I just waved those poor souls on with all the empathy I had".

Absolutely its 'perception'   

 

Us 'poor souls' are in the wallet after after our trip to Portland, plus the dollar exchange.  But nothing compares to just how materially 'rich' you became actually finding that rare and almost unobtainable part to complete your project!!🤑

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