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Hans1965
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In my 49 Super convertible was a brass float. Cannot imagine they switched back to cork for 52. Or in the 49 it has been replaced overtime.

But the way it was fixed to the sender unit looks very improvised. 

So you are saying, the cork float was standard for many years? That's really surprising me. Mine looked bad and is not really 100% intact. What's the sense to use material that can easily block the gas line.... 

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1952 should be brass for sure. I don't recall what year Buick stopped using corks. They are fairly common. Originally they were sealed in shellac I think. Today something alcohol-proof must be used to seal them. Shedding cork really hasn't been an issue, but fuel saturation often has. Some carburetor floats were cork as recently as the 1930s (Marvel).

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1 hour ago, Bloo said:

1952 should be brass for sure. I don't recall what year Buick stopped using corks. They are fairly common. Originally they were sealed in shellac I think. Today something alcohol-proof must be used to seal them. Shedding cork really hasn't been an issue, but fuel saturation often has. Some carburetor floats were cork as recently as the 1930s (Marvel).

Tillotson (small engine carburetors) continued to use cork floats on some models well into the 1950's.

 

I have found nothing that would adhere to floats AFTER they had been in gasoline.

 

POR-15, or the dope used on model airplane fabric may be used to seal floats PRIOR to being placed in gasoline.

 

As Bloo stated, orange shellac was used on many early floats. Ethanol will cut orange shellac like a hot knife slices through butter.

 

Jon.

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