Jump to content

1933 Oldsmobile Build


Recommended Posts

Beautiful car! So stylish! Best wishes on your project.

 

Be sure to also post your progress in the "Our Cars and Restoration Projects" forum on this site, if you haven't already. There's a faithful contingent of people who not only follow these projects, but also are able to provide assistance with specific issues, as well as general guidance. I've learned a lot over there. Be warned though...they like pictures! 😄

 

Our Cars & Restoration Projects - Antique Automobile Club of America - Discussion Forums

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Over fifty years ago, in a junkyard that still held 1930's cars, I encountered what I later figured out was a 1933 Oldsmobile.  All the emblems and nameplates were gone, it was terribly weathered as were all the cars there.   I've seen one, maybe two, in the intervening years.  Good luck with your project, it's a real rarity now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So so far i have done a bit of work on the car i've been working on sourcing wood i would say 98 percent is there and 40 percent is useable the real roof stuff is of course the roof and the wood under all the windows is varying. The only sheet metal that needs replaced are the running boards and the floors 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah absolutely! I mean its all there the brakes even worked when i was pulling it up on the trailer. They need adjusted.. badly.. lol but i was still surprised they did anything! I got the motor turning over it shifts through the gears. So im not gonna do a crazy restoration on it. Its wven gpt the orginal paint so im gonna do very very little body work on it. Get it running reliably and put the interor togther then just drive and enjoy it!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It even has this cool key chain on it that says 1939 Worlds Fair and it has a matching license plate stamped in the back so the plate is at least orginal tp 1939 which is pretty crazy! Even had tools in the tool box and a jack. All trim and badges are there km missing so little its insane ive never been so lucky to find a car this complete and unmolested!

20211114_092541.jpg

20211114_092628.jpg

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, ManualOldsOnly said:

It even has this cool key chain on it that says 1939 Worlds Fair and it has a matching license plate stamped in the back so the plate is at least orginal tp 1939 which is pretty crazy! Even had tools in the tool box and a jack. All trim and badges are there km missing so little its insane ive never been so lucky to find a car this complete and unmolested!

 

 

 

   That's neat! FYI the blue plate configuration in CT only started in '56 or '57 so the actual plate doesn't go back to '39 but the numbers/letters do (earlier plates were more square and black on silver and other configurations). The slots around the sticker were for an annual metal year plate to be fitted in the corner. When it became cheaper to manufacture modern stickers then they were then applied as shown.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

I think that those early artillery wheels are the snazziest of them all. That looks like there might be a mouse nest hanging out of the horn. If that's the case, take a pic of it. You might want that after your Olds is restored. Best of luck!

Yes! I have already pulled all the rats nests I've found haha

 

11 hours ago, Graham Man said:

Beautiful cars, this was my friend Steve's L-33 Oldsmobile it was used in the film Public Enemies

Public Enemies" Oldsmobile | 1933 L-33 Sedan. One of the ca… | Flickr

 

image.png.4a97e491c22303e818b1c4469fbaa1b3.png

 

He had a bunch of spare parts that went with the car when he sold it, parts are rare

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wow now that is a beautiful L33 ive been thinking about swapping my F hood ornament for the L. Its so friggen beautiful its ridiculous. 

 

7 hours ago, prewarnut said:

 

   That's neat! FYI the blue plate configuration in CT only started in '56 or '57 so the actual plate doesn't go back to '39 but the numbers/letters do (earlier plates were more square and black on silver and other configurations). The slots around the sticker were for an annual metal year plate to be fitted in the corner. When it became cheaper to manufacture modern stickers then they were then applied as shown.

That is good to know! I was wondering that. I noticed the stickers in place of the metal tags. I wonder if the orgianl owner had to swap plates to a newer style in order to use the metal tags. Be prerry neat to find the orgianl plate also probably impossible lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

I'll also add that there is some stylish farmer welding on the one fender. Save a photo of that as well. All of those distinguishing features will be nice to have documented in the future.

......careful,  in today's politically correct world I might take exception to that comment!

But probably not,  you need thick skin to be a farmer.

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So the wood in this car is really not all too awful the stuff that absolutely needs replaced is what i would expect (like the roof) other soft wood places would be under windows. Other then that it looks all pretty damn good. So ill just try to treat and save as much as i can. The roof will definitely need replaced and sadly thats where most of my wood is missing. Everything else i have plenty to pattern. 20211128_142337.jpg.6a076ac58d56eecd68633731bb35b849.jpg20211128_142352.jpg.b8c9dca5b33aa31073c620458ee6f0d7.jpg20211213_185745.jpg.69d9fd7f12884666bfe09657f59d5dde.jpg20211213_185748.jpg.e671421350f25390933ef1c11e175a44.jpg

Edited by ManualOldsOnly (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I was looking for a Buick to restore over 3 decades ago I looked at either a 34 or 35.   Lots of wood too,  in hindsight I'm glad I found the all steel 37.   I think the cars with the wood frame bodies would have been way to big a challenge for me.   I respect and admire anyone willing to take on the challenge of restoring those cars.

 

    👇

👉👍👈

    ☝️

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You want to find an new friend that likes wood working, they will get a kick out of trying to reproduce the wood pieces, most likely Ash.  At the least they will point you towards the equipment you will need, lots of used Craftsman equipment on Facebook, so far I found a great table saw (50) band saw (free) and a planer (free, guy just wanted both gone) I have my Grandfather's drill press.  Table belt sander is still on my list...  My Graham looks just like your wood.

 

 

They make a product called wood restorer, it is just resin that soaks into the wood and hardens (all kind of jokes in that statement) works good.

 

This is just one brand, lots of brands out there, my guess is the boat guys sell it in the gallons.  When you start applying it you want to put plenty on to soak in as deep as possible.

 

image.png.dd42fd7d69021735aff7ffe639309101.png

This looks much more professional, for big jobs...

image.png.406b69970bf382cc37a5febff547693a.png

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Alrighty everyone hope y'all had good holidays whatever you did. I just started back on the 33.

Now that the top end of the motor is done I wanna finish up the cooling system.  I started with the thermostat. Took the housing apart and found all the parts were still there so i just tested the thermostat but putting it in a pot of water and heating it up and to my happiness it's good! So i will just give it a good cleaning and put it back together. Not sure on if ill sand blast and powder coat the housing yet i go back and forth on it.. 

20220107_153838.jpg

20220107_153933.jpg

20220107_154344.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh i just relised i never posted about doing the top end. Ok so the motor was siezed. I soaked it in a cocktail of deepcreek diesel PB and mystery oil for 3 days and got it to turn really nice. I took the head off and found a couple valve stuck. So i pulled all the valves i have one bent one froze and one burnt valve. I replaced 3 exhaust and 2 intake valves with NOS i found on eBay. Now the motor turns great!!!

I of course cut the seats and lapped everything so valves seal nice. Also cleaned up all the valve covers powder coated them black and put new gaskets on them. 

To get the dang bent valve out I had a friend keep adding wrenches as shims while i used a pry bar to slowly pull it out.

The keepers were an absolute pain. I found they had a groove in which i used a rubber band to keep them togther while i slipped the pair onto the valve stem. Then slowly released the compressor until the it held the keepers in place and i had just enough room to remove the the rubber band 

20211211_155037.jpg

20211211_155002.jpg

20211118_202432.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I used an old slab of marble countertop that was once used as a sample to deck the block and the head. Not exactly high tech but it did the job. Used a new copper head gasket. And sealed it all back up! 

You can also see the newly powder coated black valve covers too. I haven't rebuilt the distributor yet just poped it back in so i didn't lose my timing.

 

20211221_185529.jpg

20220107_160238.jpg

Edited by ManualOldsOnly (see edit history)
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I received the wood roof remnants yesterday and today I laid the pieces out and started fitting things together. Pieces that were originally glued and screwed together got screwed back together so I can measure then lay them out on new wood. I had a piece of ash that I had laminated a while back and didn’t use so the front header got clamped down , traced out, cut two half inch dados on the ends, then I cut out the traced lines on the band saw. Finished up the piece on the disk and belt sander to clean it up. Tomorrow I’ll start doing more shaping and inletting.

4B952D7E-3EE9-4F9D-B5F4-8CF083952340.jpeg

DAE986F9-D15D-4120-86D0-3435FC0D5F91.jpeg

7C17F5BD-9FB9-43A9-82E1-B6E6FB0FEC5B.jpeg

0E707359-243E-48CE-8BDB-6B43F0DDB1A8.jpeg

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

More done today. Finished shaping the front roof rail then laminated up a piece for the rear roof bow and drew   It out so it’s read to cut. Made 6 of the seven roof bows and inletted two for the dome light board. I used slightly wider stock for the bows as the originals were only 3/4x3/4”. I used 7/8” stock to help make them a little stouter. Had Bill get me measurements to double check on some dimensions I needed. I thought there was a couple pieces missing and judging by the measurements, I believe I’m correct. Right behind the front roof rail (towards the rear of the roof), there should be what’s called a trim roof bow. There is about 1 3/8 gap between the ends of the roof crown rails and the back edge of the front roof rail. The trim bow should take up some of that space and there also needs another piece screwed to the back of the front roof rail that the roof slats gets nailed to. The rear roof bow also needs the same piece for the rear end of the roof slats to be nailed into. With a majority of the roof wood missing I’ll need to do more research to determine how those front wood pieces are made. Tomorrow I’ll cut out the rear bow and start shaping it up. I will also prepare the wood for crown rails. I have to pull a 4/4” plank of ash down from my garage rafters to make those up. 

FC464D7F-8FAA-46CA-A966-BAFAB511674C.jpeg

E7C9A419-8DE4-4979-B8F3-1A92B1592E5E.jpeg

D914B3AB-29BA-426B-8468-0894B99EB064.jpeg

2A6268FC-CA7E-4BB1-89C7-433083FA529C.jpeg

7DF8444E-6105-4B3C-A7F4-E84D8635A399.jpeg

387FDBC7-D4B1-45EC-ADAD-4C040E9A0566.jpeg

D64A86A9-5402-4CEA-A983-7DECB2079495.jpeg

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Put in a good amount of hours today. Got the rear roof bow finished, the seventh roof bow done, the roof crown rails cut out, sanded, inletted for the bows, and the dome light board made up. Temporary assembled the rails and bows then took some measurements. I purposely made the bows a tad long and will now shorten the tenons on the ends to get the right width. Unlike a chevy, the olds tapers slightly from the rear forward. Still have more routing and hole drilling for the crown rails to do then I’ll start working on the front tack board that fastens to the rear of the front roof rail. Still have to cut the hole for the dome light also. 

5FB4A343-EC04-4C36-B766-5546572DFE8A.jpeg

37458CE0-008C-4CA4-9E88-32DD15E8AB66.jpeg

EAB1C86B-6980-4488-8E7A-AF5D492FCD1A.jpeg

B28FE4AC-1C8F-438E-BC14-B9B5CE26F7E4.jpeg

14FF6C62-BDDB-4AEA-95F8-F4E0940477CC.jpeg

A0BB0E15-6AC2-4BF7-9985-0E63CD5C0447.jpeg

1D54448B-204E-4CC9-8DC4-36D8E24ED7E3.jpeg

42178EF2-5EFC-46BE-A66C-5628C486837B.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Graham Man said:

WOW great work on the 33, the top bows on my Graham have scared me for a long time, you make it look easy!

 

How do you  cut the long arches on the bows?  I was assuming band saw and belt sander?

Yes. Everything gets band sawed out then some disk sanding. I’ve been getting a lot of calls for wood work and have another two more olds to rewood including another 32’ wire wheeled roadster but one of only 13 made in Canada. Because of the uptick in my hobby I just purchased an industrial horizontal belt sander at auction yesterday. It is huge and should allow me to make fast work of the sanding process and allow me to go to a coarser, faster cutting bandsaw blade. It has two tables so one can be left at 90 and the other adjusted to what ever angle I might need on a piece. It also has the ability to sand inside with both a 3” and 6” drum. This machine is almost 8’ long! For what I’m doing it should really help make a difference.

4AB80084-D5C4-452F-A9F4-261E8C21CCD7.png

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was browsing along and thought "wow, your shop looks a lot like @chistech's shop and then noticed it was him posting... which really threw me for a loop.  I guess that's what I get for only looking at the pictures. :)

 

@ManualOldsOnly that's a wonderful looking car, glad you're letting us watch the progress... even if *some* of us can't be bothered to actual read. 

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did a lot of work today. Made up all four corner blocks along with boring out the dome light keyhole. The front corner blocks got milled for the flat steel nut plates and the keyhole in the dome light board got the same treatment to allow the light to mount flush but still have a good amount of wood around the housing for the mounting screws. The tops of each of the two crown rail pieces have a 8.5 degree angle which I set up with a sacrificial backer board as a guide on the table saw. The board controlled the depth of the angled blade along the curved edge of each crown rail piece. With all four pieces done they were assembled and all side mounting and corner block holes drilled. The crown rails got glued and clamped together. All the bottom corners of the bows then the crown rail inside bottom edges got rounded over with the trim router. 
      Made up two plywood copies of the front corner irons using the bolt pattern supplied to me. With the crown rails glued and dry, I counter bored the nut relief and drilled the holes for the mounting bolt at the front of each crown rail where it mounts to the front corner iron. Mounted the front corner blocks to the front of each crown then assembled the two crown rails to all the bows and bolted them to the plywood corner irons. Installed the rear of each crown rail in the dado on the rear roof bow then installed each corner block. Drilled the corner block thru bolts into the crown rails. The ends of each crown rail got a 1/2” wide dado where they go over the rear bow to clear the electro weld seam on the roof metal. Just need to drill the mounting holes for the rear roof bow and make up the front trim bow that fastens to the rear face of the front roof rail and this roof will be done. The space between the front roof rail and the ends of the crown rails is where the trim bow will be mounted.

64E8B7C8-CB95-423B-BBEE-4921044BBE60.jpeg

1499CA9C-6BFA-4713-BDAB-408812F2301A.jpeg

2D830768-FCF9-4E99-A131-012E23BB7764.jpeg

D60E99D6-66DA-439F-A998-B732E90299F2.jpeg

595D5D11-FB56-41B1-9E89-43B4CE0C627D.jpeg

CD49DCA9-7834-4032-B21C-828CB9599B2A.jpeg

ED240A25-7F10-4741-8FF8-5555DECF23BB.jpeg

8FDD7947-9847-4BB3-9A3F-DD1BF9681244.jpeg

57704303-5F05-4E5D-A434-2E28941102A0.jpeg

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...