Jump to content

Eye test


2carb40
 Share

Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, Nichalicious said:

Second word looks like sonomatic.  I can't tell what the first one says

I'm gonna grab a magnifier. I can't read that deteriorated first word with these old eyes! But I think there might be alotta that goin round!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Matt Harwood said:

It's a 1941 Super Sonomatic AM/shortwave radio. Somewhat rare accessory. Most are just the standard Sonomatic AM unit, but the shortwave was an option. Nice find!

Wow! Thanx for quick reply Matt. I type slow, but that was fast! I'll hafta look up in the books what that's all about. Never had one like that. Have you had someone repair one that you can recommend? Same gentleman sold me an NOS bottom stainless for my 1941 Century fender skirts and a nice 1940 Super dash shell with decent woodgraining! Actually got lucky twice as I previously visited Scott Farmington(great guy!)  in Cedar Rapids who sold me some great stuff, small dual carbs and a pair of  'elephant ears' for the 1941 bumper ends(overider prevention) and also a bottom trim for same skirts. Sure is enjoyable finding new Buick friends! Got in the Christmas spirit on the visit seeing this item built up by the makers of stuff pulled by Clysdale. Don't think it's a Buick, but hoping it's enjoyed!

image.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Matt is correct on the identification of this radio. A typical used 1941 Buick radio will cost you $50 or less in unrestored condition. This radio is usually offered at a considerably higher price. The USA was well aware that we were likely to be entering a war soon. The war was the hot topic and having a shortwave radio in your home or car was one way to listen to European stations (and stateside) and keep up with what was going on.

Check the inside of your 1941 Buick Fireball Eight operating manual. There were several versions. If you have is a typical one it will appear that someone has written a message on the inside cover. It will say "For "use of jack" see page 60". Actually the 'use of jack' began on page 59. By the time they came out with the shortwave option the inside cover had two inscriptions: " Suggest you read short wave radio information page 97" and "For "use of jack" see page 59". That correct notation was in the seventh edition of the 1941 Buick Owner's Manual. This is the manual you want to go along with your highly desirable accessory. 

The 1942 Owner's Manual did away with the inscriptions inside the front cover (at least by the second edition, the only one I have) and there is no reference to a shortwave radio.

Super-Sonomatic.JPG

Edited by Roadmaster71
typographical error (see edit history)
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanx very much for those highlights! It's phun stuff to uncover tasty historical tidbits! I'm a big fan of WWII HISTORY. Especially political activity leading up to. Never learned about Franco, Mussolini, and others in depth before documentary's on public television. Well done Ken Burns, huge fan!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Greg, I looked at the two publications that I have, How to get the best out of your 1940 Buick, and there was no mention of the short wave radio for this year. The other book I have is more extensive and was used by Buick salesmen in 1940 titled Buick Facts 1940 and it does not mention the Super Sonomatic either. Not saying that this radio was, or wasn't  available in 1940, just can't find some verification. Nice find.

 

Mike  

Edited by kingrudy (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can only open this pdf link on my computer (not cell phone), but maybe this has some interesting and useful info for you:

oldcarmanualproject.com/manuals/buick/1948-49/group11/group11.pdf

 

Its 38 pages of very cool and interesting radio info for us electrical geeks.

 

I have lots of vacuum tubes if you find you might need something electronic...dont forget to sandpaper clean the tube pins to keep them clean for continuity in their sockets in the radio to ensure the tubes are in best electrical condition.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanx much! Good stuff to learn. I've been doing the 'skinned knuckles' thing since grade school, but electrical had to be 'force fed', as I didn't start early learning, but learned some 'survival' skills switching BIG power in the sub-station at the power plant job I fortunately retired from!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMG_20211210_120113.jpg.40030d81f17800939958faecefd404fd.jpgI'm havin' kindova phun Holiday season!IMG_20211210_125200.jpg.5c81e110dcd453da2ab26042979b6607.jpgIMG_20211209_093814.jpg.413c6a0e1a2403f5fc1d33d429fbcfc4.jpgIMG_20211210_125215.jpg.2d7e88f21a374dac75b7b30e1146d66a.jpghe said  the radiator in the kitchen was 90 seriesIMG_20211210_125105.jpg.e1749bf83921db0ddde5d1a82688e360.jpgIMG_20211210_120050.jpg.5587bcff913a8e1fdae8769060af306a.jpgIMG_20211210_120313.jpg.4b30a93103b7a88e197c16c9df9da150.jpg

On 12/2/2021 at 3:25 PM, Matt Harwood said:

It's a 1941 Super Sonomatic AM/shortwave radio. Somewhat rare accessory. Most are just the standard Sonomatic AM unit, but the shortwave was an option. Nice find!

Went back for seconds yesterday! Photos of a few items...IMG_20211210_120026.jpg.5a25a1ad1ebb8ba9cdfd87a012435abc.jpgIMG_20211209_093814.jpg.413c6a0e1a2403f5fc1d33d429fbcfc4.jpg

Edited by 2carb40 (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...