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How Many HPOF Cars


TAKerry
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We have a 35 Ford Pickup.  Historiic, Original Features, Drivable, but no P according to the Judge.  Rejected!

Also have a 66 VW Beetle, all original with after maket Foxcraft Skirts and several window decals.   ADAC  (German Auto Club) Genuine VW Oil Dripper/,  Rejected!

Also a 81 El Camino Conquista.   I'm the third old man owner since new.  175,000 miles.   I added a color coordinated pin stripe.  Will not get judged.

I support the HPOF Class but think it's to judgemental.   I don't do anything to my cars that I would not have done when brand new.

I also remove dealer added advertisements.

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VW Founders.jpg

el camino .JPG

Edited by Paul Dobbin
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As much as I enjoy viewing the restored cars at Hershey, I find myself spending most of my time looking

at the cars in the HPOF class. Some of the cars are so well preserved, that you question whether they are

actually unrestored. After speaking to some of the owners, I began to realize that some of these cars look so original

due the the meticulous care that the caretakers have taken over the years.

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9 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

Do all the 25 year old cars qualify? How many cars are now qualified for the yellow HPOF oval? 

All AACA eligable cars (25 years old and older) qualify for evaluation in the HPOF class.  I don't know how many cars have been certified, but the HPOF class generally represents about 20% of the cars at an AACA National.  There were over 200 at Hershey this year.

Dave Bowman

AACA HPOF National Committee Chairman

 

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My Father had the chrome done long before unrestored cars were given any recognition, it was pretty ugly prior to that. I had the rims painted and pinstriped. The paint on the nose will never match the body on a true unrestored Chevrolet of this era because the nose was painted at Chevrolet and body was painted at Fisher Body. Sold new at Bayer Chevrolet in Long Island City in NYC

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Edited by John348 (see edit history)
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I had a  1984 Ford E350 Tioga Motorhome I got and HPOF award at Hershey and a HPOF original at Auburn the  next year. The original owners used the Motorhome to vend at Hershey for several years as did I. It was also nice the day I showed it we just left our spot in the red field and moved to the show field and had breakfast while it rained. Great way to do a show in bad weather. By the way I dressed up as cousin Eddie for the Shows.

 

I sold the Tioga and bought a new one a few years ago. I have a 57 Tbird, 66 Impala convertible and 96 Buick Roadmaster I plan try for HPOF in the next few years. All are low mileage original paint etc cars.

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3 hours ago, John348 said:

My Father had the chrome done long before unrestored cars were given any recognition, it was pretty ugly prior to that. I had the rims painted and pinstriped. The paint on the nose will never match the body on a true unrestored Chevrolet of this era because the nose was painted at Chevrolet and body was painted at Fisher Body. Sold new at Bayer Chevrolet in Long Island City in NYC

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...and that mismatched paint is part of what makes original cars like yours so interesting.  There was a story about the Wixom plant where Lincons were built in the 60s.  The story was about the final assembly step, installing the driver's side windshield wiper. This was performed by a long established employee with enough seniority to be untouchable.  He wore a giant belt buckle that scratched every car he worked on. Thus, one could tell if a car was original because there would be evidence of a repair on the driver's side front fender.  This is likely urban legend but a fun story either way. 

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1 hour ago, 1937hd45 said:

Do the early 1910 era cars get parked together or are the just parked along side the 25 year old cars that were never driven? 

At all Nationals other than Hershey the HPOF cars are parked from the earliest to the newest within the award catagory they are seeking. (ie HPOF, HPOF Repeat, HPOF Original, HPOF Original Repeat).  Due to the volume of HPOF cars at Hershey, they are parked in the order they arrive.

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1 hour ago, 61polara said:

At all Nationals other than Hershey the HPOF cars are parked from the earliest to the newest within the award catagory they are seeking. (ie HPOF, HPOF Repeat, HPOF Original, HPOF Original Repeat).  Due to the volume of HPOF cars at Hershey, they are parked in the order they arrive.

Thank you! I haven't been to an AACA National other than Hershey since the 1990's. Seeing a progression of unrestored vehicles must be quite a sight. Bob 

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On 11/28/2021 at 5:42 PM, Paul Dobbin said:

We have a 35 Ford Pickup.  Historiic, Original Features, Drivable, but no P according to the Judge.  Rejected!

Also have a 66 VW Beetle, all original with after maket Foxcraft Skirts and several window decals.   ADAC  (German Auto Club) Genuine VW Oil Dripper/,  Rejected!

Also a 81 El Camino Conquista.   I'm the third old man owner since new.  175,000 miles.   I added a color coordinated pin stripe.  Will not get judged.

I support the HPOF Class but think it's to judgemental.   I don't do anything to my cars that I would not have done when brand new.

I also remove dealer added advertisements.

Cover Shot.jpg

VW Founders.jpg

el camino .JPG

On the 66 VW I can see three things besides the window treatment they could ding you for. How many things can disqualify you?

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Our 1937 Buick 80C Roadmaster Phaeton (Convertible Sedan) has been awarded HPOF and ORIGINAL.

originally sold to New York City as Fiorello LaGuardia's Parade Car, 

it served to open the 1939 New York Worlds Fair with LaGuardia an Franklin D. Roosevelt in the back seat,

and was used in ticker tape parades, also transporting

General (later President) Dwight D. Eisenhower,

Harry S. Truman,

Winston Churchill,

and a host of other dignitaries.

 

The '37 Roadmaster still wears her original convertible top as well as most of the original paint and upholstery, and even the driveline has yet to be opened.

Founders Western PA 2010 1937 Buick 014.jpg

 

Founders Western PA 2010 1937 Buick 015.jpg

 

Founders Western PA 2010 1937 Buick 016.jpg

 

Founders Western PA 2010 1937 Buick 017.jpg

 

Founders Western PA 2010 1937 Buick 018.jpg

 

Founders Western PA 2010 1937 Buick 063.jpg

 

Founders Western PA 2010 1937 Buick 088.jpg

 

1937 Roadmaster on 2021 Founders Tour.jpg

 

1937 Buick on 2021 Founders in West Virginia.gif

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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Our 1988 Corvette has been driven +/- 150,xxx miles and has been awarded her AACA First Junior, Senior, First and Repeat Preservation, 

but is completely and absolutely Unrestored.

I would have to turn in all of her National recognition for her to be judged and awarded the HPOF,

but I'm content to know she is maintained well enough to represent BOTH factions.

We have driven her coast-to-coast-to coast, border-to-border, New Orleans to Burbank to Gettysburg, to Toronto, Alliston, and Kincardine, Ontario, Canada, and transported a Mardi Gras Queen or two (or three), and still enjoy hitting the highway (even 'though there isn't much room for baggage plus Dale's walker). Most things we need along the way are disposable, and there's always a Wal-Mart to resupply.

1988 CORVETTE RIGHT FRONT AT LAKEFRONT.jpg

 

1988 CORVETTE RIGHT AT LAKEFRONT.jpg

 

1988 CORVETTE REAR AT LAKEFRONT.jpg

 

1988 CORVETTE RIGHT REAR AT LAKEFONT.jpg

 

1988 CORVETTE LEFT REAR AT LAKEFRONT.jpg

 

1988 CORVETTE LEFT AT LAKEFRONT.jpg

 

1988 CORVETTE LEFT FRONT AT LAKEFRONT.jpg

Edited by Marty Roth
separate the photos for easier viewing (see edit history)
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Many of these cars just fell to attrition of not fitting in and the owners feeling the need to restore them. My father was hell bent on painting that 53, his health got the best of him and thankfully it never happened. The chrome that was done. I think there are a lot more unrestored cars out there then we think, the early cars as roads and vehicles evolved although totally functional they were not practical, and had not market as used or junk so were just put away, thankfully!  . The newer vehicles just seemed to have gotten consumed, a little more road worthy on the modern roads. Seldom find any every day vehicle 30 years old just into the ground.

Edited by John348 (see edit history)
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15 minutes ago, John348 said:

  My father was hell bent on painting that 53, his health got the best of him and thankfully it never happened. The chrome that was done. I think there are a lot more unrestored cars out there then we think, the early cars as roads and vehicles evolved although totally functional they were not practical, and had not market as used or junk so were just put away, thankfully!  

John, your father's desire to enhance the paint as well as the chrome was not necessarily wrong - he helped preserve and did right in his own sphere.

You have the car - and the memories -

both are more important than HPOF Status, at least in my opinion

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46 minutes ago, Marty Roth said:

John, your father's desire to enhance the paint as well as the chrome was not necessarily wrong - he helped preserve and did right in his own sphere.

You have the car - and the memories -

both are more important than HPOF Status, at least in my opinion

Marty, 

It was at a time in the mid 90's when nobody really appreciated unrestored post-war cars so he felt he needed to paint it. The car was a perfect candidate for a restoration very little body work just a few garage rashes and from the rented garage in The Bronx.  I just was helping my son replace the hood hinge springs this week while I was visiting him. My Dad's Aunt bought it new, I inherited from my Dad, and now my son owns it, so it has had a total of three John R Mahoney's all of which were or are AACA members owning the same car.

Edited by John348 (see edit history)
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I don't enter car shows, but I've been told that my Mercury might be one of those cars. The paint, interior, engine and drive train are all original and have never been removed or taken apart. It has 55,000 miles on it and I paid $2100 for it about fifteen years ago. However, I think the current seat belts, radial tires and aftermarket radiator would keep it from being allowed in that category were I inclined to enter it, which I'm not. FYI, the exhaust tip on the single tail pipe is NOT me trying to be cool😄...it's an extension that really helps exhaust to clear the rear bumper or being drawn into the car. If I could find one that isn't chrome I'd buy it.

 

It's not a perfect car. Not like the cars I see at car shows, but is in good shape. I did drive it from Lincoln, NE down to Manhattan, KS and back a few weeks ago and it made it without a hitch. That was 135 miles each way for a round trip of 270 miles, so I was pleased. My wife and I went down to see the Midwest Dream Car Collection in Manhattan and it was well worth the trip, IMO. I'm told they start the Ferrari up on Saturdays and let folks sit in it. 😉

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Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
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When I bought my '78 GMC Caballero new, I never dreamed that I would still cherish it 43 years later. I'm not familiar with HPOF judging rules but assume that the chrome wheels and topper would be no-nos. It won't likely ever see a judging meet anyway, but it is otherwise original.

1978 GMC Caballero 40 years later 001.JPG

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12 hours ago, Pfeil said:

How many things can disqualify you?

For a 1960 or newer car, six deductions are permitted for the HPOF award, two are permitted for the HPOF Original award.  Cars older than 1960 are permitted a few more deductions.

 

12 hours ago, Pfeil said:

I support the HPOF Class but think it's to judgemental.   I don't do anything to my cars that I would not have done when brand new.

In the HPOF evaluation, each car is evaluated in the same way a car is in class judging except for condition.  As long as the original component is suitable for its intended purpose there is no deduction for condition.  Replacement of belts, hoses and convertible tops with original style parts is permitted as maintenance items.  The vehicle is evaluated based on how the dealer delivered the vehicle, with factory approved accessories.  Deductions can be taken for excessive dirt.

 

Many cars that are rejected are done so because of non-original style parts used as replacements or aftermarket accessories.  The reason for rejection is discussed with the owner and suggest items that can be corrected to possibly receive the HPOF award in the future or a recommendation to move the car to the DPC category.  I'm not certain how this process can be considered too judgmental.

Dave Bowman

AACA National HPOF Chairman

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I know Marty Roth's 1937 black Buick conv. sedan very well. For many many years it resided in a fellows collection about 1 mile north of my house. on the Nassau/Queens county NY border. It is one magnificent automobile!  Although I had been in the car hobby for some years, when I first saw the car he owns when it was here on long island it made me want to own a G.M. 4 door convertible at some point; another friend here also owned a unrestored 1940 Buick Century conv. coupe. that I helped work on ( this was the era that you worked laying on your back under the car and getting a transmission in and out of the Century conv.)

Many years later I was able to purchase a 1940 Roadmaster conv. sedan sight unseen in Ca. that I had a friend look at for me .  My car had a repaint in 1967 along with new top and interior, but the engine has still never been opened up , has never had any major overhaul.

Love this thread, thanks for sharing everyone.

WG

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20 minutes ago, oldcarfudd said:

Heinkel bomber?  Where are/were you?  From the color tones, I presume the first picture was taken quite a while ago, on film.

The photo of the '47 was taken in Anderson, SC at an air show.  This is the Heinkel that crashed a few years later. Yes, it was shot on film and scanned.  The photo of the '60 was taken in New Bern, NC.  I was there for the AACA National.  Both cars have about 60,000 miles on them.

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3 hours ago, 61polara said:

For a 1960 or newer car, six deductions are permitted for the HPOF award, two are permitted for the HPOF Original award.  Cars older than 1960 are permitted a few more deductions.

 

In the HPOF evaluation, each car is evaluated in the same way a car is in class judging except for condition.  As long as the original component is suitable for its intended purpose there is no deduction for condition.  Replacement of belts, hoses and convertible tops with original style parts is permitted as maintenance items.  The vehicle is evaluated based on how the dealer delivered the vehicle, with factory approved accessories.  Deductions can be taken for excessive dirt.

 

Many cars that are rejected are done so because of non-original style parts used as replacements or aftermarket accessories.  The reason for rejection is discussed with the owner and suggest items that can be corrected to possibly receive the HPOF award in the future or a recommendation to move the car to the DPC category.  I'm not certain how this process can be considered too judgmental.

Dave Bowman

AACA National HPOF Chairman

Actually, the second quote was Paul Dobbins, but thank you for the information

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Original owner. 1976 Oldsmobile Omega Brougham. Original Paint and interior, Original complete exhaust including catalytic converter. original P/S pump & s. box, alternator, air pump, fuel pump, spark plug wires, brake master, front calipers, rear wheel cylinders and shoes, original suspension ft & rear. original carburetor-never been rebuilt. Original 3.08 10 bolt posi. original THM350 never been apart. Original paint on engine.  115,000 miles.

CC170-dR-01.jpg

Post Image26-28mpg on 10% ethanol

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12 hours ago, JamesR said:

 The paint, interior, engine and drive train are all original and have never been removed or taken apart.  However, I think the current seat belts, radial tires and aftermarket radiator would keep it from being allowed in that category  

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JamesR,

 

While the radial tires and aluminum radiator would ding your car,

my understanding is that the seat belts, being a bonafide safety item,

if installed in a workman-like manner,

would not be dinged against the car.

Dave Bowman can offer more accurate information on this topic.

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3 hours ago, oldcarfudd said:

Heinkel bomber?  Where are/were you?  From the color tones, I presume the first picture was taken quite a while ago, on film.

The photo of the '47 was taken in Anderson, SC at an air show.  This is the Heinkel that crashed a few years later. Yes, it was shot on film and scanned.  The photo of the '60 was taken in New Bern, NC.  I was there for the AACA National.  Both cars have about 60,000 miles on them.

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I own this unrestored oddity,  it is a 1977 Chevy Monza Mirage I had posted in other threads on our site. Found it through a wanted ad in AACA magazine. My arthritis and it don't get along so well, so it might be looking for a new home this winter.  Here is the photo that I based the purchase on 9 years ago and here it now. It has been certified HPOF twice in the AACA

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Edited by John348 (see edit history)
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