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This Packard was a nice start to the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade....


keiser31
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12 hours ago, alsancle said:

Resto Rod. blah.

 

Gooding Gave away this really well done high quality restoration for something stupid like 140 K.

 

 

https://www.goodingco.com/lot/1933-packard-twelve-1006-individual-custom-all-weather-town-car-landaulet

 

image.jpeg.e05c6b00f21bb153f84e0916b0b7a264.jpeg

 

 

Yeah, I loved that car.  I could see why it didn't bring more than $160k, too formal, worn down resto, etc., but wow, so incredibly grand. 

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8 hours ago, 1935Packard said:

 

Yeah, I loved that car.  I could see why it didn't bring more than $160k, too formal, worn down resto, etc., but wow, so incredibly grand. 


Orin, I got a chance to drive that car, and it was really really nice. I was thinking more like 250 to 275. It had previously sold for 350. Agreed the styling is a little stodgy, but it makes the Macy’s parade car look like a POS.

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1 hour ago, TAKerry said:

Another example why I have decided to stick with 60's-70's cars. I know what they are. This one looks pretty nice to me but obviously I dont have a clue!

Kerry, Always a good idea to do what you know. Unless you’re me and your knowledge is a mile wide and a quarter of an inch deep.

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Kerry, I have the exact opposite issue you do, 60s-70s cars to me are a mass of confusion with all the wires,vacuum tubes, hoses etc under the hood and dashboard all government regulated, adjusted and after 60 years now possibly non functioning . the 1920s-40s cars are so much simpler for me to understand - most of the time, maybe.

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3 hours ago, Walt G said:

Kerry, I have the exact opposite issue you do, 60s-70s cars to me are a mass of confusion with all the wires,vacuum tubes, hoses etc under the hood and dashboard all government regulated, adjusted and after 60 years now possibly non functioning . the 1920s-40s cars are so much simpler for me to understand - most of the time, maybe.

Do you own a car with a Startix?

 

Craig

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The Startix was one of those cute ideas where the idea is to help you do something you don't really need help with that causes more problems then it is worth.    They were installed on lots of higher end cars in the 30s,  Auburn and Cord used them.   Our 53 Caribbean has something similar but you need to press on the gas pedal to make it fire.

 

https://www.studebaker-info.org/Tech/startix/1930startix.pdf

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2 hours ago, alsancle said:

The Startix was one of those cute ideas where the idea is to help you do something you don't really need help with that causes more problems then it is worth.   

The same might also be said for the many semi-automatic, self-shifting, and vacuum-assist transmission devices, including Fluid Drive, Tip-Toe Shift, and Miracle Shift.  Those also require extra maintenance.

 

Craig

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6 hours ago, alsancle said:

The Startix was one of those cute ideas where the idea is to help you do something you don't really need help with that causes more problems then it is worth.    They were installed on lots of higher end cars in the 30s,  Auburn and Cord used them.   Our 53 Caribbean has something similar but you need to press on the gas pedal to make it fire.

 

https://www.studebaker-info.org/Tech/startix/1930startix.pdf

 

 Thank you. Learned something today

 

  Ben

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6 hours ago, Walt G said:

Startix can work well IF it is looked over and not just left on its own to continue to operate after 90+ years.

In order to work well after 90+ years?

I'm just over a decade away from that mark, 

and will likely also need to be looked over and not just left to operate on my own by that time-

hopefully still touring, showing, judging, and aggravating,

but mostly still maintaining and driving my old cars

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I have never owned a car with a Startix. And for the life of me, cannot remember when where what or why I know them from. It was at a very young age for me, likely single digit.

Over fifty years ago, a very good (and still) friend of mine was restoring a 1934 Chevrolet that had one, in very good working condition. When he got the engine back into his car, after painting the whole car, and got it running very nice, one day he said "I bet you can't just get in and start the engine!" Key was in the ignition switch. "Go on, try it!" Somehow, I knew what he had, jumped in the car and fired it right up! A good laugh was had by all, including me, as he stood there dumbfounded.

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About 20 years ago, I drove my Startix-equipped 1936 Pierce 8 sedan to the Mercedes dealer to get a proprietary key made for my now-gone-but-unlamented 1981 MBz 280SL (the Euro version), and I parked at the curb outside the front of the showroom.  As I returned through the showroom to the car, the three idle salesmen (about 35, 50, and 60 years old, each wearing a $1,000 suit and a $100 haircut--value 20 yrs ago--adjust for inflation) followed me out and engaged me in conversation about the Pierce.  I opened the right side of the hood and the two curbside doors for their inspection.  I reached through the front passenger door, ensured that the transmission was in neutral, inserted the key in the center-mounted ignition lock and turned it to the right.  The Startix did its thing: the engine started, silently, on about one-quarter revolution and idled at 500 rpm in utter silence due to the hydraulic lifters.  The guy looking at the engine finally noticed that the fan was turning and asked, "How did you do that?"  Another asked, "Has it been running all this time?"  That led to a discussion of the Magic Startix Box located on the left side of the engine.  I asked, "Will your cars start as quickly and as silently?" 

 

They watched in awe as I then exercised the old chauffeur's trick of a dignified, silent escape from the curb by engaging 1st gear on just the idle and quickly shifting to second, remaining on the idle for 2-3 seconds before applying throttle.

 

That was an afternoon with a lot of smiles on my face....

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