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Is it rare? Does it have value? 31 Nash 880


31nash880
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Purchased a 1931 Nash 880 last year. Hard time finding info as far as production. Know that the person I got ot from had in barn for 20 years. Was in Salisbury NC before that. Old ad states it came from California in 1971. Odd things I have found. Short wheelbase(121 inch) for this model. Sidemounts seem rare. 6 bolt wheels on 6 inch where not used. Was orig. Blue with black fenders. Painted army green inside and out at one point. Twin ignition straight 8 with down draft carb. Any help is appreciated. 

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Standard Catalog if US cars shows it does have a 121''WB on 800 series.  

It also has confusing info on "starting serial number, vs ending serial numbers"  for the 800 series.  It says starting number was 54928, ending at 61757.   a difference of 6829 numbers

 

however the start vs ending number for 800 engine numbers runs from 70124 to 74370.  a difference of 4246 numbers

 

also, Nash did use different wheel bolt patters on the different models of 1932 like my car is, so I would assume 1931 also had different patterns between the different series models too.

 

 

Rare? defining that term is impossible, rarity or low production compared to other makes, does not mean more value on Nash cars.   IMO. An 880 is more "uncommon" than a 870 due to original sales pricing in the depression. And as you should know already, a bigger series is generally more desirable to most buyers. 

 

Sidemounts are not really rare, maybe half the survivors have them. However on my year 1932, all Nash models had metal spare tire covers on all models, both rear or side spares, at no extra cost. Some cars missing them, maybe half I've seen. Buy an 800 sales brochure online to get more info on such things.

 

Pics on NCCA Nash site, all years, so scroll down to 1931 on this page:

http://www.nashcarclub.org/nccaphot/nccaphot.html

 

.

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59 minutes ago, 31nash880 said:

Painted army green inside and out at one point.

Forgot to say that the AACA library should be able to sell you an inexpensive copy of anything they have on file, like paint color charts  These will say what color body, fenders, name of color, etc, on each 1931 model of Nash.  Also ask them for a full list of everything on 31 Nash, they should have tune up specs chart, etc

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Good looking car with nice proportions. 

Rare doesn't mean valuable, surprised no one has commented on the downdraft carb yet.

It doesn't look stock to me but I am nowhere near being a Nash expert. 

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18 minutes ago, alsancle said:

they seem to be made of unobtainium.

One thing I've noticed is that bigger 32-33 Nash cars are out there around the world, but they seem to be rarely posted on the web or in the archives of NCCA since their 1970 founding.  I think if a person wants a 1090 or 1190 or wants to know how many are "known" but hiding, I'd be getting some sort of foot in the door to be able to chat with the 2 biggest 31-33 Nash collectors. One in Pa, the other in France.  

 

6 minutes ago, zepher said:

surprised no one has commented on the downdraft carb yet.

It doesn't look stock to me but

It is stock for that 1931 800 series, pic below from restored car on NCCA; a poor view from opposite side, but it is a downdraft. 

 

I am surprised that nobody commented or spotted the OP's carb in his pic. That is a modern Rochester 2GC.  What is the spider shaped metal line thing near manifolds? Some sort of added Marvel Mystery top end oiler?

 

 

 

 

 

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F&J, thank you for all that info. This is my first car of this era. Have alot to study. 

More car info,

Seems all original

No rust

Good wood

Non original carb but has orig. Downdraft intake

Only mods are holes cut for tube radio.

Plans are preservation restoration at this point. Depends on how engine runs when head reinstalled.

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Neat car. Nash had easy-on-the-eyes styling in the early 1930s. I prefer the switch to a more aerodynamic model such as the 1934 Models styled by a Russian Count. NASH is a survivor that did not go bust in the Depression. Instead they downsized and later became American Motors until they finally could not compete. 

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I agree with Zepher: It is a very good looking car with very nice proportions. It looks like the body is in sound shape. The door gaps all seem quite uniform, indicating the wood frame underneath is probably in good shape.

 

I had a slightly earlier Hudson years ago, and loved it. I always felt that the 8 cylinder Nashes compared very favorably with the Hudsons. Good, solid cars. If you sort it out mechanically, I'll bet it will give you years of pleasure. 

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5 hours ago, F&J said:

I am surprised that nobody commented or spotted the OP's carb in his pic. That is a modern Rochester 2GC.  What is the spider shaped metal line thing near manifolds? Some sort of added Marvel Mystery top end oiler?

 

That is what I was pointing out, the fact that the carb look far more modern than the car is.

I had zero idea if Nash had a downdraft manifold, I was mainly pointing out that the carb didn't look correct.

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Nash did in fact have a downdraft manifold in 1931.

 

The 880 used a Marvel model D? DN? DO?

 

Marvel literature in this period is not consistent. Different references call this carburetor a DO, and a DN.

 

These early Marvel downdraft carbs were used on Nash, Oakland, and Pontiac. I can understand the Oakland model (and probably the Pontiac model) being a DO, and the Nash model being a DN; but Marvel, in some references, also called the Nash version a DO.

 

Like Stromberg, and Carter; the first Marvel downdraft carburetors basically used "updraft technology" on top of the engine. Probaby the nicest compliment one can make about the Marvel (and Carter) is they used this one year only! Stromberg spent 4 years before they obsoleted the updraft on top design.

 

Jon

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Thank you for all this great info. When purchased I was looking for a street rod of this style. I just could not pass on this. Once home found to be to original to cut up. Trying to preserve but finding parts hard to find and expensive. Hope all of you do not get mad at where this is going but I want it to get out and be enjoyed. Crome was all bad so painted with copper. Being stripped and painted semigloss black with no bodyfiller.

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Well, the copper and black may not conform to original but it doesn't look too bad actually.

I think you've found an inexpensive answer to your problem and most importantly, you've not really disturbed the integrity of the original car.  

If a later owner wants to make the car more period authentic, it's only paint. 

Now I'm interested to see the car completed in this color scheme. 

Cheers, Greg

🍸

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Thanks for support on this. Doing my best to retain most stock items. Did find one Nash in Europe this is done in brass instead of crome. Only thing I am trying to find are interior door and window handles. Found repos in Australia but are $180.00 each. Mau have to learn casting aluminum. 

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