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Flywheel resurfacing


Anthon Stout
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20 minutes ago, Anthon Stout said:

I took my 37 Buick’s flywheel to the machine shop to have it resurfaced, he ground the flywheel out to the very edge . Will this effect the function?

If your wheel never had a deeply recessed clutch friction surface, then yes, they normally cut it right out to the edge. 

 

But, some flywheels have a very recessed clutch friction surface with a very raised, thick outer edge.  If that is what yours had, your flywheel is now just lighter. >>> But, if your pressure plate bolts were on top of that raised edge, now the clutch won't bolt on if the tall raised edge is gone..... even if the threaded holes are still there.  I honestly doubt any shop would do that.  (Some recessed wheels have the bolt holes down at the recessed surface, and some have the holes on top of the raised edge).  

 

Lighter wheel will let the engine rev up easier if it was a lot of weight removed, if a small amount removed, you won't ever be able to notice it.  A heavier wheel helps maintain RPM / inertia when the car climbs a very slight short hill without loosing speed as much. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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F&J is on the ball. If the overall surface is flat then the entire face must be machined. My 49 Buick Special flywheel the clutch face is  recessed. When the clutch flywheel face is machined the outer ring must be machined the same amount. If I remember correctly (memory kind of fading at 85 and a half) the bolt holes are on the upper surface. My 28 Dodge brothers flywheel clutch surface is  recessed and very easy to service. The flywheel on my 41 Buick was never machined in all its life because removal was difficult. I felt like putting a bomb in it and blowing it up. In one of my recent threads I described how much work involved in removing it. FRUSTRATING. 

While you have the flywheel out check the ring gear for defects. Also the pilot bearing/bushing should be replaced for the cost of it. 

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F&J nailed it. If the bolts bolted at a different level than the friction surface, then they still need to. The difference between the two needs to be the same as whatever the factory had. If not, then the clamping force will be wrong, and the contact surface for the throw out bearing will be at the wrong height. You might not even be able to assemble it, or the clutch might not disengage.

 

If the two surfaces were different enough from the factory, and they had to take a lot of metal off to flatten it, and you have to take off a bunch more to get the step back, then the whole clutch, including the contact surface for the throwout bearing, will be further away from the fork pivot than it was. If it is a big difference, and the pivot is not adjustable for height, then you may not be able to get the linkage to work right.

 

I have a Pontiac clutch apart right now, and didn't have a setup like F&J described, but it did have a ridge around the outer edge of the flywheel to center the pressure plate (!). What centers the pressure plate on this Buick? If it used a ridge to do that instead of pins or shoulder bolts, it may run out of balance without the ridge.

 

Anthon Stout: We really need more information. What series 37 Buick do you have?

 

@MCHinson @Gary W  @37_Roadmaster_C

 

 

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15 hours ago, trini said:

While you have the flywheel out check the ring gear for defects. Also the pilot bearing/bushing should be replaced for the cost of it. 

 

Generally, I also recommend replacing any seals that are exposed while you have the flywheel off (rear main seal on the crankshaft for example), and any transmission input shaft seal(s) that are exposed and easily replaced while it's apart.  It really sucks to get it put back together and have an old seal leak oil or gear lube all over your brand new clutch and shiny new flywheel. 

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