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What Engine Oil Do You Use?


likeold
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2 hours ago, likeold said:

I went to dump it out there was a bunch of sludge at the bottom

 

I saw something like that with some 50 year-old oil I 'inherited' from my grandfather, but nothing like that with unopened modern oil.  I've used oil that I've had for three or four years without issue.

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13 hours ago, EmTee said:

Hmmm, so 6 quarts is a 'case' now...?

Yep, several brands do this.

 

Oil price still determined by OPEC, not us (or US).

 

https://www.opec.org/opec_web/en/data_graphs/40.htm

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21 hours ago, Terry Wiegand said:

Never ever heard of that happening in my lifetime.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

AACA Life Member #947918

non synthetic oil is not stable and will start to stratify as the ketones separate as does gasoline. Old oil is not recommended. Never ever try to get a motor to run after years of storage without first changing the oil.   

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On 11/15/2021 at 2:24 PM, Terry Wiegand said:

Old engine oil that has been run in an engine and then left to set for decades is a whole different ballgame than new, unused oil in a plastic quart container.  Come on man😪

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

AACA Life Member #947918

https://www.repairsmith.com/i/blog/does-motor-oil-expire/

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1 hour ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

WELL!  Now I need to drain my new oil if I don't drive the car for over a MONTH.?  Not happening.  If you have old oil over five years old, send it my way if it is not wanted.  Where do folks come up with this stuff?

 

  Ben

 

So I put fresh oil and a new filter in my car to store it for the winter and it goes bad over the winter??  I'm with you. Not going to happen.

 

For grins, I will send the link to my daughter who does oil formulation for vehicles for a large oil company and see what she says.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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Well I talked to my daughter and she said that there might be an expiration date on oil, but that is more for cya on the oil company in case someone would do an analysis on a particular bottle of oil and it might not be exact.  Typically a three year date.

 

That said, it is of her opinion that if a bottle of oil has not been opened, and stored at a moderate temperature it would last for quite some time.  It is of her opinion that if you pour it out of the bottle and it is clear, not cloudy the oil is fine. If it is cloudy, discard it.  If it is older oil and clear she would recommend that you shake the bottle before using it.

 

This is not an absolute rule, but one persons opinion which makes sense to me.

 

 

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When the oil is cold it flows slowly because it is thick and viscous.

A 20w-50 is ten times thicker at 40 degrees (the temperature of a hot bath) than it is at working temp

At a typical morning cold start it is nearly 200 times thicker than when hot.

Look at this chart.

 

main-qimg-0139478b52e2db199d7653a0175a716e

You can’t really see it, but the hot viscosity of a 50 weight is around 15–20 CSt

The yellow line shows how thick the ‘20’ part is at the freezing point of water…3000 CSt

The blue line shows where a 5w.xx oil starts from 0 deg c… at around 350 CSt

So a 5w-50 (which I run in my 40 year old motorcycle) is around a tenth the thickness at a cold start compared to a 20w-50, yet offers the same protection when at full temperature.

Cold thick oil flows slowly, cannot flow fast enough to safely get past those hot valves and pistons, and instead, burns into carbon. The moving metal parts then rub together with no protective oil film between them, and massive engine wear is the result.

And that is why engines running on old oils like 20w-50 suffer huge amounts of wear in the first few miles of start up from cold, and suffer oil burning and smoke prematurely.

It’s the ‘cold’ behaviour of the oil, not the hot behaviour that causes issues.

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When I was a teen my best friend's neighbor had a '68 Chrysler that he ran with 20W year-round for exactly the reason you stated (cold start wear).  I remember thinking at the time that he was crazy, as I used straight 40 or 20W-50 in my '56 Chevy.  Today, I realize he was actually on to something...  Today, both my truck and wife's car use 5W-30 and many new cars are calling for 0W-30.  That's why I have been using 10W-30 in my classic cars.

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