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For Sale:  1932 Nash 1080 Advanced 8 Eight Sedan - $10,000 - Syracuse, NY - Project - Not Mine


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For Sale: 1932 Nash 1080 Advanced 8 Eight Sedan - $10,000 - Syracuse, NY - Project

1932 Nash 1080 Advanced 8 Eight Sedan - cars & trucks - by owner -... (craigslist.org)

This car is a nice original example, which was last on the road in 2010.- in 2015 the engine was removed and completely rebuilt, new pistons, new valve train, balanced etc. ($4,500, have receipt) and the carburetor was rebuilt ($500). A new clutch was also installed. The car needs roof wood repair. But is 100% complete with dual side mounts, wire wheels, awesome art-deco dash design. The interior is original and in decent condition. Car is registered and insured in my name. $10k OBO  odometer: 61474
Contact:  Tim  call or text:  (315) 7-two-8-nine-7-four-5

Copy and paste in your email:  78281ec6a53235a386fb2b2a9e15c5e6@sale.craigslist.org


I have no personal interest or stake in the eventual sale of this 1932 Nash 1080 Advanced 8 Eight Sedan - Project.

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Pardon the reminiscence.

The original owner of the 1927 Paige 6-45 my dad bought in 1967 also had a Nash almost identical to this one. He was an old farmer on a small ranch, but must have done alright for himself back in those days. The Paige was not a cheap car, and to buy that huge Nash 8 five years later after the market crash? Until somewhat after the war, he drove the Paige in the winter and most daily use (and it had less than 20,000 original miles!), and he used the Nash only in nice weather. It was, without a doubt, one of the absolute best original cars I have ever seen! Always garage kept,  and well cared for, in 1967 that Nash at 35 years of age still sparkled like new! And it was one of the two late 1920s/early 1930s original paint cars I knew of originally painted two-tone brown/tan. I have seen probably more than a hundred cars that era incorrectly and badly painted those similar colors. And as wrong as I know it is for 99 percent of cars painted those colors, I will always know that there were a few that way back in the era. 

For more than fifty years, I have wondered what ever became of that Nash I saw that day almost 55 years ago (I am sure this is not the same one). I have looked, and watched magazine articles, and advertisements. But never, until tonight, have I seen another 1932 Nash 8 that color!

I think I am glad it is more than 3000 miles away. It is still newer than I really want. And one thing I do NOT need is another project! But a part of me could get interested in that thing if it was a lot closer?

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32 minutes ago, alsfarms said:

Does anyone know if the paperwork matches a 1932 Nash 1080?  Or is it a 1090 with a 1080 engine?

You are correct to question his listing, because on the 1932 Second Series models, a "1080" series would be named the "Special Eight, not the Advanced Eight. 

 

I can see the original body number tag on lower right firewall, contact the seller to see if it says 1080, (the numeral 8 in 1932 means Special Eight, and with the last zero meaning 4dr sedan). (the 10 prefix means second series 1932)

 

My 1932 sales poster with all models and body styles of Second Series, shows that there are 3 different cars in the 90 series.  All three 90 Series Models have different wheelbases.  The Advanced 90 128 WB, the Ambassador 90 with it's standard 133 WB,  and then the longest optional WB, the Ambassador 90 on 142".

  

In 1933 it gets confusing, as Nash downsized and played games with the "model numbers-VS-model names". For that 1933 year, the 80 Series was then re-designated as an "Advanced Eight", (but if this car is a 1933, the prefix would be "11", not 10)

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Thanks, your information does clear up the water a bit for a potential buyer.  I thought it was a Special 8, not the Ambassador 8.  Not that it is a big deal, but as I understand it, the Special 8 is not defined classic by the CCCA whereas the Ambassador 8 is catagorized as a full classic.  Do I have that right?

Al

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14 hours ago, alsfarms said:

Thanks, your information does clear up the water a bit for a potential buyer.  I thought it was a Special 8, not the Ambassador 8.  Not that it is a big deal, but as I understand it, the Special 8 is not defined classic by the CCCA whereas the Ambassador 8 is catagorized as a full classic.  Do I have that right?

Al

The 1932 Special Eight 1080 was the next step down from the Advanced and Ambassador Eights 1090.  The 1080 has a 128" wb, this sedan was priced $1320.  The 1080 straight eight is the 260.8 ci engine that became their top-line engine in 1935 after the larger 298.6/322.0 ci was discontinued at the end of the 1934 model year.  The most direct competitors for the Nash 1080 were the Buick 60, Studebaker Commander 71, REO Flying Cloud 8-21, etc.

 

'32 Nash 1080 sedan -NY '18.jpg

Edited by 58L-Y8
Here's a better look at the 2018 photo: (see edit history)
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4 hours ago, alsfarms said:

the subject automobile of this thread is a beautiful design

Yes, the Second Series 1932 80 and 90 models have stunning "overall" proportions and styling not matched by many other brands, especially in the 4 door sedans and 4 door convertible sedans.  They certainly have that "full classic" look. The 60 and 70 series just lack a bit in overall proportions IMO

 

I hope this car can find a motivated new owner to get it on the road, but I wonder if it will.  It's not about the asking price, it's the reality of the changing auto hobbyist:  >The problem is that those of us who really like these cars are too old and/or have too many cars to buy another that needs work.  People in their 20s to maybe 40's who would have the stamina to restore it, just don't have interest in this era; they may like the looks but would never actually buy one.

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On 10/18/2021 at 8:05 PM, alsfarms said:

Thanks, your information does clear up the water a bit for a potential buyer.  I thought it was a Special 8, not the Ambassador 8.  Not that it is a big deal, but as I understand it, the Special 8 is not defined classic by the CCCA whereas the Ambassador 8 is catagorized as a full classic.  Do I have that right?

Al

Yes that is correct The 990 and 1090 series which includes the Ambassador and Advanced Eights are considered full classics 

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On 10/17/2021 at 5:28 AM, wayne sheldon said:

I have looked, and watched magazine articles, and advertisements. But never, until tonight, have I seen another 1932 Nash 8 that color!

My wife used to walk our dog the six or so blocks up to town every evening. He remembered every place he had found a french fry, a crust of pizza, or some other tasty treat. She has made generalizations that include me and old cars based on that.

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6 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Twin-Ignition, two spark plugs per cylinder.  Just one of Nash's quirks...

 

Would be interesting to know if there was any advantage to this.  If you have a rotor die or an ignition problem there is no fault tolerance from the dual plugs.   RR on the other hand had true dual ignition in the same era.  One side of the block had a magneto and plugs,  the other side battery/distributor like the Nash.  You could control which or both was firing from the dash which is helpful when diagnosing problems.

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This may be a foolish question to some but, rather than fight with the wood roof section, which will eventually fail again, would it be sacrilegious if one were to weld in a metal section and then cover it with correct looking material to retain the original look?   Leaks and future repairs would be cured forever.  I can appreciate the purity of breed but, I mean, who would ever know?

Greg

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4 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

Would be interesting to know if there was any advantage to this.  If you have a rotor die or an ignition problem there is no fault tolerance from the dual plugs.   RR on the other hand had true dual ignition in the same era.  One side of the block had a magneto and plugs,  the other side battery/distributor like the Nash.  You could control which or both was firing from the dash which is helpful when diagnosing problems.

Maybe it was intended for faster burn with the flame ignited from two sides of the combustion chamber. Thus more complete combustion (better power and efficiency), especially at higher rpms. Pure speculation on my part. 

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15 hours ago, Ozstatman said:

Might be a dumb question here but why so many plug wire connections in the distributor cap ?

In the late 1920's the marketing people figured out the old boys at the gas station were counting the number of plugs to figure out how big the engine was. Seemed like a good plan.

 

Kind of like today where advertised horsepower is calculated at 9,000 RPM.

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5 hours ago, GregLaR said:

This may be a foolish question to some but, rather than fight with the wood roof section, which will eventually fail again, would it be sacrilegious if one were to weld in a metal section and then cover it with correct looking material to retain the original look?   Leaks and future repairs would be cured forever.  I can appreciate the purity of breed but, I mean, who would ever know?

Greg

The guys at the HAMB site use station wagon or van roofs to shape and weld in.

Done all the time. Probably won't affect the value, good chance this ends up a street rod

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A friend of mine just had the top insert of his 1935 Studebaker redone by a local restoration shop. Repaired wood, new padding, leatherette cover, repaired edging, and a headliner. His wallet didn't get hurt as bad as an alternative method would have hurt the car. And it's a driver.

 

The first one lasted 80 years. How long would you be planning to keep yours?

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1 hour ago, 32Buickman said:

The distributor cap appears to be for a 16 cylinder car. How was the engine fired up? Are all the parts there for a complete restoration?

I believe each cylinder has a spark plug on each side of the head of you check the pictures.  

 

Really neat project.  Good thing it’s really far away.

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  • 1 year later...
On 10/21/2021 at 10:18 AM, Gearheadengineer said:

Maybe it was intended for faster burn with the flame ignited from two sides of the combustion chamber. Thus more complete combustion (better power and efficiency), especially at higher rpms. Pure speculation on my part. 

I know it's been a while since this was posted...the twin ignition was supposed to provide more power from a better burn. There are two sets of points in the distributor and a dual contact rotor. The flathead Ford guys use the distributors in twin plug builds and drove prices for a cap (and distributor) through the roof for a Nash guy.

If anyone reading this has wheels like these, I need to replace one on my 32 980.

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Somewhat a strange coincidence that this old thread was just bumped back up, which then prompted me to check in                    on Youtube to see if  "Cliffs Old Cars"  had posted any new videos on a barn weathered 32 Nash 1080 sedan that he worked on last year.  Well, it seems Cliff has been bitten hard by the "32 Nash Second Series bug'' because he just posted 6 days ago about buying "Another 32 Nash"....it's the one in this thread.   

 

wow...this car was sold twice over the years on AACA ads or at least "also posted here for sale". This time I'll bet it will get put back together finally.   I'm not signed up on Youtube to be able contact him, but I'd bet Cliff would like to see the AACA threads on his new car and also the old picture here that shows the car when it was in nice condition.  

 

If you care to see his first 32 1080 sedan,  click on his past videos.  That one has wood wheel and rear spare.

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        

 

                                                                                                 

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