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1929 Stutz Model M Cabriolet Project


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I can't decide if this is more interesting or the GTO I just posted.   I think the GTO is a much better idea.  I can tell you from personal experience the Stutz is a 30k plus engine rebuild.

 

https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1929-stutz-model-m-cabriolet/

 

This 1929 Stutz Model M cabriolet is a non-running project finished in two-tone red and black over a tan vinyl interior. It retains a 322ci inline-eight paired with a three-speed manual transmission. Equipment includes a tan convertible top, luggage rack, ventilating windshield, rumble seat, cowl lights, and dual side-mount spares. The car was purchased by its late owner in the 1960s and reportedly spent approximately two decades on display at the Buffalo Transportation Pierce-Arrow Museum in Buffalo, New York, prior to 2018. This Model M is now offered on dealer consignment with two keys, historical documents, and New York registration.

 

1929_stutz_model_m_cabriolet_1629295161d

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AJ, This checks several boxes and preys on my weaknesses.  Thanks for posting it, I don't regularly cruise BAT, but bounce over when someone brings a car to my attention.  I wonder where this will end up.  my Hoosier roots are "pinging" on this.  

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1 hour ago, ericmac said:

This car is almost screaming at me "bid, bid bid!"  I know it has a lot wrong with a,  but what a car!


 

No, it’s screaming I need fifty grand to become a driver that is reliable. And someone who knows what they are doing.........that 215 Gemmer is gonna be hammered also.

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25 minutes ago, prewarnut said:

I like the clock and piano key that comes with the car...well it is coming from a museum then.

...interesting differential out back.

 

Timken worm drive.  Lowers the entire car 4-5"s.     Also used on the eight cylinder Stearns Knight and probably a couple of other cars.

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8 hours ago, edinmass said:


 

No, it’s screaming I need fifty grand to become a driver that is reliable. And someone who knows what they are doing.........that 215 Gemmer is gonna be hammered also.

 

You know I agree.    There is a 99.9% chance those duraluminum rods are still in there.   George is making steel ones now, right?

 

I would say that if someone was going to pour their blood, sweat and tears in to a prewar car this would be a pretty good one to do it with.

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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9 hours ago, edinmass said:


 

No, it’s screaming I need fifty grand to become a driver that is reliable. And someone who knows what they are doing.........that 215 Gemmer is gonna be hammered also.

Maybe so, I’d put all the money in mechanical, and drive it just as it is…..neat car

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My two bits, for what it's worth, is if one is going to commit a significant portion of the family fortune and share of time to a project, this Stutz would be worth that commitment.   As long as the major expense and difficulty is understood, go into it with your eyes open, motivated by the prospect of enjoying of one of the great cars of that era upon completion.   And if you take the plunge, please take us along and share your experiences with a blog of the process.

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4 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

My two bits, for what it's worth, is if one is going to commit a significant portion of the family fortune and share of time to a project, this Stutz would be worth that commitment.   As long as the major expense and difficulty is understood, go into it with your eyes open, motivated by the prospect of enjoying of one of the great cars of that era upon completion.   And if you take the plunge, please take us along and share your experiences with a blog of the process.


i think a nice running driving one of these sold for 100 something at Hershey a few years ago. 10 years ago Steve Snyder sold the short wheelbase version that was running but with an Engine noise for around 50 K.

 

What I am unsure of is which car I would rather play with. This coupe or this Custom body car.   Base price will probably be noise in the end.

 

 

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I went back and found the other car I was thinking of.  Same body,  but on a later SV chassis.  Also long wheelbase.  Sold for 143k all in back in 2015.  It was a decent older restoration.  You would spend a couple hundred grand to make the subject car as decent as this one was.

 

https://rmsothebys.com/en/auctions/hf15/hershey/lots/r113-1931-stutz-sv-16-convertible-coupe/180664

 

 

StutzLebaronCoupeSV.jpg

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21 minutes ago, alsancle said:

I went back and found the other car I was thinking of.  Same body,  but on a later SV chassis.  Also long wheelbase.  Sold for 143k all in back in 2015.  It was a decent older restoration.  You would spend a couple hundred grand to make the subject car as decent as this one was.

 

https://rmsothebys.com/en/auctions/hf15/hershey/lots/r113-1931-stutz-sv-16-convertible-coupe/180664

 

 

StutzLebaronCoupeSV.jpg

AJ, I'm not trying to start a fight or stir up controversy, but I am curious.  What would have been the "close contemporaries of this stutz?  Packard 740 Convertible coupe?  Pierce A or B convertible coupe? Lincoln L conv coupe?  Cadillac 353 Conv coupe?

 

I started a thread on "Roadsters" that are Classics from the earlier years.  I'm curious how this Stutz fits into the pecking order of the 1930 era.   I realize it isn't a Roadster, but if you compare apples to apples (wheelbase, engine, price, reputation)......where does this stutz fit into the "beauty contest"?

 

 

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By the time the Model M came along, Stutz was just about out of the major market........The SV and DV were great cars as well, but in very small numbers, many or most with outdated coachwork. Don’t get me wrong....I’m a HUGE Stutz fan and I would kill for a DV-32. That said.....the worm drive was outdated and old fashioned. They attempted to adapt, but no money was available. Most cars, 1932 was a leap in chassis and engine performance.......except Stutz, who’s steering box and chassis were unchanged from 1929 but still being used in 1933.

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11 hours ago, John Bloom said:

AJ, I'm not trying to start a fight or stir up controversy, but I am curious.  What would have been the "close contemporaries of this stutz?  Packard 740 Convertible coupe?  Pierce A or B convertible coupe? Lincoln L conv coupe?  Cadillac 353 Conv coupe?

 

I started a thread on "Roadsters" that are Classics from the earlier years.  I'm curious how this Stutz fits into the pecking order of the 1930 era.   I realize it isn't a Roadster, but if you compare apples to apples (wheelbase, engine, price, reputation)......where does this stutz fit into the "beauty contest"?

The late years Stutz are essentially a progressive engine type in an increasingly archaic chassis.  Varying on price and wheelbase, pretty much those you listed would have been 'cross-shopped' at the time, though the Stutz considered a 'niche' maker.  Beyond the standard factory-bodied styles, Stutz offered an extensive choice of custom-bodies with style and verve.   A custom-bodied DV-32 would be the choicest and most expensive.   Not to cast aspersions, but Stutz was trading on its performance reputation to a degree by these late cars.  A first 298 ci then 322 ci straight eight, even with overhead cams, still puts it among the smaller-size Classic powerplants of that era.  Ed will give you the experienced perspective on them.

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Steve, the OHC and later DOHC is what distinguishes late Stutz from all the flathead eights everybody else was making.

 

Because of the worm drive they always sat lower than everyone else too.

 

There was done very cool styling with the custom bodies.

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AJ:

OHC & DOHC plus lower stance were their claim to fame by then, which with the extensive selection of custom coachwork made Stutz a unique choice.  Otherwise, a custom-bodied DuPont G could also fulfill the role.   They mounted a faux-valve cover on the flathead eight to make it look the part...

Steve

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With the introduction of the "M", Stutz made only minor changes to their 8 until the DV came out and the M and SV engines were both underrated horsepower wise.

FYI-not sure what the bumper is on this car but it is not the stock 29 Stutz bumper?

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Steve:

 

Any Stutz is cool!

 

That said, it’s the DV-32 cars that entertain me. Properly built and tweaked they run great.........seems the DV in our garage has pop up pistons, hot cams, and tricked out carb and ignition. How to describe it? SCARY FAST! I tend not to drive it much.......it’s too fun to spin it up to 3500 rpm.........pulls hard and is a joy to drive. Only down side to them.......the very interesting ones are seven figures plus.........not for poor car mechanics! 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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49 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Ed:

 

True, Any Stutz is cool, that's why there are "Stutz Nutz"!   

 

Someone, please find the DV-32 Continental Coupe by Waterhouse...even if you have to make it out of thin air!

 

Steve


How about it’s Irish twin......the Waterhouse Convertible Victoria? 😏
 

I must confess, I was driving it last week! 😎

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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57 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Ed:

 

True, Any Stutz is cool, that's why there are "Stutz Nutz"!   

 

Someone, please find the DV-32 Continental Coupe by Waterhouse...even if you have to make it out of thin air!

 

Steve


the one last seen at an auto show in Maine around 1932?

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1 hour ago, alsancle said:


sold for 60k.  I don’t know what I'm

talking about.


 

I love it when I’m right.........

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I know much money still to be spent, but 60G's does not sound too outrageous. There might be hope yet . Another decade of this trend and who knows ! Trouble is I will be in my mid 70's in a decade and possibly running out of time. But still the dream lives.

Greg

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