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1929 Mopar Radiator Interchange?


Gasket
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I’m not sure if they would interchange, I would be surprised if they did. I do know after recently having my Chrysler 65 radiator rebuilt that even within the model 65 there were many small changes to the radiator actually after looking at other cars there were a lot of change during the year. This makes life nice and interesting 🙄😁

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Sasha39, not an answer to your question, but I had leaky radiator problems with my 1928 Model 72.  No one wanted to do anything with it and I received some hair raising prices to re-core it.  Something about an Auburn type honeycomb that is only reproduced by a company in Europe $$$$.  In the end I found a sympathetic radiator man who does some restoration work and he took the time to work with a stop leak compound that he liked and was able to remedy the problem.  I know it's not a permanent fix but we will see how it goes. 

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7 hours ago, Sasha39 said:

Hey Vintageben, whereabouts did you get your radiator done and did they do a good job?

Yeah I sent my one to Bob Brimms up at Murwillumbah Northern NSW ( about an hour away from me) and me being as careful as I’am with my money(some may say tighter than a fishes 🙄) I was happy enough to go with a quality modern core. My radiator had been messed with over the years so some of the tubes were not even connected into the top tank and as for the bottom tank it was easier to start again. Bob researched a fair bit before he tackled it and that was when he discovered the many changes through the models production. Anyway I was really pleased with end result the car runs much cooler now. Bob is on this forum but if you want I can pm his number to you. Cheers Ben

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Hello, I just had my 28 Plymouth radiator  re-cored.  It split open and was beyond repair  The bottom tank was full of holes and needed remade.  For a  original honeycomb core the price was $5200. I went with the modern core with new bottom tank for $2700.  It took 2 1/2 months to complete as the core had to be made elsewhere and installed at the local shop. I hope the car stays in the family and the radiator should last for the next generation.

IMG_0305_brighter.jpg

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Hi All, Thanks for this useful commentary.... I applied a stop leak type product which did stop the leak on my '29 Chrysler Series 65, but it still boils over after 5 miles down the road. I don't see any problems with the water pump. I did investigate getting it recored--the upper and lower tanks and castings are all OK--but the cost was prohibitive for me. This is what they call an 'O' type core--means rounded on the edges--and it also needs a hole near the bottom for the crank handle. The original type core material is called "auburn" and sometimes also called "diamond"--facts which I learned from some of you all on this forum [thanks]. The material is available from UK and also from Down Under. One radiator restorer says he would simply remove the tanks, make a template of the core, send the template overseas and get back a new core to which he would reattach my old tanks.  I got two estimates, both around 3000US--which in light of materials, and overhead, and skills required is do doubt a decent price.

So now I am thinking about trying to locate a functional used core--which motivated this query. If I'm lucky, and find something that interchanges, I'll let you know.

Hi DFeeney, That's a beautiful Plymouth. Have you got a shot of the rebuilt radiator from the front? What does the 'modern core' look like?

Thanks    

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8 hours ago, Gasket said:

Hi Vintageben,

Very helpful; looks perfectly fine. I did not realize modern core material could be contoured to fit so well.

Many thanks

Yeah it worked out well and didn’t break the bank, I love honeycomb radiators but just couldn’t warrant the cost on thIs driver. The motor runs at the right temp now with a thermostat installed and doesn’t get hot. Hopefully you can find some one locally that can help you out best of luck.

Cheers Ben

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  • 1 month later...

Hello My friends.  In 1929 Plymouth went to a water pump mid year. The radiator inlets were smaller and on the passenger side.  I believe is is a water pump radiator.  The earlier radiator had bigger a   outlet on the driver's side

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  • 6 months later...

Hi All,

I found a 1929 DeSoto radiator; the width was correct, but it was about 1-1/2" taller--so no go.

I ended up having my radiator recored by Gerry Skvarca, in Carnegie Pennsylvania (not far from where I live), who did an excellent job using v-cell type core material sourced from a manufacturer in Maine.  I was told they only manufacture v-cell type.  The material cost of the v-cell core alone was 1,633-. A more nearly correct auburn/diamond type core material sourced from UK would have been 2,600-.  This for my radiator core that measured 26.375" by 20.250" by 2.0". If you need skilled work done, Gerry Skvarca's email is: univeral.carnegie@gmail.com  (He is the former owner of Universal Carnegie Manufacturing which he sold not long ago to someone in Utah.) 

Thanks for everyone's input.

Yours, Jack

radiator done2.jpeg

radiator done.jpeg

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