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To scrap or not scrap?


gearguy32

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Hello, A long story short, I’m helping a friend clean out an estate. Among all the stuff, mostly old car parts etc, is a number of radiators many of which are honeycomb. The price of scrap being what it is, he would like to recycle them. I’m not so sure though. The problem, of course, is identifying them as I have no idea. If anyone has any thoughts, ideas or input on this, I would really appreciate it. Thank You. 

Edited by gearguy32
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Pictures and measurements width, height and how thick the core is. Also what is the core made of can help identify the age . look for a possible tag as to manufacturer riveted on someplace too. It most likely will not be to large.

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1 hour ago, gearguy32 said:

Hello, A long story short, I’m helping a friend clean out an estate. Among all the stuff, mostly old car parts etc, is a number of radiators many of which are honeycomb. The price of scrap being what it is, he would like to recycle them. I’m not so sure though. The problem, of course, is identifying them as I have no idea. If anyone has any thoughts, ideas or input on this, I would really appreciate it. Thank You. 

 

Honeycombs are always needed by someone. 

Without good pics and measurements you'll have a hard time recycling them to anyone but if you provide those two basic things, they'll sell to anyone in the world if someone needs it. 


Always consider the time and cost to ship and if you don't have the patience for it then maybe sell as a lot to someone who will see that they find good homes. I'd be a buyer if you have the Fedders radiator I'm looking for. 

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Scrap them...the time it's gonna take to figure what you have,usuable or not ,place ads,answer questions and deal with folks over and over etc...to attract one or 2 possible sales in year.

 I bet there is nothing  rare or unusual anyway.

 Life is a one way ticket,and to short to fool around.

Only possibly save the cellular radiators or tube and fins jobs that they are old enough the tanks and sides were exposed ..and generally have a name or badge on front.

And those will most likey have shot cores.

.

 

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The location is upstate NY zip 13825. I won’t be there again for another couple days but will try to get some pics, measurements etc. I just thought that maybe their might be some resource of information that could ID these radiators based on tag numbers, numbers embossed in the tanks etc, but probably not the case. It would be great if someone was close enough to just come and buy them all. We just don’t really have the time to individually advertise, sell, pack and ship each one at a time. My thanks to everyone for their input. I think you just confirmed what I already suspected. I’ll try to get some pics, measurements etc posted in a couple days. 

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4 hours ago, gearguy32 said:

The price of scrap being what it is, he would like to recycle them.

 

Does this mean the price of scrap is so low you'd rather sell to someone who could use them? Or does it mean the price of scrap is high enough you'd you'd rather just scrap them (recycle=scrap)?

 

Take some pictures, give a location, and put them up for sale as a package deal CHEAP, meaning a little more than you'd get by selling them for scrap value.

 

 

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3 hours ago, 30DodgePanel said:

Always consider the time and cost to ship and if you don't have the patience for it then maybe sell as a lot to someone who will see that they find good homes.

My thoughts exactly. Scrap has the pleasure of one sale and one delivery. Selling them individually is work. And with the age of the cars that you would be dealing in you are going to be selling to a group my grandfather would say "have fish hooks in their pockets".

 

I would sell the obviously best ones first then make a package deal on the remainder. Relocate them away from the other car parts and act as ignorant as possible. The more you can convince a bulk buyer that he is stealing them from you, the more you can get. Play the uninformed seller act, best approach.

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2 hours ago, gearguy32 said:

I just thought that maybe their might be some resource of information that could ID these radiators based on tag numbers, numbers embossed in the tanks etc,

You are correct that there may be tags and numbers, usually on the top tank, that will help to identify them.  Even just the tanks may be worth something to someone.  If they get scrapped they are gone forever.  Contrary to some opinions on here, and remember that is all they are, some of us actually enjoy IDing stray parts and the challenge/success that goes along with the sale and you just never know who you might meet along the way.  Good luck and yes please post pictures and take advantage of the What is it? 

 

Don

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You could run a few pictures of all the stuff over the hill to Norwich and see if anyone at the museum takes an interest. A hoard of parts that close should be known anyway and they might be able to tell you the whole history.

 

I am pretty familiar with all the hoards within a 15-20 mile radius of me. And I had coffee with a guy who knows an overlapping radius of him, and he knows another guy, and so on. There is a network out there. All you need to do is find the first domino.

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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So far there are no photos of the radiators to look at, so we are clueless as to what era they are from. There may be ONE GUY with a parts book that can ID them by number, so the photos are all you are going to deal with. That and a $50.00 minimum to ship one out of state, never mind the West Coast. Why is there a collection of them in the first place, are they NOS or someone's scrap collection? How long a drive is it to a scrap yard? I know reality is sometimes painful. Bob 

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
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I wish someone within a hundred miles of me had a bunch of radiators that I could choose a couple salvageable cores to modify to fit a couple of my cars. Years ago, I got an unknown honeycomb type core in nice condition. No idea what it was from. But I had a car that needed a radiator that the core was big enough to fit. I cut the honeycomb core down to size, and made/modified the tanks and mounting brackets. Looked great! Fit perfect, and cooled very well. And it saved a couple hundred dollars.

Right now, I have a couple projects that could benefit from such an altered radiator. It really annoys me that the local wrecking yard won't sell anything for less than about ten times its scrap value, regardless of other salability.

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10 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

So far there are no photos of the radiators to look at, so we are clueless as to what era they are from. There may be ONE GUY with a parts book that can ID them by number, so the photos are all you are going to deal with. That and a $50.00 minimum to ship one out of state, never mind the West Coast. Why is there a collection of them in the first place, are they NOS or someone's scrap collection? How long a drive is it to a scrap yard? I know reality is sometimes painful. Bob 

Give the guy a chance. 14 hours ago he told you it would be a couple of days before he got back there. If he was good enough to post here what he had found we should give him the time he needs to do what he said...

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 I have a 38 Buick honey comb radiator with brass tanks and a 55 Chrysler radiator that I wanted to sell but I think that the shipping would be more than the value of the radiator.

 So I think that they will soon go for scrap.  😨

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3 hours ago, Roger Walling said:

 I have a 38 Buick honey comb radiator with brass tanks and a 55 Chrysler radiator that I wanted to sell but I think that the shipping would be more than the value of the radiator.

 So I think that they will soon go for scrap.  😨

That is why we have swap meets.

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20 hours ago, gearguy32 said:

 I just thought that maybe their might be some resource of information that could ID these radiators based on tag numbers, numbers embossed in the tanks etc, 

 

You are in the right place, this IS the ONLY resource your going to find all in one place with the click of a mouse. If you're looking for a catalog that covers various makes and years, it doesn't exist that I know of. So again, your best option is let folks here help out with the valuable ones and sell the rest as a lot... 

 

If you post an ad on here under "PARTS FOR SALE" and list them ALL as a lot you'll find a buyer in the upper northeast part of the country I'm sure of it. 

 

If you were in the southwest and if there are some good pieces in the pile I'd be a buyer but since it's upstate NY I'm just a viewer hoping to help identify them. 

 

One last thought is consignment.

Meaning if you could find someone willing to do the work and ship everything then give them big cut it might work out for both parties. I know there are guys on here who sell on eBay and other sites so if the price is right and if everyone can make a profit it might be another option to think about. 

If your friend decides to go this route it will take time, probably a lot of it. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, 1912Staver said:

Without knowing what they are scrapping might be tragic. Most will be worth little more than scrap, but the odd one may be much more valuable. But you need to post pictures and let the collective knowledge try to guide you.

You are on point. I had bought 1 lot (16) of American made pliers from an eBay seller for about $25.00. One pair had Cadillac in script on it so I put that one back for sale and got over $100. for it. You just never know if you don't do any research or post photos so others can help.

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11 minutes ago, JFranklin said:

The first one looks like my "36 Chevrolet.

According to the list TerryB posted, that one is for a 1936 Chevrolet. I found this site that claims the middle one is for a 1933 Chevrolet, though I'm sure the parts book could confirm.  https://thebrassworks.net/blogs/comments-questions-somewhat-helpful-information/harrison-radiator-part-stampings

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The Harrison book does not show a part number 31001.  If you add the 33 G, still no exact match, however if you look at the closest numbers in the catalog to 3100133 it gets it into the realm of 1933-36 Chevrolet.  The chance of it being Chevrolet/ GM is good.

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On 9/23/2021 at 10:59 AM, gearguy32 said:

Hello, A long story short, I’m helping a friend clean out an estate. Among all the stuff, mostly old car parts etc, is a number of radiators many of which are honeycomb. The price of scrap being what it is, he would like to recycle them. I’m not so sure though. The problem, of course, is identifying them as I have no idea. If anyone has any thoughts, ideas or input on this, I would really appreciate it. Thank You. 

 

Where are you located?

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