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Need advice on stripping down chassis


22touring
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Posted (edited)

I figured out what the problem was.  Three of the four brake control rods (the rods that run between the differential and the brake spider) had both the 3/16" solid pin and the 3/16" key holding the operating levers to the rod, as Horace Dodge designed it (Horace certainly didn't want to see any DB brake failures).  On one of the rods, however, "somebody had already been in there" and had omitted the solid pins when re-assembling, instead using only the keys.  At first I couldn't figure out that there was just no pin in there.

 

Those 3/16" solid pins were difficult to pound out.  I really had to beat on them to get them loose and was afraid that I might break something.

 

I got the differential, axles, propellor shaft and brake spiders disassembled as much as possible, while taking careful notes and pictures.  Now I'm going to sandblast the assembly.  I'm going to try to block all the orifices and entry points that might allow sand to get inside the unit.  Has anybody else out there ever done this before?  Can you give me any advice for keeping the sand out?

Edited by 22touring
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Posted (edited)

I learned the hard way (by restoring the front leaf springs and making all the mistakes you can make) how to restore leaf springs most efficiently, and am using this method in doing the rear 3/4-elliptic springs:

 

Disassemble the spring and blast all the flat surfaces.  Don't try to blast the edges yet because it will waste too much sand and air.  Bolt the leaves together.  Now blast the edges of the leaves.  Hang the assembled spring up, mask the end bushings, prime and paint it.  Disassemble it again, paint the bare flat surfaces with liquid graphite and hang the individual leaves up to dry.  When the graphite is dry, assemble the spring again.

Edited by 22touring
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10 hours ago, 22touring said:

I learned the hard way (by restoring the front leaf springs and making all the mistakes you can make) how to restore leaf springs most efficiently, and am using this method in doing the rear 3/4-elliptic springs:

 

Disassemble the spring and blast all the flat surfaces.  Don't try to blast the edges yet because it will waste too much sand and air.  Bolt the leaves together.  Now blast the edges of the leaves.  Hang the assembled spring up, mask the end bushings, prime and paint it.  Disassemble it again, paint the bare flat surfaces with liquid graphite and hang the individual leaves up to dry.  When the graphite is dry, assemble the spring again.

T was told by an old fella mechanic that you never lubricate the spring leaves 

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I took my steering box to an excellent local machinist, who took the slop out of the worm/wormwheel mesh.  Everything was in good condition except that the original slots in the brass eccentric bushing did not provide a correct mesh.  He cut a new slot in the eccentric bushing and made a new locating pin with an offset.  The wormwheel is cut so that at 4 different positions around it, the mesh is about 2 thousandths tighter than on the rest of the wormwheel.  The steering is supposed to be centered when the wormwheel is at one of these 4 points.  On my steering box, one of those 4 points is better than the others, so I am going to choose that one for the final set-up.  Since the drag link is not adjustable in length, I guess the only way to do that is to rotate the wormwheel to the correct position.

 

He also bored out the inner diameter of the second gear on the countershaft to fit the roller bearing countershaft and broached a new keyway in it.  He said the gear material was extremely hard, and he had to use every trick in the book in order to machine it.  Since the lateral position of the new gear is slightly different from that of the old-type gear, it was also necessary to make a thin shim for the countershaft in order to move the gear into the correct position.  

Edited by 22touring (see edit history)
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Ron Lawson wrote:  I was told by an old fella mechanic that you never lubricate the spring leaves

 

Of course our early DB cars have no shock absorbers, so some people don't like to lubricate the spring leaves because creating friction between them reduces rebound.  However, it also tends to wear the springs out and sometimes to break them (leaves will get rusted together, and then when you go over a big bump sometime one of the springs will break at that point).  I want to keep my springs leaves well-lubricated and in good condition, so I am prepared to tolerate all the rebound.  

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On 12/29/2021 at 6:32 AM, 22touring said:

Concerning removal of the brake pedal from the clutch cover: I thought for sure that nearchoctown would know the answer.  I wish I could ping somebody like Rodger "Dodger" Hartley or Bob Scafani with the question, because they know everything.  (Of course I could send them a message, but I hate to bother the poor guys every time I encounter a problem.)

Sorry to be tardy with this. I have been 'Off Line' with problems at home. In '19 ish DB changed the clutch pedal linkage from a direct connect to the shaft to a 'compound' type where the lever sticking up for the pedal fastens to another short link below and shaft that goes inside to operate the clutch. This may be pointed out in that 'Mechanics Instruction Manual' or in a copy of the Owners Manual. Perhaps it may be clear in the Lubrication Chart. I do hope you are taking copiuus photos and a notebook full of notes.  Remember if it was EASY anyone could do it!  Good Luck!

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Also in the rear end, etc. some of those pins you are trying to get out may be tapered pins and will only come out opposite from where they were inserted then rounded off on the other end.  In other words they didn't see any need to remove them for service. 

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On 7/9/2022 at 5:32 PM, 22touring said:

The Master Parts List, at page 134, says there is supposed to be a front body to frame pad on top of each frame rail on both sides, so 2 part nos. 19640 for the front of the frame.  Then it says there are supposed to be center and rear body to frame pads on each side; all 4 of those were the same, part no. 3612.  I'd like to know about how long part nos. 19640 and 3612 were.  Are they all supposed to be located at the body-to-frame bolts? Anybody have a picture of the body to frame pads installed on a frame? Thank you.

22touring, I think you will find the long pad like in your picture from Myers goes on top of the frame full length in the area where the running board splash shields go up over it. Then there are individual pads of a heavier material (appx. 2x4") that go where the body bolts go on top of those splash shields. There are a pair all the way at the rear of the body on each side as well as those body bolts in the flat surface of the frame ahead of the curve down where those splash shields go. I hope this helps.  RAH

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Posted (edited)

Hi Rodger.  I'm glad you joined the discussion.

 

I've got the rear axle and differential assembly all stripped down for sandblasting, but I've got a bunch of other parts I need to blast first.  Those 3/4-elliptic rear leaf springs have lots of surface area and take a long time.

 

 

DSC_0131.JPG

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On 7/29/2022 at 10:21 PM, RAH said:

22touring, I think you will find the long pad like in your picture from Myers goes on top of the frame full length in the area where the running board splash shields go up over it. Then there are individual pads of a heavier material (appx. 2x4") that go where the body bolts go on top of those splash shields. There are a pair all the way at the rear of the body on each side as well as those body bolts in the flat surface of the frame ahead of the curve down where those splash shields go. I hope this helps.  RAH

22touring, You will not need to do anything with those long straps or the body bolt pads until you are completely finished with the chassis AND the body. When you are ready to install the body I would first install the running board splash aprons over those long straps (three screws on each side LOOSELY) and have the body supported above the frame with just enough clearance to insert those individual pads and bolts (Down from inside the body). I would not tighten any of those body bolts OR the radiator mounting bolts up front until all the pushing and shoving gets the doors to close properly AND the hood to close on both sides at cowl and radiator shell spacing looks good. By the way for what it's worth I went over to an industrial supply house and procured a square foot of commercial belting. It was about 3/8 inch thick and cut it into the rectangular pads for the body bolt areas.  Good Luck and keep up the good work.

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I'm starting to get a swollen head now that all the DB experts from around the world have chimed into my thread to offer advice on my restoration!

 

Speaking of DB experts, did I ever tell you about the time, back in about 1985, when I bought my touring car after it had been in storage for a long time, I joined the DB Club and saw Bob Scafani's name on the roster?  I was then living in Berkeley, CA and Bob lived in the Fremont area, maybe about 25 miles away, so I decided to drive over to his house. The car drove flawlessly there and back, except that the original top tried to self-destruct on the way over, and as I remember Bob and I had to apply a lot of duct tape to prevent further damage on the way home.  Here are a couple of pictures from that occasion.  It was really a pleasure to meet Bob, and he was extremely helpful to me.  Besides which, he's the DB Knowledge King!  I'll never be as smart as he is!  (OK, I guess that's enough ingratiation; I don't want to overdo it.)  However, Bob seems to be rather reclusive.  Or maybe he just thinks I'm an idiot.  Whichever, my ambition is to have him post a message in this thread, too!

at bob scafanis.jpg

at bob scafanis1.jpg

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My rear axle seals were leaking pretty badly, and both sets of brakes on both sides were quite oily.  However, even though they were oily, they were actually working.  I'm going to buy 5 gallons of naphtha from Tractor Supply, and before adding it to my parts washer I'm going to wash all the brake shoes in the clean solvent and call it good.

 

I ordered new axle seals from Myers.  Can anybody tell me if there's some trick to installing them?  I could find in neither the Book of Instruction nor the Mechanic's Instruction Manual anything about doing it.  I also searched for threads on this forum, but couldn't find one that explains how.  Could anybody please clue me in?  Thanks again.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

I got the chassis pretty much completed, and am going back to work on the body, which is coming along nicely so far.  It would be nice to be able to shoot the color coat within the reasonably near future.

chassis done 8-14-2022.jpg

more body work 8-16-2022.jpg

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