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1928 D B Technical advice on Seats


trini
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I like to get some advice  or feed back on using the original springs on the front seat ( not the back rest for the front seat )on my 1928 D B  Senior 4 door. This seat has to lifted up to access the battery and the tool box. It is heavy to say the least. I am thinking about replacing it with foam. After  92 years the springs are still good. The horse hair is in good condition. WHAT IS YOUR THOUGHT ON THIS?

I would like to hear from Ron Lawson because he has done one recently.

 

Harry   

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Let’s see ride in comfort hour after hour or screw your back up with a foam seat, but you may be able to lift that light seat up easily 3 times a year, that is if your back isn’t hurting from driving all day.  If you need to go ahead and ask what I think of one of the foam seats that I have !

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  • 1 month later...

Incydervine thank you, Can I contact you directly ? Or you contact me  through this forum ? I do not know how to do " P M "

I saved all the horse hair I could but they are breaking  up like fine dust, Too old.  My Phone # is 905 889 0621 , hsahu8034@gmail,com 

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On 11/10/2021 at 1:32 PM, nearchoclatetown said:

How about using roo hair?

That is a novel, and possibly the best, material available for upholstering a car seat. My only apprehension is that it may be too springy for any real comfort🙄.

Edited by Jack Bennett (see edit history)
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9 hours ago, Jack Bennett said:

That is a novel, and possibly the best, material available for upholstering a car seat. My only apprehension is that it may be too springy for any real comfort🙄.

The one positive is, using roo hair, you'd get a jump on the competition when you have the car judged.  I think you'll be kicking yourself if you don't consider it......it's probably a great material down under your butt.....

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On 9/20/2021 at 8:37 AM, trini said:

I like to get some advice  or feed back on using the original springs on the front seat ( not the back rest for the front seat )on my 1928 D B  Senior 4 door. This seat has to lifted up to access the battery and the tool box. It is heavy to say the least. I am thinking about replacing it with foam. After  92 years the springs are still good. The horse hair is in good condition. WHAT IS YOUR THOUGHT ON THIS?

I would like to hear from Ron Lawson because he has done one recently.

 

Harry   

I have a wrestled with how I wanted to do the seats of my 1923 Dodge roadster for almost two years. There was nothing, including a dashboard or steering wheel in the bucket when I bought the car. There was a set of springs, which clearly showed they had been out in the weather for nearly 100 years. Actually, looking at them scared me when I considered the amount of time it would take to rebuild them. And, as I said, I tried everything from building a wooden frame, with stretchy straps, to the seat of a old couch with stretchy straps and foam, But nothing seem to work to my satisfaction, and only ate up a lot of time to take it back out. After nearly 2 years, a lot of wire, and more than a few cut and poked fingers I have managed to rebuild the springs to the point they are darn comfortable. As shown in my photos I am now dealing with the seat back. In this car the seat base is removable, but the seat back is built into the car. I have spent many hours in the junkyard looking for a more modern seat back, with springs to cover and use in the car. And, again I have spent money for things I have put in, only to take back out. Finally, I remembered why I bought the car…and that was to rebuild it as a hobby. So, as you can see, I am back to the original plans to build a seat back of wood, and try to mold the upholstery in the bucket to has nearly the original shape as possible. I have a bad arm, my hands are arthritic, I have a 30 year old, usually broken industrial sewing machine I am not good at working with, but in someway or another I will finish the upholstery to where I stand back and look at my old car, And say OMG, I done that! OH….and the “original”, in this case is miles from being a “purist”, even if I could. I have found that things just work better on these old cars when something is replaced as near its “original” shape as trying to reinvent something from 2021 to fit a 1923 DB Roadster correctly.

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Snyders Antique Auto parts, (Model A and T) got their start making seat spring. They should be able to make springs for you. They may even have the patterns, if not, paper pattern should work along with any other information you can give them.

Snyder's Antique Auto Parts - Model A Ford and Model T Ford Parts

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Jack, I'm curious if the springs on a '23 are constructed similar to those on the '25.  It's one thing to replace coils and bend wire but I'm struggling with what to do about a rusted outer frame on the front seat back.  It's like a C-channel with a piece of dense, fiberboard-like material crimped in (that holds upholstery tacks, see circled area).  It bolts into the car with welded on tabs.  It's also very 3-dimensional (see the curves on upper corners)....  I would welcome any tips/work-arounds. 

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