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Brennan Car Factory- Syracuse, NY 1970s


Walt G

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Took these over 40 years ago with black & white film and a real camera that took a roll of film that you had to take to a place to be developed and then have prints made. Anyone remember doing that?   Note the 2nd and 3rd floor door access to load /unload supplies . Great period brick building . Sign on one side faded but still there after 65+ years at that time. This is what I do in my spare time - chase ghosts...........................

BrennanCarFactory1970s.jpg

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Very cool! I love older architecture almost as much as I love old cars. 

 

I remember the days of film camera and I much prefer the storage capacity of digital photography. With my somewhat shaky hands it's so much nicer to see if I have to retake a photo right then and there so I'm able to do so. I'm willing to forgo some of the depth of field for that, a compromise I'm happy to make up for. 

 

I want to learn how to do Daguerreotype images at some point, but I have too many other things I collect and spend my time on to set that aside to take up something new. 

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14 hours ago, Walt G said:

Took these over 40 years ago with black & white film and a real camera that took a roll of film that you had to take to a place to be developed and then have prints made. Anyone remember doing that? 

Absolutely!  And I went one step further and printed my own in school; making a contact sheet, and then BURN and DODGE to get that 'perfect print'!  

 

Not sure where you taught art, but where I went had a Photographic Arts department.

 

Craig

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Craig , I taught art here in the village of Floral Park full time eventually , but at the Elementary level ( ages 5 to 12) so no photo lab in the school - but in the high school there was .

I think the "instant" factor to capture images of the moment and some recording of data with the more modern cell phone and even cameras with a chip are wonderful, but film ( in assorted sizes) is what I grew up with  - the "Brownie " box camera, folding cameras my parents used, etc. But I only really appreciated the photographers " of the era" like John Adams Davis, Nathan Lazernick, Bond Brothers and other commercial photographs who had to cope with glass plate negatives, hoods over their heads while working to keep out the light etc. to do their artistry. And artists they were indeed.  The detail that could be picked up on a 8 x 10 glass plate negative of the subject being photographed is totally amazing.

Austin Clark used to use 4 x 5 inch sheet film and a camera that required it to copy a lot of the period photographs he had or could borrow as well as use the same sheet film but in color for the post cards he would make.

I know I have mentioned here that the Mack Truck archives survive ( all 47, steel four drawer filing cabinets full) of their efforts to produce motor trucks - do so because when Mack decided to dispose of all of those upon relocating from Brooklyn, NY to Allentown, Pa. they wound up (with great effort to move them)  in the basement of a house in Glen Cove, N.Y. to be preserved for the next 35 years before going back to Mack who realized that history of their product was important at the urging of author and historian John B. Montville, who had access to that negatives when he was writing his book on Mack.

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Great pictures!  Like Billy, I love old buildings (especially with old signs) as well as old cars.  Speaking of the latter, what's the black pickup in the second pic?  Looks Ford-ish but the grill doesn't seem right.

 

20 hours ago, Walt G said:

...Anyone remember doing that?...

Yes, I do.  As you say, the professional photographers were artists who produced amazing pictures with non-digital cameras.  But for the casual picture-taker like myself, digital gives immediate results easier and cheaper - film and developing wasn't cheap and I always managed to waste a few shots.

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I put a strong magnifying glass on the print I have that I scanned and put on here. The black pickup truck has four letters on the front of the hood edge so must be a newish ( for the year) FORD -  ( I really wanted to say CORD , but would get a few of you smirking at that reply, shaking your heads and then commenting that "He doesn't know diddley squat")

I have about 4 other photos of the same group /complex of buildings .

This could be the start of another General Discussion topic - Automotive Building Architecture of the Era - no , I won't go there ( yes I have a lot of building photos of dealerships, factories, etc) as the topic has on a few random occasions, been covered under some other categories - would drive our moderators crazy . I posted the Fox Car factory here someplace already and there was a great followup with current images.

Yes, I have waaay to many ideas about historical places, buildings, cars etc.Thanks for putting up with me!

WG

 

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14 hours ago, JACK M said:

Digital is convenient, but the part I miss is looking at snap shots.

I know one can still get these printed, but not many do.

 

The best part about digital is you can see results instantly and the second best part is you can make them better if necessary, or worse if you're no good  with photoshop or the like.

Then I upload them to Walgreens for prints on real photographic negative paper........cheap too!

 

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22 hours ago, Walt G said:

Austin Clark used to use 4 x 5 inch sheet film and a camera that required it to copy a lot of the period photographs he had or could borrow as well as use the same sheet film but in color for the post cards he would make.

I know I have mentioned here that the Mack Truck archives survive ( all 47, steel four drawer filing cabinets full) of their efforts to produce motor trucks - do so because when Mack decided to dispose of all of those upon relocating from Brooklyn, NY to Allentown, Pa. they wound up (with great effort to move them)  in the basement of a house in Glen Cove, N.Y. to be preserved for the next 35 years before going back to Mack who realized that history of their product was important at the urging of author and historian John B. Montville, who had access to that negatives when he was writing his book on Mack.

If you really want to see some really gorgeous high-resolution 8X10 glass negative images, visit the Cty of Vancouver archives site:  41bad90b-5ecb-425d-8ce0-171326ef8bac-A17

 

It appears all the images were scanned full size, and none of the incredible detail gets lots when one views the full size image.

 

Craig

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