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Tourer in San Francisco Jan. 1, 1912


AdamsBros
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I recently digitized my family photographs, including this one of my grandfather chauffeuring this tourer in San Francisco. The back of the photo reads: "Happy New Year, Jan. 1, 1912.

 

In addition to the overall shot, I zoomed  on the wheel bearing cap to find any clue as to the manufacturer.  I have eliminated many of the common 1911-1912 cars but still can't find this one. Any suggestions as to what it is? 

 

Thank you, in advance for your help.

 

IMG_5487.jpeg.21de8d7a0b437de5368cbe4131ca5419.jpegPhoto649569918399.1_inner_0-0-1000-0-0-765-1000-765.jpg.a64d004c1aed98787b70fc09c8a1187a.jpg

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35 minutes ago, AHa said:

That radiator looks like the later American Underslung but the chassis does not appear to be underslung. Is this possibly one of the rare overslung Americans?

 

Interesting thought. I hadn't gone into the history of American until now. My 1982 copy of The Standard Catalog suggests that Harry Stutz designed the 'regular' chassis models which were only available from 1909 to 1911, although for 1910 and 1911 there only a limousine. 

 

In 1909 there were three regular models, the 7 passenger Tourist at $4,000, and the 5 passenger Gadabout and Wayfarer, both at $3,750. Prices in the same area as the underslung models.

 

There are some pics and specs here - American Underslung new and classic car specs (carfolio.com)

 

This is the Wayfarer - maybe this predates the models with the raised hood section -  See the source image

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Lower in this forum you can find the American Underslung thread with pictures of the underslungs. The radiator is quite distinctive. The American Wayfarer, depicted above, is an overslung model. I think what we have in the OP's picture is an American Underslung in the oversprung configuration. Interesting to note the front doors have hardware hinges attached to the outside of the body.

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Uploaded a few GJG images. In most car magazines like The Horseless Age, Cycle and Automobile Trade Journal and MoToR, articles on the GJG can be found. The uploaded image of the Scout is from MoToR. The article in The Horseless Age also shows the other regular model, the Pirate. The photo of the racer (showing more clearly the radiator shape) can be found in the Detroit Public Library, where only photos of chassis and racers of this type are available. Other photos show the 1912 Junior, an attractive, but much smaller model, and with a conventional, roundish radiator top.

MoToR 1910-4 p.78.jpg

HA Vol.25 p.928.jpg

GJG 1912 racer.jpg

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Now that's a gas tank ! It looks huge unless it is quite narrow compared to most others from this time frame. Also note the length of the pitman arm. I don't recall ever seeing one that put the drag link at such an extreme angle. But generally the pitman arm shaft is either on top of the frame rail or goes through it. On this car the shaft is underneath the frame, quite unusual compared to what is generally done. 

Great photo !

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8 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

Now that's a gas tank ! It looks huge unless it is quite narrow compared to most others from this time frame. Also note the length of the pitman arm. I don't recall ever seeing one that put the drag link at such an extreme angle. But generally the pitman arm shaft is either on top of the frame rail or goes through it. On this car the shaft is underneath the frame, quite unusual compared to what is generally done. 

Great photo !

I can't say I have thought much about the geometry you mention but the angle of the drag link on the car above is not too dissimilar to our 1926 Pontiac. As far as I know it has never been apart. Finding a bare chassis photo of other cars of the era to compare it with might not be easy.

 

Btw in the latest event the Pontiac used for, an off road trial, it 'failed to proceed' partway through the day, which turned out to be due to a broken axle (left rear). It broke at the point where the spline begins just out of the diff unit. The axle looked to be a replacement from way back in the day. A spare has been found which will be fitted soon. We have never separated the engine and gearbox so the opportunity will be taken to sort the clutch which has always been a lot less than perfect.

 

 

Hadstock 18 J McD photo (2).jpg

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