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Flames out the exhaust 1923 Hudson


rhurst
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Came across an article in the Houghton Lake Resorter about a guy named Dale Smith that was restoring a 1923 Hudson. This car has the carburetor mounted to the exhaust manifold.  I'm sure it was done to keep the dust and dirt from the road from getting into the carburetor.  He mentions in the article with an adjustment you can shoot Flames out of the exhaust.  Just what adjustment would I have to make.  I notice the connection to the manifold has a pipe with holes in it that adjust the air coming into the carburetor.  Does anyone have any knowledge of this little trick?  It would be cool as long as it doesn't burn up the car.

Robert

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1923, that would mean that it has an updraft carb and the intake and exhaust are mounted/connected together to; make for easy mounting on an inline engine AND quickly and easily heat the carb/intake to vaporize the thick heavy fuels that were dispensed back then. (it was a big problem)

 

Now as for blowing flames. . . .  ANY fire needs three things heat, fuel and ignition.  

A well tuned car runs with a 14.7:1 air fuel ration and does not put out excess UNBURNED fuel in the exhaust.  That is how a car is supposed to run

 

If you want to 'blow flames' you need to make the fuel mixture rich (pull out the choke is common) then you need and ignition. In the 50s rodders would drill and tap a spark plug in the tail pipe and connect it to the coil with a switch - pull coke, activate spark and instant flames. 

 

Backfires can also throw a 'flame' and that might be what this guy is doing. Ancient cars have manual chokes and hand mechanisms that can adjust the timing from the dashboard. . . . . 

 

Of course all this is incredibly dangerous and in no way is it good for the car 

Edited by m-mman (see edit history)
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Thank you guys you answered my question. I will abandon my quest for flames.  Got the engine running smoothly and

don't want to cause any damage. I've been using non-ethanol fuel with a little added lead. Don't think there was any plastic parts in the  engine or carburetor to be affected by the ethanol but didn't want to take any chances.  The engine was rebuilt and now has 17,000 miles on it but not sure those miles are since the rebuild. Any thoughts on the fuel topic?

Robert   

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