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Series 14 Carpet


Akstraw
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I have a 1930 convertible coupe, restored in the early eighties to the best of my knowledge.  I would like to redo the floor mat/carpeting.   I am looking for information on what type of carpet was used on the original, and ideally, some photos of the carpet in an original car, if anyone has one.  The photos attached below are what is in my car now.  Thanks!  -Andrew

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Yes, I have looked at the drawings.  The ones for series 14 all seem to reference the “Trim Plan” or say “See Specifications” when it comes to a description of the carpet itself.  I am interested in getting a feel for the type, density and length of pile that was used at the time.  I suppose it doesn’t really matter that much, anything I use will probably look good.

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Wilton wool carpet is what Franklin used in most of the cars. You can get it from Bill Hirsch. 

 

Some models had a rubber mat in the front compartment, but they didn't last and were replaced with carpet during an early restoration.  A member in Canada has made a mold for replacement rubber mat for his Series 11A. 

 

According to Tom Hubbard, most of the cars used taupe colored carpets, no matter what the interior colors were. When I asked him more about a specific shade, he said. "You know, the color of dirt". When you consider there were very few paved roads and not a lot of sidewalks, carpets got dirty so a dirt colored carpet made more sense. But there are enough original examples of carpet that blend with the interior colors to pick whatever you like. Keep in mind that colors that are very dark, or very light will show dirty foot prints more easily.  

 

Hank M. had a bunch of NOS Franklin carpets at a Trek to sell. Most were taupe. 

 

The binding was either russet leather color or a complementary color if the carpet was not taupe. And starting about 1930 imitation leather was coming into wide use for binding. However, modern imitation leather, while more durable than leather, tends to be thicker and it's not as easy to use in binders, or form neat corners as  leather binding. Especially if you want it to look like the original way the binding was sewn on. 

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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