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37-Years-Owned 1933 Buick Model 91 Club Sedan


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Matt and I were talking about this in the other Model 90 for sale thread.   It deserves its own thread.

 

I love it.   Feel like it should be worth 30k plus even though it sounds like a bi-plane from "the Great Waldo Pepper".

 

It has paperwork from day one and photos of it before being restored.  Colors look to match original ones.

 

https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1933-buick-90-series/

 

This 1933 Buick Model 91 Club Sedan was delivered new by Howard Automobile Company of Los Angeles, California on February 10, 1933. The car was moved to Daytona Beach, Florida by the 1950s and was removed from storage in Florida when the seller acquired it in 1984. Under current ownership the exterior was refinished in two-tone brown and the tan interior was reupholstered. Power comes from a 345ci inline-eight paired with a three-speed manual transmission, and features include hood louvers, running boards, side-mounted spare tires, 17″ wire wheels, a flying-lady ornament, and an integral trunk. This Series 90 is now offered with manufacturer’s literature, service records dating back to the 1950s, some older photos, and a Florida title in the seller’s name.

 

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1933_buick_90_series_162853234276a628c37

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In another thread, this car was mentioned,

and Matt Harwood pointed out that this 1933 Buick

has water jackets that are badly deteriorated.

He noticed it from the Bring-a-Trailer pictures.

A disaster impending, as I recall he said.

 

Maybe he'll comment here.  But I wanted to point

this out so that everyone has full information.

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Should someone here buy this Buick, I have the contact information for the young fellow who bought that lwb '33 Buick 90 hearse that has been cut down to a truck.  He has thoughts about making it a gasoline delivery tanker recreation but might be persuaded to sell for the new owner of this car for its engine, which if I recall correctly is low mileage.

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If you really want one of these and don't want to embark on a major mechanical odyssey, my former business partner apparently still has this black one available for $37,900 (I bet it could be bought for $35,000). Apparently a proven tour car, although I don't rightly know what that means anymore. Probably better mechanically than the tan one but the interior isn't as nice. Trade-offs, trade-offs. I will say that if the Lincoln wasn't in my garage right now, I'd probably go see him right now and try to buy this black one despite my history with the seller. I like it a lot.

 

Think of this brute with some fresh blackwalls:

 

IMG_3-3.jpg

 

https://vintagemotorcarsusa.com/1933-buick-model-90-club-sedan/

 

 

 

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I've been watching that black club sedan ever since it first went on sale about 2 years ago.  I like the brown color better, but either way I think the '33s (and '28s) have the best styling of any year Buick.  If I could just convince my wife that we need a 2nd old car , and if my tiny garage was bigger ... :)

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1 hour ago, alsancle said:

Boy,  the BAT comment section is 90 percent idiots.

Why does every prewar sedan have to "need a tommy gun"?

 

Your observation is right on, Alsancle!

The silly "tommy gun" association was discussed

in our recent topic, "Car Lingo You Hate."

 

Clearly, old cars were used far more often

for normal activities:  Driving to work, shopping

at the local market, going downtown to the 

department store, visiting relatives, relaxing 

outings in the countryside, and so on.  So, why

do the ill-informed associate them with machine

guns more than picnic baskets or grocery bags?

 

1930s-14th-Jerfferson-Hotel1.jpg

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6 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

So, why

do the ill-informed associate them with machine

guns more than picnic baskets or grocery bags?

 

One answer, one TV show . . . "The Untouchables"   Where more people were exposed to 1920s cars than any other situation.

 

However this (rare) original plate on my 1929 Cadillac stops all tommy gun comments in their tracks  😉 

1931849664_prohibitionplate.jpg.32a0f20f110943b1e649a022b2cd0253.jpg

 

BTW as the owner of a restored Cadillac ambulance, dont ask me what I think about Ghostbusters!!  Grrrrrrrrrr!!!  

Even experience car people shout that at my 1971 Lifeliner 

Edited by m-mman (see edit history)
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I can share a bit of absolutely useless information here.

 

howard.jpeg.7499efe91c3448459e24e7da3a8698b8.jpeg

 

Charles Howard,owner of the original selling dealership was an avid horse man as well.  He owned the legendary champion thoroughbred Seabiscuit.

 

1685097822_charles-howard-admiring-his-horse-seabiscuit-march-5-19402438843.jpg.46002f41b38d57f00daec66dc0324e4b.jpg

 

His grandson Bob lives just a couple blocks from my bar and drops in from time to time for a cocktail.   Bob is a very interesting guy with an infinite number of stories he likes to share.   I can listen to him for hours.   His mother was Hollywood actress Andrea Leeds and he dated Dusty Springfield for a while, back in the day.   He is also an avid hunter with one of the largest trophy collections in the world, which I have been fortunate enough to view several times.   It is absolutely staggering.

There.  Now you know what I know.   :lol:

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Tan Buick was no-sale at $21,000. That's not enough, but the buyer and seller should each consider moving their targets a bit to make a deal and I don't think the high bid was too far off. Plus that car has a LOT of needs. I think seller should take $25,000 and be happy and buyer should spend $25,000 knowing there's another $10-15,000 to be spent before it's ready to enjoy. Everyone can be equally unhappy at that point, which is when you know the deal is right.

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  • 1 month later...

The tan car is very attractive. Figure 40k on that engine, and that's just a workmanship rebuild. So many interesting cars, too little time and space. I would own that Buick.........at a number that would not make the seller happy.

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