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1930 Chrysler 66 trunk handle wood holes


914bren
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My 1930 Chrysler trunk handle uses wood screws to hold the handle on.  Wood holes are there but too bad to hold.  I tried the clay like material you roll together and packed the holes but it did work.  Dry wall anchors may work but the heads are too big to insert thru the truck holes.  Remaking the entire wood piece with the  latch is probably not possible in my case.  Anyone got an idea how to pack the existing holes to hold the handle? 

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I have used small dowels or toothpicks and wood glue. Put a few in the hole, flush with the top. Not sure what the clay stuff is or how it will do with the glue but worth a try.

 

You can also fill the hole with a dowel and glue and re drill the pilot hole for the screw.

 

Dave

Edited by Dave39MD (see edit history)
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On some of my adventures, I have used toothpicks dipped in 5 minute epoxy.  Put enough toothpicks in to fill the hole.  I usually take a complete toothpick, dip it in epoxy, stick it in the hole and break it off.  It will usually break close to flush with the surrounding wood.

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I did the same as Larry--i used some number drill bits to open up the holes, had the tooth picks ready but i used a cheap syringe filled with Quick Poly--had to learn to work quick & not mix to much--I fixed a few sets over the years--Resteration Supply use to keep Quick Poly, but now they recommend something else---Tom

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I've plugged a million stripped oversize screw holes with dowel rod coated with Gorilla Glue, then sanded smooth after the glue dries.  Gorilla Glue is absolutely waterproof and very strong.  I've also used the same approach when building wood structures for our cars like the front seat assembly I built for my car. 

 

This picture is a fixture drilling operation to install dowels in the corners of a new seat frame base.  

FSF 022.jpg

 

I avoided having to buy expensive mortise and tenon tools using this method but you can also plug oversized stripped screw holes, then re-drill proper size pilot holes for screws.  this method makes a very durable repair.

FSF 020.jpg

 

This is what Gorilla Glue does when it cures.  You can remove the hardened ooze easily with a putty knife then sand smooth.

FSF 035.jpg

 

The entire base plate for my new seat frame was doweled and glued with Gorilla Glue.  Gorilla Glue is very strong, impervious to water and almost all solvents.

FSF 034.jpg

 

Wear gloves or do what is required to keep the Gorilla Glue off your skin.  It won't really hurt you but it will take days to get it off your skin and if you get it into some dirt while it's on your skin it's ugly...

FSF 024 (2).jpg

Edited by Str8-8-Dave (see edit history)
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One point of clarification-  In my pictures I show installation of 3/8" dowel rod.  For a screw repair use the smallest size dowel rod that will completely fill a re-drilled fastener hole.   Most will require a dowel rod of 3/16" or smaller.

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