Jump to content

Me and My 1956 Buick Super 4 Door Sedan


usnavystgc
 Share

Recommended Posts

What may help is the part of the FSM that says the ammeter is not a full meter, and thus it is not really reliable regarding the charge and discharge rates.  The FSM also has a section on adjusting each contact set in the voltage regulator.  Those settings resulted in 14.6 Volts on the running engine but I do not really know about the amp output level.  

 

For my 14.6 reading I did just check across the poles of the battery while the engine was running.  But I don't think you can hook an ammeter up that way.  That would probably have to be set up to run the current from the generator through it. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Just wondering is your regulator one of the originals with the screws to adjust the air gaps or a later one with the tabs to bend to adjust the air gap.  The latter are a very difficult to get right….my experience has resulted in making them “more better” but not quite right and all I’ve ever adjusted is the voltage regulator part on the tab units because the thermal compensation on the voltage regulator air gap springs wasn’t working properly.  It was mostly trial and error, just a tiny bit made big differences at hot with headlights and fans on, the cover needs to be replaced to measure the results properly. Wouldn’t recommend that approach, if not careful charge voltage jumps too high at cold (16 volts) and can blow stuff out so for me it was a back and forth trial until “good enough”.  
 

The screw type regulators are easier to adjust the air gaps and when I had one its literally following the manual.  I’ve often thought of welding in a screw adjustment bracket.  There are also solid state replacements but have never tried them. For testing, a ceramic brick resistor for a load from a local electronics shop worked, might have paralleled 2 together to get the right resistance.

 

Somewhere I have some delco voltage regulator adjustment bulletins that go deeper than the service manual on operation because my problem was low to no charge at hot.  If I find them or the link will let you know.  Maybe someone on the team who better knows what they are doing with these things will chime in so you don’t go poof. 

 

edit:  here’s the link http://www.ruiter.ca/mc/info/PDFs/1R-118.pdf

 

See the paragraph on thermal compensation - fixing that was my intent when adjusting mine and was partially successful but couldn’t hit the numbers with the tab unit.  Good luck.

 

 

Edited by KAD36 (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You could also temporarily move the VR from the Roadmaster to the Super just to see if you are getting the same results. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome info and ideas gents. I will have to read the bulletin until I understand it and plot a course of action from there.

I did consider swapping the RM's VR to check the difference and that may be the best first step. 

I am hoping I have the screw adjustment regulator.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I just thought I'd share with you all how far this car has come since I got it.  The first pic is the day it came out of its 53 year hibernation and the second pic was taken about 3 months ago.  I call it a glamour shot cuz it really hides the bad on the car pretty well.

 

image.png.371d0a229f0e4cfffb1a3988607fcb3c.png

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for that link Lance, I did see that post and inquired about it.  The seller is not willing to ship and I have no connections in WI to get it for me.  At this point it is one expensive road trip so, the saga continues.  I did PM him because I may be traveling to IL in early July.  I thought about paying him for the engine now and picking it up when I can but, I don't want to get scammed.  I'm finding it difficult to navigate all the intricacies of buying and engine and tranny sight unseen.  There are so many scammers out there.  I do have another lead on an engine that Willie recommended but, it's in TX and in pieces and needs a rebuild. 

 

The only thing bad about this engine is, its a two barrel intake.  I know I could likely find a four barrel intake and carb for it or put the two barrel on Beaut.  The price is def reasonable so, I'll keep working on it.  

 

Unfortunately, the southwest area was not very populated in the 50's so there are few old cars here and even fewer 56 Buicks.  

 

Collectively, I appreciate how everyone looks out for me and please don't stop doing that.  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I recently saw a 4bbl intake in the junkyard I frequent. I don’t know date or cubic inches of the engine from which it came, but it was in the trunk of a ‘55 Special with a 2bbl intake beside it . I left it as I don’t have a need for one.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Ok, with the brakes all good on Beast, I pulled Beaut into the garage for a front floor pan replacement.  I got the seat, carpet and padding removed and here's what I'm dealing with on the passenger side.   This is the good side.

20220605_200344.jpg.0f00d3df79109d26855956f1d703ea83.jpg

 

Edited by usnavystgc (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, JohnD1956 said:

Did you find patch panels or are you going to custom fabricate them?

I have patch panels that I bought prior to acquiring Beast.  They are not perfect but they are likely better than anything I could come up with.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

The floor pan repair continues. I'm making progress and learning some things the hard way.  The first thing I learned is, the co2 bottle my neighbor gave me is food grade, which is fine for welding except it doesn't hook directly up to the regulator. After running all over town to find an adaptor, I finally found one at a welding supply store.

138163.jpeg.6889c64a377d434ff4f6d2464e62eb5a.jpeg138439.jpeg.6726dc6c4aae489898a04e17a282050c.jpeg

Here's the patch panel cut to repair the bad areas.

137892.jpeg.b8e9a8e59ccce331debb3a928cabd4c6.jpeg 

With that good to go, I started practice welding on a scrap sheet.

138447.jpeg.7711a50553260e58e8370a6bb12aef43.jpeg 

here's what I want it to look like

138449.jpeg.85757e9a0ed06aa41465c42fd998137d.jpeg 

when I get to the point where I can consistently duplicate that, I'll start welding the panel.

I also cleaned up the lower plastic seat trim and repaired some cracks on them.

138484.jpeg.e1cdec9f507607bb0817d8f4d1b50256.jpeg138486.jpeg.31a1bdf560efb5fc1514b89a05eaba21.jpeg138488.jpeg.176e03153c195c0b6741af6c5603aedc.jpeg

Edited by usnavystgc (see edit history)
  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Are you guys ready for another stunner? 😆

 

I finished all the welding and grinding on the passenger side floorboard yesterday and I think it looks ok if I do say so myself. Not a premium result but, pretty good for someone who has not welded since high school circa 1984.

One thing is for sure, I learned a lot like, keep the torch close to the metal, wait for the melt pool to develop before moving the torch, how to set up the welder, I'm an expert at fixing holes now lol and many other things. I spent hours upon hours cutting,welding, grinding and sanding.  Despite all the hard work, it was worth it to advance my skills. I'm confident I can do a better job on the driver's side and once I'm done with that I'll be ready to tackle higher visibility projects on the Roadie.

Here's some pics of the process.

 

Before

20220605_200344.jpg.3a892d6aab26746ba446f07efa74405a.jpg 

 

 

During

1793973121_137892(1).jpeg.efdc7ba8a83099329e454ef0414e6fcb.jpeg138965.jpeg.71c604c65e32d312c46bd9decffba26f.jpeg139255.jpeg.3b0fd264edeeb9620662cead615baeda.jpeg139355.jpeg.9bfcf780b052209c9188fdba5dfe1824.jpeg 

 

After

139382.jpeg.931d05b42e615d511f188dd60e454974.jpeg

 

Once I finish the driver's side, I will prime and paint the whole repair areas.

Edited by usnavystgc (see edit history)
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What a great job with panels and welding, looks really GREAT.

 

You are not going to want to drive that beauty when done OR just drive car around so people can view your metal patch/welding work lol

 

Bob

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't have the welding skills or a welder, so on some not quite this bad I slathered it with POR15 and covered with 3-4 layers of fiberglass.  Perfect after the carpet is installed :D.  I have always want to see and try body panel adhesive for repair...looks to be an option as long as the repair is not structural.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Phil 

Your floor is looking great, you took your time and fit your panel to the door pillar support. This will help keep everything in place when the  door swings out. 

Before you know it you will be done with your floors .I hate rust and it is one of the hardest repairs I have found to keep working on. 

 

Few tricks that might help, if you have not used brass as a backer. Find some brass and use it as a backer when needed. I have used brass it has helped me out when you blow a hole in your work. I have used pipe and split it open beat it to fit an area used vise grips or a magnet to help hold it in place. 

If you are doing much more welding when you need gas explore 75/25 Argon not just Co2 . Google it but it has less spatter and works on thinner metal reduces weld temp. I am not a welder by trade this is just what has worked for me. 

Keep up the good work and stay cool I see it is warm in your area close to 100 

Steve 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)
On 6/29/2022 at 9:58 PM, 195354 said:

Few tricks that might help, if you have not used brass as a backer. Find some brass and use it as a backer when needed.

I have seen this technique and I'm def going to get some brass for the driver's side.  I'm hoping I have learned well enough to not blow any holes.  I have figured out what caused the holes to blow, it always happened when the torch/welding gun was too far away from the repair area. 

 

I really appreciate the encouragement and the tips.  I will also try 75/25 Argon/CO2 when my bottle of CO2 runs out.

 

I got the car tuned around now and I'm going to start tackling the driver's side tonight.  This side is worse than the other side.

 

20220713_193207.jpg.d7f35f87c8a18d234b306baee93d4c75.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by usnavystgc (see edit history)
  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're blasting through the metal, it is either too thin (due to rust eating it away) or your power is too high on the spark.  Usually it's the thin metal.  And all you can do really with sheet metal is tack....tack.   tack...tack....tack.....no continuous welds.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the insight Adam.  That is exactly what I'm doing, I'm tacking about an inch apart all the way around then tacking next to that until it is completely welded.  By the time I finished the pass. side, I was getting pretty good about not blowing holes.  I'm confident I got the welder set up correctly now and my technique is much better.  I can even hold my hand steady now.  :)

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Ok, drivers side is all welded and ground down. Next step is to seam seal, prime and paint.  Once that is complete, I'm going to take the carpet out of the Roadie (since I have new carpet for it) and put that carpet in this car.

 

Before

20220714_211244.jpg.0c20dee163abce0b29a5c065d8bdf570.jpg

During

142290.jpeg.127cdc782cba0380d26b625f06a114a8.jpeg

After

142950.jpeg.9cd6b0a5dc99f63929d4ac1f6c462376.jpeg

 

Edited by usnavystgc (see edit history)
  • Like 5
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

More progress on the floorboards.  I got both sides primed last night.  I think it looks damn good!  The driver's side def turned out better but, that was expected.  Overall, I'm happy with the results.  

143132.jpeg.7f88f90d3e8f1685af8937a039c62c8d.jpeg143145.jpeg.92952af80a1bff23a74608ddbad0ce2c.jpeg

Edited by usnavystgc (see edit history)
  • Like 8
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, usnavystgc said:

I think it looks damn good! 

I agree.  Feels good, right?

 

Now I want to see some sewing exercises!  :P

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Ok all, the sewing has begun. 

 

Here's what I started with

20210722_111201.jpg.52807080b74232178961fc6b22b3997a.jpg

Then, I removed all of the stitches

143440.jpeg.0a69d9114c197d9a5708ae3cd20f7a11.jpeg

 

This is my fourth attempt at the upper backrest, I'm calling this one good.  I have to make four of these (two for the front and two for the back).

20220815_091503.jpg.bd731d555caa66f64258754a3fbb59fe.jpg

Edited by usnavystgc (see edit history)
  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, usnavystgc said:

Ok all, the sewing has begun. 

 

Here's what I started with

20210722_111201.jpg.52807080b74232178961fc6b22b3997a.jpg

Then, I removed all of the stitches

143440.jpeg.0a69d9114c197d9a5708ae3cd20f7a11.jpeg

 

This is my fourth attempt at the upper backrest, I'm calling this one good.  I have to make four of these (two for the front and two for the back).

20220815_091503.jpg.bd731d555caa66f64258754a3fbb59fe.jpg

Wow. How about making six? I could use two for my car. 

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, JohnD1956 said:

Wow. How about making six? I could use two for my car. 

Actually, the front seat ones on the 2 door are different because the panel runs up the face  and curves over the top edge. I dont know if that is the same on the sedan.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

I dont know if that is the same on the sedan.

I do not know for sure because the front seat seems to be the only thing that's not original on this car.  From what I can tell on the SMS website, the sedan is similar to what the back seat looks like with a strip of vinyl across the top and the pleated vinyl ending at the top of the backrest.  The crazy thing is, this pic shows the back of the front seat the dark blue color and mine is light blue and I'm very confident the back of the front seat is original.  The key giveaway is the heat pressed saddle stitches are still there.  From what I can tell, there is no way for an upholstery shop to duplicate that.

 

Can you post a pic of your front seat and what trim number do you have?

 

You know, so far I'm not finding this as difficult of a task as I expected but, I'm not that far into it yet.  It took me four tries because I was picky.  If I can pull off doing this interior, it is more complicated than the RM interior.  That one should go much faster.  The front seat on this one is going to be difficult because it is not original so, I have no pattern to go by.  Thankfully, I have a lady friend that is helping me figure all of this out and it just so happens that her sister does upholstery for a living.  Her sister lives in Ohio but, she's just a video chat away if we get stuck.

 

image.png.e98afbf44993768a3e46c44041f0ffc4.pngimage.png.b8453f7fd3b8d24604fc3871c0aa40dc.png

Edited by usnavystgc (see edit history)
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/15/2022 at 9:23 AM, usnavystgc said:

I have to make four of these (two for the front and two for the back).

 

6 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

Wow. How about making six? I could use two for my car. 

1 hour ago, usnavystgc said:

I do not know for sure because the front seat seems to be the only thing that's not original on this car. 

I hope someone can measure for you if you only have illustrations to work from. In most sedans the back seat is considerably larger  and I don't recall ever being able to just "make four" of something to cover front and rear. On most cars the front/back seat dimensions of any part are wildly different.

 

1 hour ago, usnavystgc said:

The key giveaway is the heat pressed saddle stitches are still there.  From what I can tell, there is no way for an upholstery shop to duplicate that.

That is a mass production thing and I don't think any shop has the capability, although kits for musclecar era cars have the heat pleating so places like Legendary and SMS must be able to do it. I recall in the early 80s when nothing like that was available going to great lengths to save (and sometimes repair) the original piece of vinyl in cases like that.

 

Your inserts look great! Keep us posted!

 

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Bloo said:

places like Legendary and SMS

SMS does say they can do it and I'm sure Legendary can as well.  Fortunately, this car is a practice car,  it will not be restored to exacting specs but, I am trying to keep it as original looking as possible.  Since I'm doing this, I figure I'll do the best I can with what I got.  The RM also has heat pressed saddle stitching all over the place.  IDK what I'm going to do about that but, much of it is unsaveable on the front seat.  It is ripped right on the heat pressed saddle stitching line.  I know I could send the whole thing to SMS but, from what I gather, it's a two year waiting period.  I'll probably do the same thing with that and do the best I can with what I got.  With the car being a 4 door post sedan, the value is just not there for an exacting restoration.  It'll just have to be my baby.  

 

1 hour ago, Bloo said:

In most sedans the back seat is considerably larger 

Well, I do have "A" seat to measure from, I'm hoping when I tear off the vinyl that's currently on the front seat, there will be an outline of the original upholstery.  If that's not the case, then I'll just have to do the best I can.

 

1 hour ago, Bloo said:

Your inserts look great! Keep us posted!

Thanks @Bloo, you'd be proud of me, I've almost got pinpoint control of this sewing machine.  :)

Edited by usnavystgc (see edit history)
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, usnavystgc said:

The RM also has heat pressed saddle stitching all over the place.  IDK what I'm going to do about that but, much of it is unsaveable on the front seat.

I guess I would simply replicate the pressed stitching with actual stitching (says the guy without a sewing machine...).  ;)

 

You're off to a great start and I'll be watching as well, since my '56 Chevy is patiently waiting in the back of my garage for a similar interior refurbishment.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, EmTee said:

I guess I would simply replicate the pressed stitching with actual stitching (says the guy without a sewing machine...).

 

Yep, that's what you usually do, if you can. The trouble is those crafty interior designers more often than not are making some pattern that is physically impossible to replicate with a sewing machine.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So lets say you have several vertical rows of stitching, maybe a couple inches apart that deadhead at both ends into another row of stitching that is rectangular.....  Don't forget you have to lock the stitches at the ends... Or maybe some fake "tuck and roll" (no visible stitching) where the "roll"s are about 1/4 inch in width.....

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...