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Me and My 1956 Buick Super 4 Door Sedan


usnavystgc
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3 hours ago, usnavystgc said:

Could you just take the struts (i guess that's what they're called) off of the torque tube and weld them to the frame so front to rear motion would be controlled?  

To weld the struts to the frame would make them immovable up and down.  Being on the torque tube that is okay since the torque tube can still move in that fashion. But if you welded them to the frame that would lock the drive train or, more likely, just result in breaks where the struts attach to the frame.  And if you were to seriously contemplate all the changes as described, I'd venture to say this was no longer a simple modification and one would be better off just following what the others have done.  But luckily you have a 56, and for what it's worth, I find my Super to be adequate in most every driving situation.   I forgot where I read it but the main difference between a 56 Dynaflow and earlier jobs is the ability to have the extra stator switched when you put your foot to the floor. This works off line as well as passing.  And while it is not like having passing gear as in my 69 GS, it is something you can feel when you exercise the option. 😁

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I do appreciate all that input and everything makes sense.  Although I do see why people want a modern tranny on one of these cars, I personally have neither the resources, skill or desire to attempt it.  It makes me think of what a very wise 85 year old farmer once told me "every problem you fix creates a new problem you didn't anticipate".    When I see articles about people doing it, i feel exhausted and I always wonder if it really worked out like they planned.  I'm also lazy by nature so I'm looking for easier ways of doing things.  This is why my mind wanders to try to figure out how to do this easier (and I have the illusion that I'm somehow smarter than others :).  

 

Ok, back to my exhaust, it is 6/8 of the way done.  I say 6/8 (vice 3/4) because there are 8 pipes to install and 6 of them are done.  The other two (tailpipes) will have to be done by an exhaust shop since the bends need to be modified and I don't have a pipe bender.  Hopefully, I can find a shop willing to take on a small project like this.  I'm going to try to drive it to the exhaust shop (brave I know).   So today will be devoted to getting the fuel system primed, putting the wheels back on and taking it off the jack stands.  If all that goes well, I will be taking the car on its first voyage in 53 years.  

 

Wish me luck.

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4 minutes ago, EmTee said:

Maybe a two-piece tailpipe to allow DIY installation without a lift?

May be.  I think some tail pipes are cut around the rear axle area so as to shorten them up and make for an easier install.  I remember dropping the panhard bar and disconnecting the pass side shock absorber, then jacking the body to some ridiculous height to screw that long tailpipe in, but it did go in in one piece. 

 

 

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You might be surprised at the pickup the 56 Dynaflow has over the 55 and 54.  I added an aftermarket actuator (eBay) to switch the pitch at part throttle and seat of the pants accelerometer at part throttle feels like a 56 in its “unswitched”” mode.  You might find it It’s very drivable for a 4000 lb car.
 

205 radials would fit,  frankly my approach was also budget black walls when first getting the car going because it was apart more than it was together, and that went in phases.  Broken more than working for about a year and a half even after going through everything, then like 10 years of solid service with routine maintenance only, then the cycle repeats.  Curious who you got both exhausts from?  PM if you don’t want to post. 2 trees make good exhaust pipe benders BTW.
 

Keep up the good work.  Makes me remember the first drive my cousin and I took after just getting the 55 going back in 83, we drove around the cemetery a few blocks down the road - the way we saw it no one would get hurt if it didn’t stop, no one would rear end it if it didn’t go, and he could fetch it with the wrecker  if it wouldn’t come home.

Edited by KAD36 (see edit history)
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“It makes me think of what a very wise 85 year old farmer once told me "every problem you fix creates a new problem you didn't anticipate".    When I see articles about people doing it, i feel exhausted and I always wonder if it really worked out like they planned.  I'm also lazy by nature so I'm looking for easier ways of doing things.  This is why my mind wanders to try to figure out how to do this easier (and I have the illusion that I'm somehow smarter than others”

 

Yep - Old cars are a playground for solutionists, improvisors and lifetime learners aren’t they? Very wise farmer indeed.
 

When you said the exhaust was 6/8 of the way done I knew I wanted to buy you a beer. 🤣👍

 

 

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9 hours ago, KAD36 said:

2 trees make good exhaust pipe benders BTW.

 

Ha -- been there!  Just be prepared to deviate from your preferred bend schedule to accommodate limitations of your landscape.  ;)

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On 11/5/2021 at 10:53 AM, JohnD1956 said:

Good luck. Just curious about the 8 pipes. Last i recall each side consists of one engine to muffler, one muffler, and one really long tailpipe. 

John, As @EmTee said, the tailpipes I received were in two pieces to facilitate the installation without a lift.  Unfortunately the bends were not sharp enough and they will have to be bent further.  If the bends were correct, it would have been an easy install.  

 

@KAD36 I got the exhaust system from a seller on eBay (sat1966).  It is an aluminized dual exhaust.  I cant say everything was perfect but, he did try to make it right.  In his defense, I think its extremely difficult to build an exhaust system for a vehicle that's not right in front of you.  The good news is, with a little more bending, I think it will fit perfect.  

 

I would love to hear more about your "seat of the pants accelerometer"

 

Well overall, this weekend was a success.  I was able to take the car for a short drive to O'Reilly's.  I chose to go there since they have been so helpful (and theyre within a mile of me) I wanted them to see the car they've been helping me with.  It was great, all of the employees came out to see the car and they all loved it (despite its flaws).  Unfortunately, the fuel pump started leaking before I even got home.  So as I stated before, I'm gonna let the car tell me what it needs and it told me I need a new/rebuilt fuel pump.  I already ordered the kit from CARS LLC and that will be my next project.  

 

My first drive impressions were mixed.  initial take off was brutally slow but, I'm hoping that will get better in time as she gets wore back in and I learn how to drive it better.  At speed (25+mph) she has good pickup.  The steering was tight and the ride was smooth as the suspension soaked up all the bumps.  This is despite having the same shocks that are at least 53 years old (but likely older).  The power steering functioned great, the power brakes worked very well.  The speedometer is acting crazy, it goes from 5 to 120 to 50 to 115 etc..  it does not provide a comprehensible speed indication.  The fuel gage does not work (reads empty all the time despite 11 gallons in the tank).  Overall, it was a great experience and the work will continue as I attempt to make this a reliable driver.

 

Here's some video of the first drive.

 

 

 

Edited by usnavystgc (see edit history)
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Just for reference I will tell you that if my tranns gets 2 quarts low on fluid it will feel like it slips.  I have had mine a while now ( since 1975) and I can feel this without checking the dip stick.  Just add those two quarts and it's good for another one or two driving seasons.  Meanwhile, I will note that you have to mind your dipstick's cap. Mine has gotten out of shape and slips on the stick. As a result it often reads incorrectly when in fact it is at the proper level.  

And this reminds me that I now have the means to try and do something about that so I will see if I can fix it in the next day or two. 

 

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2 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

Meanwhile, I will note that you have to mind your dipstick's cap. Mine has gotten out of shape and slips on the stick. As a result it often reads incorrectly when in fact it is at the proper level.

Mine totally slips up and down the dipstick and I honestly have no idea where on the dipstick it is supposed to sit so any help here would be greatly appreciated.  Also if you share with me your solution, it would be much appreciated.  

Any ideas on the speedo?  I'm thinking it needs a good lube or maybe a new cable?  I'm hoping I don't have to tear into the speedo drum.  

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I suspect the speedo cable is intermittently binding.  If you can get it disconnected from the speedo you may be able to pull it out of the sheath.  Assuming it's not broken or frayed, you should be able to clean it up with some solvent, wipe it with some new grease and reinstall it.  Otherwise, you'll need a new cable.

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Just a few observations of mine, as I'm also a long term owner of a '56, (June 76 in my case) and I've driven mine over 100,000 miles since then, and it's almost the same as John's. The speedo heads in '56 can give trouble, and that might be your issue, but by all means check out the cable and I hope that will take care of the issue. I did have to have my speedo head rebuilt a few years ago.

 Acceleration is definitely leisurely with the Dynaflow, using Low to start helps a bit, however if you give it some gas and let it do it's thing you might find it is quite nice! Does take some getting used to especially compared to modern cars.

 About the dipstick. I have had the same issues others have described with the stop slipping off of the cap. A careful examination of it might show the small lugs which are supposed to hold the cap in place. Otherwise if you are out to sea one of us could measure the distance from the end of the stick to where the cap is supposed to be. A long time ago I put a couple of small bits of weld to stop it from sliding around.

Keith

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Cable would be an easy check.  On a 56 do you have to pull the dash to unhook the cable?  If so you can try going into the speedometer.  The 55 large series car is also a red liner drum type.  The clearance between the magnet and drum is close and if the car has been sitting for a long time corrosion can get in there and create high spots that will make that clicking sound and the drum will bounce all around.  Cleaning up with a mild scotch brite pad, adjusting the pivot point tension, adjusting the spring and clearance/depth of the magnet in the drum will smooth it out and get it to read pretty close.  My approach was to get it steady (not bouncing), record how far off it was at like 45 and 60, then run it on a bench with a drill at those speeds and adjust to increment/decrement the reading. Mine was off by more than 10 and after rework its less than 5 at highway speeds - good enough for me.  It was actually more straightforward than it might sound but if you step back and look at it, it’s not so bad, however the dash is usually an “episode” to remove.

 

…or you could mount an aftermarket one on the column and people will think it’s a tach 😎

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Oh, when @JohnD1956 mentions something, I'm all ears lol.  I believe there is a lot of merit in what he said and that's def something I need to ensure.  Its def laboring more than it should and its likely due to several factors;

1)  Tucson sits at 3,000 ft above sea level so a carb adjustment may be in order

2)  The tranny fluid is likely not at the right level due to the dipstick issue, it also hasn't had fluid circulating for decades

3)  I never mentioned it before now but when we got back from the initial drive, the fuel pump was leaking (as @KAD36 predicted)

4)  Beaut (the name we gave her) is 65 years old and hasn't stretched her legs in 53 years

 

The goal of Sunday's first drive was to prove she could still move under her own power and to figure out what else she needs.  Right now, I know she needs a fuel pump rebuild (kit already on order).  The power steering pump also blew a seal so that is also on order.  So those are my next two projects.  My biggest surprise was the suspension.  It is still really tight and it seemed in alignment.  The second biggest surprise was that my adjustment of the front brakes seemed spot on since it did not pull to one side at all.  I'm also extremely happy with the performance of the power brake booster.  My rebuild on that seems to be a good one.  I feel lucky there.  In reality, I'm lucky all around.  The fact that I was able to get this thing running and driving in such a short period amazes me.  That's not a testament to me, its a testament to the build of the car.  I also feel lucky that I have this forum to turn to and great people like all of you to help me along the way.  I feel like I'm starting to know you guys and consider you friends.  The collective knowledge that is accessible here is priceless.  I truly appreciate every one of you on here and my victories are your victories.  

 

@Buicknutty I love to see the pics of your son working on the Buick.  You both have done so much to that car.  This car will likely need more work than yours but, the good thing is, this one is virtually unmolested so thankfully, I'm not having to fix other peoples shoddy work.

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+1 on trans fluid level.  Engine speed sounds disproportionately high for takeoff speed in video.  My old college room mates 56 Special used to jump with a slight tip of the pedal. One of these days when time and room permit I’d like to try a swap to a 56 trans but not a priority….

 

Keep after it.

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Ok, fuel pump is fixed and trans level checked.  I am now an expert on fuel pump rebuild.  :)

 

I took it for another ride last night and although fun to drive, I'm having the following issues.

 

1)  The car is still really slow on take off.  Once up to speed, its fine but, takeoff is very slow.  I'm going to keep driving it to see if it gets better

2)  and for the biggest driveability issue (for now), once the car is warmed up, it likes to die if you leave it to idle and then try to accelerate.  Once it dies, it will not start back up without starting fluid.  It does not like hot starts.  The engine is not overheated, just normal operating temp.  I'm reading the shop manual and it says idle speed is 450 rpm's.  Is that right????  In my experience with cars, that seems so low.  It was doing this before I rebuilt the fuel pump and I assumed it had to do with a bad fuel pump but, the pump is now operating beautifully.

 

Any advice?

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The stator is engaged by the linkage at the back of the engine. When you put the pedal to the floor that linkage should be contacted and moves to  pull up ( I believe ) on the rod that connects to the transmission. Make sure that switch is lubricated and moves freely.  And separately, try to start the car in Low gear and see what the reaction is.  You should have a substantial pickup in Low. If you do not then you would be best served by looking for a Dynaflow guy to test the various pressures as per the manual. 

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1) Approx idle 550-600 in drive just generally works better all around especially for cooling and charging if still running a generator and points regulator.

 

2a). you’re in AZ right?  What’s daytime temp when it acts up?  10% ethanol or can you find ethanol free?  Almost sounds like vapor lock if it dies on idle.  And if tough to start hot the timing on the starter switch might be off, meaning the pedal may be having to be pressed down too far to engage the starter thereby pumping in too much raw gas into the manifold to start it.  That’s just a WAG.  Less shims in the starter switch translate to pressing down further on the pedal to engage the starter.  Where’s choke set - cold engine, 70 deg ambient adjust to just before it starts to open.  Choke springs wear over time, and the index setting doesn’t always work 60+ years later.  Where’s timing set, 5-7 deg?  Too advanced can contribute to hard starting although my hunch is you hear pinging first.


2b) Alternatively check the system voltage at hot idle when it starts acting up.  Badly adjusted regulator or one that doesn’t thermally compensate properly, corrosion on the ballast resistor connections, corrosion on points or distributor plate wiring and/or weak coil at hot can result in higher impedances and/or lower source voltage that ultimately robs the primary ignition circuit of voltage resulting in a weak spark at hot idle and it will sputter and die.  Been there, swore at that, took a few weekends to figure out.  Your manual has resistance measurements for the primary side of the coil, ballast resistor, and the hot charging voltage.  Check them over.  What’s the condition of the coil wire and condenser?
 

3). Engine off if you follow JDs post and work the throttle by hand do you see the throttle linkage contact the switch pitch lever (to the trans) in the approx last 1/2 of travel and swing the lever all the way up, if not adjust and lubricate so the lever to the trans is going up full travel less about 1/16 inch - that will engage it earliest without “overtravel”. Can you notice the engine rpm’s change when the switch pitch engages?  How does the situation change when in low?  If you have access to pressure gauges you can take the pressure measurements.  Worst worst case there is an internal failure that can cause interference to the stator that will result in the stator vanes not all pointing the right way.  Pretty inefficient transfer of power.  When mine went for rebuild at 90k miles upon disassembly about half dozen vanes were out of line, all had grooves on them from interference with the impeller due to a broken thrust washer, and the switch pitch didn’t fully engage but the car was still a prime mover with that kind of damage……for 60k miles!  Kinda wore itself in that way.  Another thought is the main control valve adjustment, or if the trans thrust pad/mounts are soft and compressing under acceleration, thereby indirectly offsetting the control valve from its intended position and not allowing full pressure to the clutch packs resulting in slipping.

 

Happy hunting.  Start with the simple stuff first.  Let us know what you find and remember - in stock trim it’s a Cruiser not a Bruiser.

 

 

Edited by KAD36 (see edit history)
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I hear ya @KAD36.  All great advice and I will def start with the easy stuff as I always do.  I'll keep plugging away but, you all gave me a wealth of advice and I appreciate that.  

 

I had to replace the lower radiator hose last night so, that's all I got done.  I'm quite positive it was the original hose.  Its a shame these things fail after 65 years.  :)

 

I took in two rims to have them powder coated then I'll get new tires for them and mount them on the car.  These are the two known good rims of the 6 I now have.  Of the 4 that are still on the car, I'm hoping to have two that are salvageable.  Oh the joy of owning a classic Buick.  I think out of the 4, two will be salvageable.  Wish me luck.

 

I will keep you all informed.

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Another thought - is fuel boiling in the fuel bowl after it’s turned off hot causing an over rich condition and maybe the intake manifold is super hot.  Are you sure the heat riser is not stuck closed on the passenger exhaust manifold?  And there is a stainless plate on the 56 between the carb and manifold

 

 

Edited by KAD36 (see edit history)
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I am sure the heat riser is not stuck, it moves very freely.  I'm not sure the thermostat is working correctly but, its def not stuck. 

 

I do have the stainless plate installed between the carb and the manifold.  

 

Those are def interesting thoughts for me to look at though.  Maybe there is a leak by on the manifold or maybe the valve is staying shut even though it moves freely when cold.  I will check to see how hot the intake manifold is getting.  I have not heard any fuel boiling in the bowl but, I never listened for it either.  I will look into that.

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This one is about as easy as it gets courtesy of Carbking - hot start troubleshooting might get you in the ballpark:

 

https://www.thecarburetorshop.com/Troubleshooting.htm#Hardstarthot

 

Clearly with stock starter circuit in the early Buicks it is not possible to crank with the throttle fully closed but either checking the starter switch timing relative to pedal travel, and perhaps going very gentle on the pedal, may not necessarily lead to root cause/corrective action but rather yield a change in results that could give you some clues where to look next.  Just additional context to our earlier discussion points.   
 

Have fun.  Buy beer. 😎
 

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Well, here's a short update on my progress.  

 

I managed to figure out the hesitation/hot start issues with the carb.  When I removed the metering rod cover, I noticed the linkage for the accelerator pump had fallen off and was just laying there (along with the circlip).  It looks like I must not have put it on tight enough when I rebuilt it so, I'm not an expert on carbs :).  

 

Nevertheless, I reconnected it and installed the tightest fitting circlip I could find and I'm confident, this one will not come off.  The car now starts when hot and does not hesitate from idle.  So thats good. 

 

While I had it out, I also checked the timing of the accelerator switch and it is spot on at 35 degrees (30-45 deg is the spec).  So that's good too. 

 

Now I have a new problem.  When taking apart the carb, I had to disconnect the fast idle cam linkage to the choke.  I hooked it back up and reinstalled the carb and I now either have a constant fast idle or a fast idle once it gets to a certain temp (more testing required).  I've seen several written instructions on how to adjust the fast idle but, all are confusing.  The shop manual seems to be the best description but, I'm not exactly sure how to bend the linkage to get the desired result.  If anyone has any tips, it would be much appreciated.  I want the fast idle cam to work like it should but honestly, I don't think it ever has since I've got the car.  I'm fairly certain before now, it never engaged but, I never thought anything of it since it was hot (AZ hot) when I started the car so I assumed, it was already beyond the required temp for fast idle.  Now that its getting colder, I def want the fast idle to work not to mention, I want everything to work like it should.  So..., I will keep plugging away at that.

 

On another note, Beaut got new front shoes and I had the rims powder coated.  She's starting to look sophisticated just like a Buick should.  

 

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Edited by usnavystgc (see edit history)
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Well,  I feel like I've made significant progress over the long weekend.  

 

I was able to get the fast idle cam adjusted and I'm now an expert on this :).  She starts and fast idles just as it should and the fast idle shuts off just like it should.  I adjusted the normal idle to 600 and that seems to work fine.  There is no hesitation on take off, no problem with hot starts and the engine is really running good.  I drove it quite a bit this weekend and no problems at all with the engine.  

 

I was able to disconnect the speedometer cable and can't find anything wrong with it.  No kinks, and it seems to have plenty of lube on it.  So IDK what to do concerning that.  I'm not really motivated to take the dash apart so, I'm just gonna leave it disconnected for now.  

 

While disconnecting the speedo cable, I noticed a blown fuse for backup lights.  I replaced that and now I have backup lights.  The light for the emergency brake must be on the same circuit because it magically started working too but that was short lived and its now back to not working.  Lol.  

 

As I'm able to drive it for longer periods, I'm finding more things that need attention (drivability concerns).

 

1)  As the engine heats up, the oil pressure drops to an unacceptable level (needle is green and red).  I'm using 10W30 synthetic oil.  What oil do you all use?  I'm thinking of switching to 15W40 to see if that makes a difference.  

2)  When I got the car back to the garage after a long drive around the greater neighborhood, the antifreeze bubbled a few times and spilled about a half pint out the overflow tube.  IDK how much of a big deal this is but, the gage never read hot and the engine didn't feel overly heated.  The gage was just over the halfway mark and still in the green.  I have a 180 deg thermostat.  I think a good coolant system flush may be in order.  From day one of acquiring this car, I've always thought the radiator was undersized.  Do you all have any issues with cooling while city driving?

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28 minutes ago, usnavystgc said:

1)  As the engine heats up, the oil pressure drops to an unacceptable level (needle is green and red).  I'm using 10W30 synthetic oil.  What oil do you all use?  I'm thinking of switching to 15W40 to see if that makes a difference.  

2)  When I got the car back to the garage after a long drive around the greater neighborhood, the antifreeze bubbled a few times and spilled about a half pint out the overflow tube.  IDK how much of a big deal this is but, the gage never read hot and the engine didn't feel overly heated.  The gage was just over the halfway mark and still in the green.  I have a 180 deg thermostat.  I think a good coolant system flush may be in order.  From day one of acquiring this car, I've always thought the radiator was undersized.  Do you all have any issues with cooling while city driving?

Any oil pressure is probably enough; if really in doubt a direct reading gauge for exact pressure can be tried. FWIW I use 20W-50 non-synthetic.

The radiator may be too full (less than 1/2 tank is full enough) or the radiator cap may be defective.  Also do not trust the stock gauge...check at the thermostat housing with an infrared thermometer.

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One more thing, I did try to adjust the kick down linkage to the tranny and I have it adjusted so the kick down linkage is kicking down all the way during full acceleration.  This did not affect how the car drives.  Take offs are still unreasonably slow in "D".  When shifting to "L" on takeoff, the car takes off at an acceptable level.  So... it looks like the kick down linkage is not doing what it's supposed to do.  The lever it moves on the tranny moves freely and I can see the linkage moving it to the stops.  

 

Is there anything else I can try?  Should I adjust it to where it kicks down sooner?  

 

On another note, I've now christened myself as the best damn 56 Buick technician in Tucson, AZ.  :)

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Is the red/green oil pressure while you are driving, or is that at an idle?  If at an idle I would not worry about it. Mine runs just below the H while moving and warmed up at idle it settles about half way in the gauge.  

As for temp I also run a 180* thermostat and during our summer that resulted in the gauge being just to the right of the N.  I had replaced my gauge over 10 years ago and at the time I purchased a NOS unit.  According to the manual the red/green line would be 205*.  Infared thermometer pretty much confirmed my gauge was accurate. 

On the tranny I would say you have to check the oil pressure for the drive gear.  If you have the right pressure there it should not need a rebuild.  Thats not cast in stone though. I'd have to re review the Dynaflow operation section in the manual again and I'd also ask for a better description of that agonizing slow means.  For as many years as I had mine It was always slow out of the gate.  I went through a lot of the systems and did have the trans rebuilt way back in 1981.  The very last thing I found was the hose to my power booster was deteriorated and the clamp wasn't tight at the booster itself.  I replaced that hose and that was the key for my car.  IT was an amazing difference.  At this point mine does pick up quite nicely off the line in drive. Not snap your neck quick but it is a solid feel.  Still, I am not sure you would find it willing to move from the shoulder of the highway into a line of cars doing 65 mph.  

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@JohnD1956 The red/green oil pressure happens when I'm driving and the car is fully warmed up, giving it more gas does not appreciably bring the pressure up.  Mine is just above half when the car starts and at fast idle or driving when the engine is cold.  As it heats up, the oil pressure drops to the red/green area and stays there with little deflection either way.  I'm gonna try another oil change and try a higher viscosity.

 

It looks like I will have to get an infared thermometer and check on the heat/gage calibration.

 

Agonizing slow means, there is no appreciable difference between how it took off in the video of the first drive and how it takes off now after adjusting the kickdown linkage.  If I understand it correctly, the vanes on the stator are variable pitch and that kick down lever is supposed to move those vanes to allow for higher rpm takeoffs or like a stall or lower gear.  I do not believe that linkage is turning those vanes.  I say this because the engine seems to have no power at take off and is similar to when you're driving a manual and you have it in too high of a gear.  The engine struggles to get to its power band and take off is much slower than when you put it in low.  The other thing I think I understand is, when you put it in low, the vanes turn to allow maximum rpm takeoff (within design limits).  That is clearly working and provides a much smoother, powerful take off.

 

I do realize that these full size Buicks are 2 tons of fun and it would take about 400hp and 500 ft/lbs of torque to really get them going but, I don't think it was designed to take off as slow as mine does in "D".

 

When you say the hose to the power booster, which booster are you speaking of and where is that hose located?  The only booster I'm familiar with at this point is the brake booster.

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10 hours ago, usnavystgc said:

 The red/green oil pressure happens when I'm driving and the car is fully warmed up, giving it more gas does not appreciably bring the pressure up.  Mine is just above half when the car starts and at fast idle or driving when the engine is cold.  As it heats up, the oil pressure drops to the red/green area and stays there with little deflection either way.  I'm gonna try another oil change and try a higher viscosity.

 

Did you say you removed the oil pan and cleaned the oil pickup screen?  

 

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Regarding the trans it sounds like the switch pitch linkage is working.  If you don’t hear an rpm change like a passing gear when actuating the linkage from light throttle cruise then the switch pitch is not switch pitching.  Dumb question, unit is properly filled and dipstick cap hasn’t slipped out of position on the dipstick right?
 

Try the pressure tests at the required ports and/or drop the pan and see if there’s any metal or bits of thrust washer in the bottom that would indicate damage.  Does it work any better cold before the fluid hasn’t warmed up and lowered viscosity?

 

Take a look at the transmission mount and thrust pad.  Wondering if they are soft and could be compressing and affecting were the main control valves position under acceleration.  Long shot…..

Edited by KAD36
Clarifications (see edit history)
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