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https://www.thedrive.com/news/41865/infrastructure-bill-includes-per-mile-road-tax-test-that-will-track-drivers-travel


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1 hour ago, ted sweet said:

how will that work with pre OBII  vehicles

Here in PA you have to state the vehicle mileage on your annual auto registration renewal.  Also, as part of your annual safety inspection the inspection garage records your odometer reading.

 

In spite of having the highest state gas tax in the country PA highway funds are not able to keep up with maintenance needs.  This type of plan for mileage based charges continues to get mentioned as gas sales revenues decline.  Supposedly the state gas tax will go away if that type of charge is implemented.

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18 hours ago, TerryB said:

Supposedly the state gas tax will go away if that type of charge is implemented.

 

That would be the only way it would make sense. Of course, getting politicians to forego an existing tax revenue stream will be a challenge.

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50 minutes ago, joe_padavano said:

 

That would be the only way it would make sense. Of course, getting politicians to forego an existing tax revenue stream will be a challenge.

Yes, how often do you hear that old line “but this tax will be eliminated “ actually come true. Here in PA, not very often if ever.

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With all the money they have been throwing around for the last year plus (I can't even imagine the bill for Covid test kits when you test hundreds of thousands of people a day to get a few positives, day after day after day, all to tell you stay home and come see us when you think you are about to die) do you think they will get rid of any taxes? I suspect it will be above and beyond as they have to invest a ton of money into the grid to be able to implement the EV plan they are cooking up.  All I have been hearing is how they can go after existing cuts and add more taxes.  Have to, to even look like you are trying to pay that huge tab Washington and the states are running up. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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A mileage tax would create a huge burden on rural areas. For instance I live in a small farming community - in town in fact yet we have to drive a 20 mile round trip to get groceries. The same for work each day. Their is no public transportation here... period. If we have a serious medical issue its a 326 mile round trip.

 

I love how these people living in the confines of Washington think that the rest of the country is just like DC. Get rid of a tax?? Never going to happen! 

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7 hours ago, Terry Harper said:

A mileage tax would create a huge burden on rural areas.

 

A tax on gasoline is a "mileage" tax now. The difference is that today you're subsidizing EV drivers. If you don't think a mileage tax is fair, what to you suggest? Frankly, the tax should be based on both mileage and vehicle weight, since that's what beats up roads.

Edited by joe_padavano (see edit history)
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If your vehicle gets 20 mpg you are paying approximately 1 cent per mile driven now with the federal gas tax at  18.4 cents per gallon. Here in PA the state gas tax on gasoline is 58.7 cents per gallon. Round that up to 60 cents and you get 3 cents at 20 mpg.  So 4 cents per mile in a car that gets 20 mpg in PA.  You pay a per mile tax now it’s just collected differently than getting a bill for it from the state.

Edited by TerryB (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, joe_padavano said:

A tax on gasoline is a "mileage" tax now.

Correct - the problem is adding another tax on top of a existing tax because you know as well as I do they never will get rid of any tax. The other issue is who benefits from a Federal mileage tax? As it is my State's tax is 30 cents per gallon. That money goes directly to the state coffers for state funded projects. On top of that of course is the Federal tax. (18.3 cents per gallon). The question is will the proposed VMT replace both the state and federal tax or will it be in addition too? The way I am reading it now bill provides funding for pilot programs both for state and a federal program. So who knows what the outcome will be.

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5 hours ago, joe_padavano said:

 

A tax on gasoline is a "mileage" tax now. The difference is that today you're subsidizing EV drivers. If you don't think a mileage tax is fair, what to you suggest? Frankly, the tax should be based on both mileage and vehicle weight, since that's what beats up roads.

The logical way to do this is to continue the fuel tax like it's always been for IC cars and trucks. A transponder method which they want everyone to have should only be used on EV cars. That keeps everything simple.

  I question why the government needs this on all of the cars and trucks. Since this transponder is connected to the car or trucks BCM it will be getting more information than just mileage and it will know where you've been and real time where you are going. Since the the ECM and the TCM are talking to the BCM constantly they can convey through the transponder the type of driving or the type of driver you are, the type of mileage you are getting and if you are emission compliant. Connected to this transponder is a breathalyzer requiring a breath test before every start up. With the ability to control start up via the breath test we know the government could shut you down anytime for any reason.

All of the above can be done on cars with OBD2, but what will become of OBD1 and earlier cars. Will the government let them slide or require them to to do the impossible and not let them re-register when it's time. 

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58 minutes ago, Pfeil said:

The logical way to do this is to continue the fuel tax like it's always been for IC cars and trucks. A transponder method which they want everyone to have should only be used on EV cars. That keeps everything simple.

 

Having two separate different systems is about the opposite of "simple". And you don't need a transponder to collect annual miles driven data, the odometer works just fine (although your cell phone is already providing that information anyway).

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13 minutes ago, joe_padavano said:

 

Having two separate different systems is about the opposite of "simple". And you don't need a transponder to collect annual miles driven data, the odometer works just fine (although your cell phone is already providing that information anyway).

How are you going to collect the data then?

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26 minutes ago, Pfeil said:

How are you going to collect the data then?

Many states have periodic safety or smog checks now. Have the odometer reading at the time of inspection recorded. If inspections are not every year, have the owner report the odometer on the registration renewal form. To reduce the number of dishonest owners, a sizable fine could be applied if/when a discrepancy is found between the owner reported odometer and one done by an official inspection station.

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9 hours ago, ply33 said:

Many states have periodic safety or smog checks now. Have the odometer reading at the time of inspection recorded. If inspections are not every year, have the owner report the odometer on the registration renewal form. To reduce the number of dishonest owners, a sizable fine could be applied if/when a discrepancy is found between the owner reported odometer and one done by an official inspection station.

 

Exactly this. Here in VA, we have annual safety inspections. The shop already records the mileage at that time. As for antique/classic registrations that don't require annual inspections, the annual mileage on those cars is so small as to be negligible. Either exempt them (since collection costs likely exceed the revenue they would generate) or assume the mileage limit for that type of registration (ie, 2500 miles annually, or whatever the limit is). You have to certify this now for your antique car insurance. How is this any different?

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