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1960 DiDia 159


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Well, some could probably consider it a “Nightmare Car” ?  🙄

What were they smoking ?
 

While I can certainly appreciate (some of) the artistry and craftsmanship that go and went into these types of “creations”(?), I tend to wonder about the practicality, if any, they have and whether anyone would actually want to drive and/or be seen driving something like this outside of entering/exiting show field to/from some transporter.
You know, random commute or 100+ mile Sunday drive. 
If the answer is no, should it even be considered a “car” ?

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1 hour ago, 58L-Y8 said:

I recall seeing it featured on the cover and in Custom Car magazine as well as others of the time.  Wonder if Exner influence the customizer or vice-versa. 

As far I know, Exner and his team (along with numerous other automotive designers) “toyed” with many of the features exhibited in this “thing” already in the early ‘50s. 

The problem(?) with so many (most ?) of these types of extravagant “customs” is that the proportions of the “design”(?) and it’s execution are often so much off, it makes them appear more like (hideous ?) caricatures then cars.

But hey, to each his/her own !

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Terms like hideous and ugg, what were they thinking, what were they smoking etc.

It is clearly a product of someone's imagination and talents and I for one think its cool.

So, tell me you would walk by it with out a glance a muttering about some P.O.S.

I would rather own this than any other car in the photo. Just cuz its different and cool. (like me) lol

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Designed by fashion designer Andrew DiDia and built by Ron Clark and Bob Kaiser of Clark Kaiser Customs between 1953 and 1960. Only production part on the body  is a Chrysler windshield, everything else is hand made including the chassis frame. Powered by a 365 cu in Cadillac V8. DiDia sold it to his friend, singer Bobby Darin who drove it to the Acadamy Awards in 1961. Cost $93,647.29 to build and was listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the most expensive custom car ever made.

Love it or hate it, you have to give DiDia credit for commissioning something spectacular, and Clark Kaiser for their work, this being the first hand made aluminum body they ever did.

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Ecclesiastes 3 says  "For everything there is a season..."

It has room for your girl's beehive hairdo (which also failed to stand the test of time) but I am solidly in the approval camp with this one.

With a build cost of $93K, I'd be curious to know what Bobby Darrin paid for it?

 

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Fashion styles come and go constantly. And it is incredible the numerous bizarre things that come around, sometimes more than once. As an antique automobile hobbyist, with interest into the styles and era as well as the cars, I have some insight into such things. Knickers were a popular style for some years during the 1920s, especially popular for sporting people. They continued to be worn by golfers into the 1950s. In the 1920s, they were popular around racing cars as well. I have several original era pair of knickers, and used to sometimes wear them (I certainly couldn't get into them today!). Knickers as a style actually go way back a couple hundred years. Military type or horseman's breaches are another thing.

Breaches and knickers actually fit an active lifestyle quite well.

 

How do I go from Bobby Darrin's car through beehive hairdos and wind up wearing knickers?

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We are looking at it from today's view point , 61 years later.  I am not justifying the styling! But What did cars have then - FINS, lotsa big chrome bumpers, . I remember it in Rod & Custom magazine as a kid, View it from the perspective of that year/era and try to eliminate the rubber painted bumper cars of today that look like bars of soap, or as the my British friends are fond of saying "a half sucked sweet ( piece of hard candy)" . Personal opinion is I don't really care for either. 

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Just about the end of the line and the most extreme example for the styling concepts it uses.  By 1962 the world had gone back to rather "basics".  Every era seems to go a little too far with styling of just about everything.  Clothes, furniture, housing etc. all seem to go a bit much before the end of the trends

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5 hours ago, GregLaR said:

Ecclesiastes 3 says  "For everything there is a season..."

It has room for your girl's beehive hairdo (which also failed to stand the test of time) but I am solidly in the approval camp with this one.

With a build cost of $93K, I'd be curious to know what Bobby Darrin paid for it?

 

442398556_bighair.jpg.9da5fea927bd947c73e427827230399c.jpg

What goes around comes around;

image.jpeg.177686516695e98b8189964bb57c770d.jpegimage.jpeg.3b7d0dc20ef6385899a56cfafcb4eb9d.jpeg

Couldn't resist this one of her Hissing!

Writer David Koepp Says His Take on 'Bride of Frankenstein' Has Found New  Life at Universal - Bloody Disgusting

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Remember the initial design was laid down in 1953, it was futuristic for that year but by the time it was completed the tailfin era was nearly over. According to Wikipedia Darin paid $150,000 for the car but I suspect that was a publicity agent's claim. DiDia and Darin were good friends and I suspect he gave him a friendly price.

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I think I like the front view a little better than the view George showed.  Back in the '70's and '80's, American car guys were kind of embarrassed by customs like this, but now they're fascinating artifacts from a bygone era (and culture.) I don't view stuff like this through an automotive eye, but through a cultural eye (pop-culture, anyway.)

 

1024px-1962_Di_Dia_150_for_Bobby_Darin_(9639953775).jpg.7f20813ee9b890a2e67f84a42b20dee7.jpg

 

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
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In 1953, this basically predicted the 1959 Cadillac. Toned down just slightly (like any concept car that actually goes into production) it would be no more overblown than most late 1950s production models, and more harmonious than some of them. It's one of those vehicles that needs an owner with an equally unique and oversized personality to match. And that's exactly the point of a custom like this. It' supposed to be outrageous, ostentatious, super-expensive, impractical and attention-grabbing. Otherwise, one might as well just drive a regular Ford or Chevy. 

Edited by Big Beat (see edit history)
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