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Timken 1-ton truck king pin set


Gotfredson
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Hello!  I'm looking for a Timken king pin set off a 1923 Gotfredson Model 20, 1-ton truck, which I believe has a Timken 1250 front axle.  Am I going to have to get these machined, ya think?  If so, am I going to have to take the entire front axle into the machine shop, or can I get away with just taking the steering knuckle in?  The TOP bushings are missing in action from both sides.  Does anybody have an old Timken catalog with specs?  Maybe I could get a larger size king pin and machine it down?  Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

 

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It doesn't look complicated. A piece of drill rod with a key way in it - you could then have it hardened and drawn if needed. You don't give any measurements but the bushing is easy to figure out - just the OD of the pin and the ID of the housing. If you don't have the wherewithal to do that, any competent machinist should be able to figure it out. The issue with king pins is that the top and bottom bushings have to be align reamed so, unless you have the necessary reamer, you'll have to take the axle to someone who does.

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What JV P said except I suggest you not bother hardening the drill rod. It will still last a long time and eliminate the problems associated with heat treatment (warpage and scale).............bob

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Were it mine, I wouldn't bother with hardening it. Properly lubricated, with new bushings, it should last a very long time. They were probably made of a relatively low carbon steel, case hardened and ground. Drill rod, which is ground, should give you about 98% of that and would be far less expensive to do.

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Doesn’t get much easier than what you are working with. Don’t over complicate it. Take your time, do it right. Good luck. 

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Posted (edited)

Thanks guys, I will give it a shot.  Looks it's off to a machine shop.  I think that king pin has a hole down the center too as there are threads for grease fittings on both ends. I'll clean it up and take a closer look.

Edited by Gotfredson (see edit history)
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On 8/2/2021 at 3:29 PM, JV Puleo said:

Were it mine, I wouldn't bother with hardening it. Properly lubricated, with new bushings, it should last a very long time. They were probably made of a relatively low carbon steel, case hardened and ground. Drill rod, which is ground, should give you about 98% of that and would be far less expensive to do.

I agree.

 

Huge progress in the composition of lubricants since 1923, making them more effective and longer lasting.

 

Craig

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If nor already in the machine shop, you might try

Hudson-Assex-Terapieces Club---1917-24 Super 6 used that King Pin...as well as

Paige1929-25 666,670, 1729; 1922 2124 2 whl brk 6cyl (Graham Club includes Graham-Paige and Paige)

Peerless 1916-19 56, 8cyl

The same Pin and bushings fir Timken axles 1216, 1218 and 1250..

That axle series was used in a number of trucks, including Diamond T (website dead? but active Facebook group), Fageol and Federal ...19 names in all, and not a complete list

All from a 1936 King Products catalog (engine and some front end parts)...

CORRECTION--Scratch the Diamond T; they did use 1200 series axles bu not ours...

Edited by Bud Tierney
orrection (see edit history)
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