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1927 Franklin 11b $30,000


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Manual transmission
Exterior color: Grey
Fuel type: Gasoline
Clean title
Seller's Description
1927 Franklin. Completely restored to original in 2004, used in 2 parades, then parked. Selling for my mom. Paperwork is in her name and car is at her residence. This car is in excellent shape. Runs, drives, turns and stops just like it was new. Some documentation back to the original owner who was the chief inspector for Franklin, and the original license plates and owner’s manual. Manufactured in Syracuse NY. I also have pictures showing the restoration process. Not many of these left, especially in this shape. This is a collectors dream. I also have spare parts that come with it from a donor car. Wood spoke wheel, axle, steering gear, springs, bumpers, and more. $30k or best REASONABLE offer for all. The car is for sale, not on sale. Do not need to sell.
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59 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

I think he is going to have to put it on sale though to sell it.  Most likely a drastic sale. Franklin made some nice cars but I don't see this one really exciting anyone as presented and especially not at 30G. 

I think he's banking on the provenance.

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He’s selling a restoration, not a car or a Franklin. It’s not outrageous considering the condition. Unfortunately, they rarely bring much money. I have seen some very nice examples sell for what we call “Model A” numbers. Not a total restoration like the one above, but cars that are just drivers.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I love my Franklin but it is a 31 with more horsepower and a side draft engine with better cooling. I notice right away this has much less frame sag then many of the Franklins from this era or it could just be the angle of the picture.  Very nice car regardless. He should try posting within the Franklin club. 

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On 8/1/2021 at 10:04 PM, Brooklyn Beer said:

... I notice right away this has much less frame sag then many of the

Franklins from this era or it could just be the angle of the picture....  

 

What causes the "frame sag"?  Was Franklin still using

wooden frames at this time?  If so, are wooden frames

problematic, and when did they stop using them?

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I like this car a lot. I would like to own a Franklin. It looks nicely done and the provenance is a plus, I just don’t recall seeing anything similar bringing the kind of money he is asking. He says he doesn’t need to sell and is ok keeping it. The color isn’t helping to move it at that price. 
 

there are a lot of other interesting options for 30K. 
 

all that being said, I suspect any buyer would really enjoy the car. 

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7 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

What causes the "frame sag"?  Was Franklin still using

wooden frames at this time?  If so, are wooden frames

problematic, and when did they stop using them?

27’s all had wood frames. I believe most in 28 also were wood with a few steel frames showing up at the end of the year and all 29’s are steel frames. 
 

A Franklin guy will jump in and correct me, but I think the wooden frames have stood up well in many cases with signs of sag often at the cowl area. 

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12 hours ago, John Bloom said:

27’s all had wood frames. I believe most in 28 also were wood with a few steel frames showing up at the end of the year and all 29’s are steel frames. 
 

A Franklin guy will jump in and correct me, but I think the wooden frames have stood up well in many cases with signs of sag often at the cowl area. 

 Correct about all 1927 Franklins having wood frames . In 1928 long wheelbase cars only have steel frames all others have wood frames. From then on all frames are steel until the end. The wood frames are 3 ply second growth white ash and are very strong and durable. They also give a little bit going down the road that is why Franklins are known for a smooth riding car . Where you notice the sag the most is between the hood where it fits to the cowl . Some restorations as of recent actually had an arch built into the wood frame so that’ when the car was finished it was straight . I have a 27  boat tail with a new frame done in 1966 . It still looks good . Franklins are great cars but the people in the club are even better .

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42 minutes ago, Laura S said:

 Correct about all 1927 Franklins having wood frames . In 1928 long wheelbase cars only have steel frames all others have wood frames. From then on all frames are steel until the end. The wood frames are 3 ply second growth white ash and are very strong and durable. They also give a little bit going down the road that is why Franklins are known for a smooth riding car . Where you notice the sag the most is between the hood where it fits to the cowl . Some restorations as of recent actually had an arch built into the wood frame so that’ when the car was finished it was straight . I have a 27  boat tail with a new frame done in 1966 . It still looks good . Franklins are great cars but the people in the club are even better .

They had cable pully systems from franklin in an attempt to lift the sag early on.  Some have tried the steel plates after arching the rails. I only know of one restorer who took the time and do the math and build the correct arch into a set of new ash frame rails that compensated for the weight and future sag.  That car still rides true with no sag.  As over engineered as Franklins were they just never could get this right until the steel frame was put in. It causes no problem with the minor sag you see here and I have not seen one so bad where the engine made contact with the firewall.  This actually looks a little less then "normal" The wood frame cars with double elliptical springs front and rear gives a tremendous ride quality.

Edited by Brooklyn Beer (see edit history)
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On 8/3/2021 at 8:31 PM, Brooklyn Beer said:

They had cable pully systems from franklin in an attempt to lift the sag early on.  Some have tried the steel plates after arching the rails. I only know of one restorer who took the time and do the math and build the correct arch into a set of new ash frame rails that compensated for the weight and future sag.  That car still rides true with no sag.  As over engineered as Franklins were they just never could get this right until the steel frame was put in. It causes no problem with the minor sag you see here and I have not seen one so bad where the engine made contact with the firewall.  This actually looks a little less then "normal" The wood frame cars with double elliptical springs front and rear gives a tremendous ride quality.

 

Ours was a 1917 Model 9-A Touring,

Laminated white Ash frame, as noted by Laura,

and truly an engineering marvel.

I still regret passing it along, but it did go to a good Franklin enthusiast.

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7 hours ago, Marty Roth said:

 

Ours was a 1917 Model 9-A Touring,

Laminated white Ash frame, as noted by Laura,

and truly an engineering marvel.

I still regret passing it along, but it did go to a good Franklin enthusiast.

I am new to Franklins and passed on a 26 open car because I was stupid.  Have a 31 but regret thinking that 25K was too high and passed

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There is a 1926 touring car that just came up on the Franklin website. I drove this car for a week in 2015 at the Trek and it ran great. Fred’s son Mike is selling the car. Jim 

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