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For Sale: 1940 Cadillac LaSalle 50 Convertible - $17,500 - Southern Vermont - Not Mine


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For Sale: 1940 Cadillac LaSalle 50 Convertible - $17,500 - Southern Vermont

1940 Cadillac LaSalle Convertible - cars & trucks - by owner -... (craigslist.org)

Our 1940 LaSalle Series 50 convertible comes from the final year of LaSalle production. The car is finished in blue with a tan convertible top over a black interior, and power is from a 322ci Cadillac monobloc V8 paired with a column-shifted three-speed manual transmission. Built on the General Motors “C” chassis with a body by Fisher, the car features dual side-mount spare tires, a Torpedo hood ornament, running boards, and turn signals.
The Fisher body tag lists a body style of 5027, a two-door coupe, and a factory color of Knickerbocker Gray. The car is now finished in blue with a tan convertible soft top. Fender-mounted headlights and triple hood vents were part of a restyling for the model year, and optional fog lights are equipped.
The steel wheels are equipped with LaSalle-branded hubcaps with good whitewall tires.
The interior is upholstered in black vinyl with a metal dash and features a banjo-style steering wheel, a column-mounted shifter, waterfall dash trim, and manually operated windows. The five-digit odometer shows 91k miles. True mileage is unknown.
Decoding the Fisher body tag yields the following information:
• Style No. 40-5027 – Two-door coupe
• Trim No. 23 – Black leather
• Paint No. 4 – Knickerbocker Gray
The 322ci V8 and produced 130 horsepower when new. The car reportedly sat for several years before our acquisition. Recent work by the previous owner includes a fluid change and replacement of the battery and points.
Please remember this car started life as a coupe and was converted to a convertible many years ago with a period correct top. The side-mounts were added. The mechanicals are good and can be enjoyed as a daily driver but the body and paint, for most people, will need attention. Overall, a #4 car that can be enjoyed as is or taken to the next level. No texts due to scams. Sold on a Vermont DMV Bill of Sale.
Inspection and test drive encouraged.
Reduced to $17,500   odometer: 91000

Contact:  no phone listed.
Copy and paste in your email:   62ea39a549553e8e8bd1c2bc22308473@sale.craigslist.org
I have no personal interest or stake in the eventual sale of this 1940 Cadillac LaSalle 50 Convertible.

 

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Just asking.....

If it was a Coupe from the factory and converted to a Convertible has the frame been reinforced with x-members and such to obtain the proper structural strength needed when the roof was cut off?

Or is the Coupe frame the same as the Convertibles and wouldn't need reinforcing?

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14 hours ago, Joe Cocuzza said:

Just asking.....

If it was a Coupe from the factory and converted to a Convertible has the frame been reinforced with x-members and such to obtain the proper structural strength needed when the roof was cut off?

Or is the Coupe frame the same as the Convertibles and wouldn't need reinforcing?

At minimum, the seller is honest enough to advertise how this convertible came about.  Whether the conversion was done properly would require some study of the Fisher Body Manuals/Parts Catalog.    Though, even without studying those documents, one test drive would tell: if the image in the review mirror is blurry then short-cuts were taken.   If it were as clear and stable as a factory-build, they taking a chance on it just for driving enjoyment would be a safe approach.

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I'm not sure why someone would go down this road in the first place, but even if the conversion was done correctly the cost to convert back to black leather interior and paint would be quite expensive. If what I am reading is correct, the Fisher body on this car is similar to the Buick Special. Sold on a bill of sale would worry me.

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Frame thickness difference between cpe & convrt cpe is, from dim memory 1/64" for 1940 Buick. Same for Cadd?  Wue Hue...No small feat to change. If done factory. Lower roof line, chop windshield frame, and garnish, find cnvrt doors etcetera.

Edited by 2carb40 (see edit history)
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7 hours ago, 2carb40 said:

Frame thickness difference between cpe & convrt cpe is, from dim memory 1/64" for 1940 Buick. Same for Cadd?  Wue Hue...No small feat to change. If done factory. Lower roof line, chop windshield frame, and garnish, find cnvrt doors etcetera.

This is a Model 50, B-Body LaSalle, sourcing the necessary body components wouldn't necessarily have to had come from a LaSalle or Cadillac.  A fortunate find decades ago I have is a auto glass parts book from 1954 that covers cars back to 1939-'40.  Every part is cross-reference to what other makes and models the particular piece is also used by in common.  All glass for these GM Fisher B-Body convertible coupes were shared by:

Buick 1939-'40, All Special and Century convertible coupe models.

LaSalle 1840 Model 50 convertible coupe

Oldsmobile 1939-'40 Series 70, 80 convertible coupe

Pontiac 1939-'40 All P6-EB, P8-EA, 6HB, 8HA Cabriolets.

The windshield frame, folding top mechanism, doors with window components, top well, top mechanism mounting, pillar gussets and hardware could have been source from any of these cars to convert this coupe.

  

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Its my understanding from Researching that 1940 Lasalle 50 series would have been the newly introduced 'C' or torpedo body, similar to the Buick 50/70 series Super/Roadmaster and other divisions use of those designations. Not being Cadd "fluent" Ive only studied Buick & Hollander print publications. There the Buick cars with running boards are listed as Spec/Cent 40/60 series. Please pardon my lack of accuracy. I merely studied Cadds as to interchangability with my Buick 56C two door convrt coupe without running boards. Back to the books, I guess if I want to be sure about correct parts!

Edited by 2carb40 (see edit history)
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28 minutes ago, 2carb40 said:

Its my understanding from Researching that 1940 Lasalle 50 series would have been the newly introduced 'C' or torpedo body, similar to the Buick 50/70 series Super/Roadmaster and other divisions use of those designations. Not being Cadd "fluent" Ive only studied Buick & Hollander print publications. There the Buick cars with running boards are listed as Spec/Cent 40/60 series. Please pardon my lack of accuracy. I merely studied Cadds as to interchangability with my Buick 56C two door convrt coupe without running boards. Back to the books, I guess if I want to be sure about correct parts!

LaSalle for 1940 was two series:  this Series 50 which all have the B-Body shared with the other GM makes.  The new addition was the Series 52 which have the new GM Torpedo C-Bodies which were utilized by every make for their top-line models, except Chevrolet which had to wait until the A-Body 1942 Fleetline Sport Master.  The Torpedo C-Body is the Cadillac 60 Special-inspired four window sedan whereas the B-Bodies are six window including the later fastbacks.

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Thanx! I thought I had seen series 52. Strange that they would place numbers that close for totally different styles? Learning all I can, but now remembering becomes the biggest challenge....

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45 minutes ago, 2carb40 said:

Thanx! I thought I had seen series 52. Strange that they would place numbers that close for totally different styles? Learning all I can, but now remembering becomes the biggest challenge....

You are welcome. GM body assignment and usage in that mid-'30's through 1942 requires a lot of study and having reference to refresh one's memory.   It can be bewildering.

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