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Paint ..Color changes, or keep original?


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Found a car I’ve wanted ..but hate the lower color!  So on a valuable car is it lessened to change the color to another authentic color for that car and year? 
 

Rules? Opinions? Remarks ? 
 

Normally I’m one to keep everything very original, but I totally hate the one color ..

Edited by StylishOne (see edit history)
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IMO if you don't like the color it's OK to change it to another color that was authentic for that particular car. I've done it many times. There are certain colors I just don't care for. Make sure it's compatible with the interior as well and you're good to go. Just my 2 cents.

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I planned to keep it .. but we are all caregivers till it goes to someone else,right? 
I’ve owned n know enough about cars to know is valuable.. the interior is bone color so not an issue .I’m in the design world so picking a suitable secondary color isn’t a problem . The car is all original ..including the drab lower tobacco color . I’d be the 3rd owner .. So what it is isn’t important, I’m asking if I’m ruining anything, or lessening it’s value .. what are the rules ?  What do old car buyers think?

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I would argue some merit in what it is, Corvette guys, for example will beat you with a hickory stick for vocalizing the thought.  Model A guys are generally fine if it is a correct color.  I have lived in both worlds so those two camps come to mind.  

But absent a little more info, worst case is paint it back at some point, the decision driven by what's cheaper, correction or value deduction.

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1 hour ago, StylishOne said:


I’ve owned n know enough about cars to know is valuable..  So what it is isn’t important, I’m asking if I’m ruining anything, or lessening it’s value .. what are the rules ?  What do old car buyers think?

 

What it is is VERY important as far as loss of value. A 30's full classic or a 50's resto-mod are a world apart in loss of value. You also state the car is all original - depending on what it is even repainting in the original color may reduce the value. Do you plan on a total repaint or just the one color. Too many variables to even begin to guess. 

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What is the year and make of the car?   

Is the car itself rare?

Is it a rare paint combination that is seldom seen?  (Along with that, is factory documentation still available?)

 

 

Craig

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Is it the original paint or original color?   If it is the original paint leave it alone.

 

Ultimately it is your car you can do what you want.   But it is hard to say if you will be ruining it or not without seeing the car and your new color.

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How valuable is value-able?  

 

Under $100k? Do what you want.

 

over $500k ? Don’t do it.  

 

between the two values: It depends. 
 

Smart collectors consider how they will get out of a car even if they don’t plan on it.  Life happens. 
 

 


 

 


 

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What is most important to you considering this car?

 

”that I like the car”.....paint it whatever you like best, naysayers be damned. 
 

“the future resell value”....  search auction results and color schemes for trends that paint colors deliver. 
 

“historical purity for the make/model”.....  reach out to the club it fits into (make/model), and get their input on what is original and appropriate. 
 

As an aside, are you experienced in having paintwork done to a car?  Do you have a good idea of the cost to have a professional paint this valuable car?  If not, get an education about paint costs......the color might not be so ugly after all. 

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I've receintly looked a several 1930 era cars of older restoration to possibly buy for a nice regular driver in near turn key condition.

 

Some were repainted incorrect colors for that particular model but the color was available on other body or deluxe models.Some were a pleasent but modern color.

 

This was a major influance on calculating an offer especially when coupled with other distractions from authenticity and what ever the standard of previous work was and what now was needed.

 

I can repaint my own cars but do not want to pay a price for too far out an incorrect paint scheme that may not be attractive to the next guy if I have to resell under duress.

 

Same goes for interiors.

Often these changed details are the "cats meow" to some one who made the changes and thats fine..But they shouldn't expect the same price for a more correct car in similar mechanical and overall other cosmetic conditions.

 

One thing you see is guys put  deluxe colors and upholstery( and top fabric if a convertable) in a standard cheaper model ,same year ,car ,but none of the other deluxe items like trim and fender spares,trunk racks.. etc.

These cars loose there original period styling and charm for me and the (IT) factor that attracts one to a specific thing over another in a buying situation.

 

 

 

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17 minutes ago, oldcarfudd said:

If you decide that repainting it to a color you like is inappropriate for this car, don't buy the car.  If you don't like the color now, you'll come to positively loathe it the longer you own it.


This is very true. My first car was a very nice unrestored 1950 Chevrolet styline given to me by my grandfather before his passing. The original paint had thinned to showing the primer in some places but the car still presented well and I absolutely loved that it was a 44k mile all original vehicle. A minor fender bender created the need for a repaint. We gave the painter a paint code, a sample panel, and an aerosol can of the correct color for the car, he flipped through a paint chip book and picked something he thought was right. It was metallic, off, and just wrong. The car looked great and the quality of the work was better than expected, so I took it…. But it wasn’t right. Within a year or so I had dumped my grandfathers car in a trade just to not look at it anymore, because it began to bother me more than owning it brought me joy. I miss the car, often wish I still had it, and all the same know I would either end up dumping it again… or spending more than the cars value making it right. 

Edited by gossp (see edit history)
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Seems half are for keeping it original, the other  half ..do what I want .. 

 

so if there’s any checking or veining in the original old lacquer those whole areas must get stripped, or is there some other procedure to address that issue?  The crazing in spots on the car is all in the color I don’t like ! 

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Am I the only one who finds it odd that the OP is asking for our advice without disclosing what the car is.  That can make a world of difference.  We now learn  the car has several spots of crazing which would lead me to favor repainting especially if I didn't like the color  Just my TCW which is actually the value my opinion on a car I don't own..

Edited by Robert G. Smits (see edit history)
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7 minutes ago, Robert G. Smits said:

Am I the only one who finds it odd that the OP is asking for our advice without disclosing what the car is.  That can make a world of difference.  

 

Agreed.

After a few requests and no reply on that point, it must be a secret.  Everyone's idea of what valuable means is different.

So given that the OP is reluctant to disclose what his "valuable" car is (1968 Volkswagen?  1932 Rolls Royce?) it's pretty difficult to give any more than vague replies for a vague question.

 

51417510_carcover.jpg.817f735c6460bed254baaae64a4a1dfa.jpg

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1 hour ago, Graham Man said:

Agreed, value is a extremely opinionated topic. 

 

Here is a very expensive car...I think it would not distract the looks at all with brown lowers...or effect the value, might look better?

 

image.png.94a2963da28c78ad30eb862f699ec226.png

Well, if that ends up in my collection, I'll be keeping it original.  

 

 

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Pardon my curiosity, but why the reluctance to reveal year and make of car . The advice you request would be best achieved if the experienced members on this forum had the full information. Particularly as the colour you want to change may be specific to that year and model and as such could be a rare colour and worth keeping if the car is valuable.

However the value of a car ,can be a personal opinion, I value my cars ,but not one worth more 40k probably less if I’m honest ,but within my hobby budget I consider them valuable,but on the open market no. Valuable in bucks is often an opinion relative to your personal circumstance. What’s valuable to me is probably pocket change to Bill Gates and the like 😁

Edited by Pilgrim65
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Posted (edited)

A done or high point car today is 100-150.. they made about a 1000..  no Vette no VW no muscle or resto mod .. the combo is rare but the lower isn’t me .. yes I have the original invoice mentioning the color as built . Paint is all original as is the whole 2 owner car.

Edited by StylishOne (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, StylishOne said:

A done or high point car today is 100-150.. they made about a 1000..  no Vette no VW no muscle or resto mod .. the combo is rare but the lower isn’t me .. yes I have the original invoice mentioning the color as built . Paint is all original as is the whole 2 owner car.

If this is the case, I would not change the color.  Rarity and documentation is in your favor, even if it isn't "you".

 

Craig

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So original paint, I would be very surprised if that doesn't make color change a firm "no way" for 90% of your respondents, and more importantly based on your stated concern, 90% of your potential market.

 

The only other comment I might make is, if it is an original car, the only way to make it less desirable in the eyes of many collectors will be a halfway paint job.  Even a well done job, might seem odd to mess with an original that presumably doesn't need paint, and do half the job.  A quality repaint itself cannot be undone if deep originality is a key feature on your potential car, a color change and partial paint imho, has no resale upside and you cannot even correct it like a restored car, damage to original state is done.

 

In any event, you know what they say about opinions, but you did ask.  Hope it works out how you want it too, that is most important but you are smart not to ignore future marketability on a fairly expensive car.  Someone above wisely mentioned an exit plan.

 

Good luck and do share your secret brand x when time is right.

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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If the car is all original paint and 2 owners, in decent enough condition then leave it alone. If its a full classic you are probably looking at a starting price of $50k+ for a paint job. On a 'high end' car you dont want to scrimp on the paint. Then you may as well make sure all of the brightwork is up to spec, before you know it you are in for twice the value of the car but something that should be an easy sell ( for half what you have into it!). IF you repaint half the car regardless of colour, and the other half is left original I think it would def. have a negative effect on value. I would not pay 6 figures for a car that has half of new paint job.

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In 1980 my '64 Riviera had its original bronze mist paint and it was wearing through. I don't care much for brown cars so I color changed it to the factory maroon. Liked it a lot. I have been getting around to repainting the car after 40 years and strongly considering the original color as a value add for the next owner who may be an heir.

 

As a collector car, one should keep in mind an excellent appraisal rule. How is a Bentley with a Rolls-Royce grille appraised- Bentley, missing grille.

Collector car repainted in non-original color, collector car needing paint. Pretty simple logic.

 

Of course even I know it's never too late to reverse.

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I really don't like the dark blue color on my '61 Merc, but the paint is original, so it'll never be changed, even though it has some scratches and has lost some luster. Learning to live with a color is a lot less expensive than letting it bother you, IMO.

 

I'm not exactly crazy about the gold on my T-Bird. (I think it's called Prairie Bronze or something.) But I don't hate it, either. It's a little subdued, but I like that effect on distinctive looking old cars. I really don't like "LOOK AT ME!" parade type colors, though the pinks on old 50's Mopars or Cadillacs can be cool. The T-Bird's paint is not original, and in poor condition, and the car will definitely get a repaint, but I will certainly have it repainted in it's original color. So even when the opportunity presents itself for a color change, I opt for originality. I'm not a fanatic on originality, though - with the interior, I opted for available colors that were pretty close. I like people to have a general idea of how the car looked when it was new or newer.

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I think I would weld the rear doors shut and put in a 350/350 with a cheap floor shifter.

Then primer it.

This works no matter what the car is.

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It's not just the color that can change the value, it's the quality of work and how it's done. I'll go out on a limb and say that it is near impossible to properly paint a car without disassembling it. If you choose to just mask off trim and not make make a complete job of it, you do it for yourself. The value that you will have lost will be indeterminate. A true car guy will pick up the shortcuts that you took, in a minute, and will act accordingly. IMHO the best way to maintain value on an original car is to do nothing.

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Do what you want. IF you want to drive and enjoy the car, and don't care about value, paint it in your color choice. On the other hand, if you are more concerned with resale value, then the comments made above are SPOT ON. 

 

Me, for example...I LOVED the metallic grey paint that GM offered for 1955 Chevrolet cars. But it was often paired "2-tone" style with a salmon pink color, which I detested. IF I had a 55 Chevy with that color scheme, I would probably change it...UNLESS it was a low-mileage original car with original paint. 

 

But if I had a 68 Shelby Mustang 500KR, or an LS-6 Chevelle, or a mid 30's Duesenberg J, or a Bearcat, or a Talbot-Lago, or....well, you get the idea. For SOME cars the original color is more important than your personal taste IF you are concerned about its financial value. If you are only concerned with liking the appearance of a car you plan to keep, then paint it your way. 

 

The only exception in MY opinion, is that some cars are too historically significant to change the color. We collectors all owe a little something to the future of the car collector hobby. If you found a very low mileage significant car with original paint in a color you didn't like, I would personally consider it a disservice to the future, to change that color. 

 

In the end....do it your way. 

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18 hours ago, bryankazmer said:

don't forget the red polyester velour upholstery

And the suit.

Lines That Bind The Gm Designs From The Bill Mitchell Era Still Influence  Car Styling Today

 

When my ship visited Hong Kong in the late 1960's a lot of us avant garde 20 year old sailors bought similar suits, chosen from men's magazines at the local tailor. One came back to the ship after leave to visit home. He told us he was mistaken for the catering staff at a party.

 

"Atta boy, Billie!"

 

Oh, I should add that I bought the Verde green Continental suit as in the famous song "Cowboy in the Continental Suit". The one with the arched seam across the back.

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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I find it interesting that nobody has asked the owner if this car is to be a driver or a judged show car.  

 

It seems that all previous responders have assumed it is to be a show car, and that resale value will be based on points judging.

 

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I generally don't buy ugly cars..  Unless of course i'm giing to try to fix ugly with a paint job.  Why make excuses for ugly,

it's your car, make it to your liking.

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