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Help a first-time antique car buyer with insurance?


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Salutations kind Internet car folks! 

This is my first topic I’ve posted here on the forums, so bare with me! 
 

I’m a young first-time antique car owner, and I couldn’t be more excited! What I’m not excited about however is insurance.

 

I am having the hardest time getting my antique (1930s) car insured, as no company seems willing to create a policy for me. 
 

my main issues are that I:

A) Don’t have a second modern car as a daily driver (my partner uses their work vehicle as our commute car, or I walk).

B ) Don’t have a garage to store the vehicle (looking at storage units but they require the car to be insured first!) 

 

I’m sure you can imagine the frustration I’m facing. I can’t register my new old car until it’s insured, and I can’t rent a place to store it until it’s insured as well. 
 

Does this mean that in order to own an (insured) antique car, you must both live in a house with a garage, AND have a daily driver in your own name? Seems rather exclusionary for anyone who happens to buy or inherit a beautiful old car. 

 

I can understand the reason insurers have these requirements, antique cars have special needs after all. But it’s bewildering to me that there’s simply no Avenue to legally and safely operate my car until I somehow can afford to buy a new house and a modern car. It’s depressing really. 
 

appreciate anyone who’s made it this far in this rant of a post. But I figure there’s some wisdom to be shared by you folks that might help a youngster like me decide what to do next. 
 

-Taylor

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As a quick work around, just get liability coverage from any normal car insurance place, you only need to pay for a month. Get your plates and storage unit, then call one of the reputable collector car insurance companies to have the car covered. I use Hagerty and have been happy but have nothing negative to say about any of the others. Explain to the insurer that the car is safely stored off site and is therefor clearly not your daily transportation, which is what they care about… they don’t care how you get to work or whose car you use daily. With that conversation you might not even need the original liability policy I mentioned. 

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Insurance is based on zero risk. Insurers simply do not want to pay a claim on anything, is why they strive for zero risk- which I hate to tell 'em, in the modern world that ain't happening. Zero risk is unrealistic at best.

 

Taylor, what state are you in and what type car is it? Every state has its own insurance regulations. Could you possibly register and insure it as a daily driver till you can figure out what to do? Does seem odd that a storage unit requires a vehicle to be insured as most (here anyway) are metal and concrete i.e. fireproof construction.

 

Someone here will have an answer to your dilemma.

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1 minute ago, The 55er said:

Pretty sure PA requires you to have a daily driver with a regular license plate in your own name before they will issue you an antique tag for an antique vehicle.

Yes, it had been that way the last time I went through the process.  With standard license the car will need to pass a regular PA safety inspection which will also require you to show proof of insurance as part of the process.  What kind of car is it?

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1 minute ago, rocketraider said:

Insurance is based on zero risk. Insurers simply do not want to pay a claim on anything, is why they strive for zero risk- which I hate to tell 'em, in the modern world that ain't happening. Zero risk is unrealistic at best.

 

Taylor, what state are you in and what type car is it? Every state has its own insurance regulations. Could you possibly register and insure it as a daily driver till you can figure out what to do? Does seem odd that a storage unit requires a vehicle to be insured as most (here anyway) are metal and concrete i.e. fireproof construction.

 

Someone here will have an answer to your dilemma.

I’m in Pennsylvania, and my car is a 1936 DeSoto sedan. I wouldn’t mind insuring it as a daily driver (if any insurance company would even be able to offer coverage of a 30’s car for that purpose), but it would need to be inspected as per state law, which the car would most certainly fail spectacularly. It does make things difficult for me.  


I suppose I could shop around and try to see about the storage unit, but the question remains about the secondary car requirement. 
 

thanks for your comment!

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Yes, you are the guy that just bought the 36 DeSoto that has the two tone paint!  Congrats!  I would try getting insurance though a local broker that writes insurance for multiple companies.  They should be able to help you navigate the insurance waters and at least get you something to meet the storage requirements.  

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Just now, TerryB said:

Yes, you are the guy that just bought the 36 DeSoto that has the two tone paint!  Congrats!  I would try getting insurance though a local broker that writes insurance for multiple companies.  They should be able to help you navigate the insurance waters and at least get you something to meet the storage requirements.  

Yep that’s me! 
 

I will look into a local broker, we use a tiny firm for my house, and maybe they could help me figure something out. 
 

just a shame to realize I realistically won’t be able to drive my exciting new purchase until I can make enough money to buy an entirely new car just to qualify for the antique registration. Suppose that’s my fault for jumping head-first into a big expensive mess, I had thought I’d done all the research I needed! 
 

That’s life I suppose! 

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Does the DeSoto run and drive?  Hopefully it came with an owners manual and a shop/repair manual.  A MoToRs manual is a good reference too for mechanical knowledge.  Your car appeared to be complete so you won’t have to go looking for hard to find parts.  Good luck!

 

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Why will it fail inspection? I know Maryland is tough, but only has to be done once in your ownership, some sort of consumer protection law, not protection of other vehicles on the road (a real reason for state safety inspections). Here in Virginia, the car just has to have the safety equipment working that was required on date of manufacture, so no seat belts, air bags, etc. Not even a heater/defroster or windshield for that age of car. Lights + horn have to work, brakes and tires good and suspension joints not worn out. No cracked glass, but the glass does not have to be there.😉 Sometimes the inspectors don't know the rules, since all they see is modern vehicles. 

 

Pennsylvania still have to "no rust hole over the size of a quarter" rule? Duct tape and paint.....😉

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 It sounds like you might be under 25, so that could be a problem also.

 Just register it as a regular car. The extra cost of insurance will probably be less than the garage rental per year.😮

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17 minutes ago, TerryB said:

Does the DeSoto run and drive?  Hopefully it came with an owners manual and a shop/repair manual.  A MoToRs manual is a good reference too for mechanical knowledge.  Your car appeared to be complete so you won’t have to go looking for hard to find parts.  Good luck!

 

Yes, the car does run and drive well, no major operational issues there.

As per your suggestion, I did buy both the owners instruction manual, and the reprint dealers repair/inspection book.

 

Light bulbs went out just a day after I got the car, but I was assured that the previous owner had outfitted it to take standard 6volt bulbs so it should be a matter of buying and installing those. The horn isn’t working, and I haven’t found anything to tell me why not yet on my cursory inspection. Those two elements would certainly result in a inspection failure, if in fact they won’t be judging the car against modern safety standards. 
 

thanks! 

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In PA the vehicle will have to pass an annual inspection. In my experiences they check the rust situation pretty thoroughly. Solid frame and body mounts with no holes on floor or trunk. Tires, brakes, glass, safety equipment with horns, mirrors, brake lights, turn signals etc. all must meet requirements. There are tolerances for worn suspension parts (steering play) and also a requirement for an exhaust system with no leaks. A thorough annual vehicle inspection will take at least an hour's time. It depends to some degree who the inspector is but generally they won't allow vehicles with a lot of defects on the road. 

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If it would not have been for a transferable Pa, Purple Plate on the 27 dodge I bought a few months back,  I would have just put standard Pa plates on it.

 

 I've had my last set of Antique/Historic tags , too many restrictions. In the Future If I own it I will drive it when & Where I Damned well please.

below is a link to the Pa, mv-11 fourm

 

http://www.dot.state.pa.us/public/dvspubsforms/BMV/BMV Forms/MV-11.pdf

 

 

 

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Have you spoken to all the specialty antique auto insurance companies about their requirements?  Hagerty?  J.C. Taylor?  American Collectors Insurance?  Grundy?  Heacock?  Before you make any decisions, be sure you have all the facts in front of you.  

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Just now, Jon37 said:

Have you spoken to all the specialty antique auto insurance companies about their requirements?  Hagerty?  J.C. Taylor?  American Collectors Insurance?  Grundy?  Heacock?  Before you make any decisions, be sure you have all the facts in front of you.  

There’s some names there I haven’t tried yet, so I’ll def add to my call list for Monday morning. Thank you!

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All insurance applications are designed to allow the company to offer theri lowest rates to the applicant who offers them the lowest risk of accidents and claims.   The colllector car policies do the same thing.  They want experienced drivers with the garaged vehicles that are only occasionally driven to shows and antique car club functions.   The specialty compsanies are all pretty standard in seeking those same risks.

Some regular car insurance companies will offer coverage for this DeSoto risk, but will have other requirements, like drivers age,

other insurance with that company, etc.   Most States have "Assigned Risk" plans for those who can't obtain insurance elsewhere.

However, Their rates will be high because nobody else would take the risk.  It's all about risk!.  Their requirements lower the risk that they assume when they issue a policy.

It's like wanting to be a NFL Quarterback, you have to qualfy and meet the requirements in additon to loving football.

 

 

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1 hour ago, DecoDog said:

if in fact they won’t be judging the car against modern safety standards. 
 

 

 In Ma., the car only has to have the standard equipment that came with the car.

 My 31 Essex only has one taillight and is legal. (I did all though, add hidden signal lights and a "third" brake light.

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I'm from Pennsylvania myself, and similarly, I bought

my first antique car not long after college graduation.

Some encouragement:

 

---You could register your old car in your parents' name.

My first couple of old cars were done that way.

---Garage rentals in McKean County should be $50 a month

(maybe less) if you do some searching.  There's no need to pay

the much higher cost of a rental unit:  Anyone with an extra

garage bay will be fine, and they likely won't need proof of

insurance.  An elderly neighbor using only one bay of a 2-car

garage may work well.

---Antique cars don't need to be inspected in Pennsylvania, 

since owners take especially good care of them and they get

driven much less than regular cars.  

---In Penna. the state registration is permanent.  Pay the fee once

(about $75) and never again as long as you own that antique car.

---Antique car insurance is very economical.  Yours may be less

than $100 a year with one of the major antique-car insurers noted 

above.

---Antique insurance and antique registration are unrelated,

at least here in Penna.  Your car can be registered as a regular car

(non-antique) if you choose to do so, but I see no advantage in that. 

Only regular registrations require an annual inspection. 

Or you could have regular insurance and antique registration,

though I recommend antique insurance and antique registration.

 

The only detraction:  An antique-car insurance company

 probably WILL want you to have a regular driver.  But it's worth

checking around.  And having a regular driver is not a problem

if the car is registered with your parents, who surely have a regular

driver. 

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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John in PA,

If you still live with your parents that may work out OK.   If not, what you are suggesting could be considered Fraud, they would probably drop your partents too.   Separte households, separate policies.   The application is a statement of fact by the applicant

and they check things out during underwriting.   Be carefull what you attest to in any insurance application, it's a legal document.

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When selecting the type of registration plate and insurance to obtain, I think it is important to consider how you will be using the car.  Pennsylvania law states:

 

"It is unlawful for any person to operate a motorcycle or vehicle with antique, classic, vintage, collectible or historic military vehicle registration plates for general daily transportation. Permitted use shall be limited to participation in club activities, exhibits, tours, parades, occasional transportation and similar uses. Occasional transportation shall mean no more than one day per week."

 

You will find that many of the "collector car" insurance policies have similar restrictive wording.

If your intended use of the car fits within the restrictions, then you can save some money with 'antique' plates and 'Collector' insurance. 

 

You might also consider what you want to protect with the policy.  Of course, the state requires you to have liability and perhaps other, such as medical cost, insurance.  As purely a used car, an insurance company will place very little value on the vehicle itself, so a 'normal' policy may be all you need if you just want to meet the state requirements.  Essentially, this would leave you "self-insured" for your damage or loss to your own car.   If this is the case, see a local agent as others have suggested.   Yes, you may have to get a 'normal' plate for your 'used car', and be subject to safety inspection, but hey, if it is a daily driver, do you really want to be in a car that does not meet minimum safety requirements?  (It has been a long time since I lived in PA, but the law used to require that lighting on used cars only had to meet the standards to which it was manufactured.  All other current safety inspection standards applied.  Your local inspection station can fill you in on this.)

 

 If you want to protect your expenditure on car, then you will need a specialty policy from one of the aforementioned 'collector car' insurers.  I don't know any of them that don't have use restrictions, and just about all require garaging.  For a relatively low-value car, parked outdoors, you might just accept the risk of property loss, and just go with the state minimums.

 

I agree with the suggestion of going on your parents' or your partner's policy as a possibility.

 

Good luck!

 

Andrew

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22 minutes ago, Paul Dobbin said:

If you still live with your parents that may work out OK. 

 

It's not fraudulent in my view.  If registered in your father's 

name, it's legally his car.  He could sell it if he really chose to.

Similarly, if a person drives a car registered to the

family farm LLC, it legally belongs to the farm.  The farm 

could assign you a horse-trailer instead.

If you live in a rental house owned by your grandfather,

it legally belongs to your grandfather.  He could evict you.

Maybe someone with a law degree in Penna. could tell us more.

 

Long-time collectors always want younger collectors in the hobby.

When they get antique cars, there must be a way for them to

possess them, insure them, and drive them!

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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Deco Dog didn't describe his living situation that way.   I'm not a lawyer but I was a Claims Investigater, then an agent for 30 years.  If I suspected deciet, I would not write that policy.  Remember Insurance agents pay is adjusted for loss ratio.   We want the insured to get what they paid for and the company too.   it's mutual trust thing via contract.

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I insure my 1927 Willys Knight with Hagerty’s, and for $145.00 a year premium, which includes roadside service and towing, I’m super satisfied and I will soon add my 1923 Dodge Roadster to the policy also. The policy allows plenty of latitude to drive the car as a antique or horseless carriage, but also requires a second, primary, vehicle be registered to the owner. I have absolutely no gripe about this because I drive my antiques for fun, and my primary car for everything else. If you intend on using your classic as a primary use vehicle, insure it as a primary use vehicle, and, assuming you will use it enough to justify the higher policy rate, enjoy having adequate coverage regardless of who provides it.

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17 hours ago, Akstraw said:

When selecting the type of registration plate and insurance to obtain, I think it is important to consider how you will be using the car.  Pennsylvania law states:

 

"It is unlawful for any person to operate a motorcycle or vehicle with antique, classic, vintage, collectible or historic military vehicle registration plates for general daily transportation. Permitted use shall be limited to participation in club activities, exhibits, tours, parades, occasional transportation and similar uses. Occasional transportation shall mean no more than one day per week."

 

You will find that many of the "collector car" insurance policies have similar restrictive wording.

If your intended use of the car fits within the restrictions, then you can save some money with 'antique' plates and 'Collector' insurance. 

 

You might also consider what you want to protect with the policy.  Of course, the state requires you to have liability and perhaps other, such as medical cost, insurance.  As purely a used car, an insurance company will place very little value on the vehicle itself, so a 'normal' policy may be all you need if you just want to meet the state requirements.  Essentially, this would leave you "self-insured" for your damage or loss to your own car.   If this is the case, see a local agent as others have suggested.   Yes, you may have to get a 'normal' plate for your 'used car', and be subject to safety inspection, but hey, if it is a daily driver, do you really want to be in a car that does not meet minimum safety requirements?  (It has been a long time since I lived in PA, but the law used to require that lighting on used cars only had to meet the standards to which it was manufactured.  All other current safety inspection standards applied.  Your local inspection station can fill you in on this.)

 

 If you want to protect your expenditure on car, then you will need a specialty policy from one of the aforementioned 'collector car' insurers.  I don't know any of them that don't have use restrictions, and just about all require garaging.  For a relatively low-value car, parked outdoors, you might just accept the risk of property loss, and just go with the state minimums.

 

I agree with the suggestion of going on your parents' or your partner's policy as a possibility.

 

Good luck!

 

Andrew

And, unless you plan on having a accident, or getting a ticket every day, during a seven day week….that pretty well leaves open which day, or how many consecutive days, can be legally defined as “one” day a week. And my policy also allows for road tests to determine maintenance needs/effectiveness. If it takes fifty miles, and stops at 6 burger joints, while test driving it, being old car people, I’m sure a insurance company will understand if you drive the car more than down the block.

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When I was in this same boat, around 20 years ago, I first bought a beater "modern" car that just barely passed inspection.  Cost me $900.  (That "modern" car was a 1981 Volvo that is now an antique! :)Then a friend's wife's mom had a garage in the area where she let me park for a few months while I found a more permanent garage solution.   I used the "modern" car to drive over to the garage where I could take out the antique car for a drive....

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All mostly good advice. Cant add a whole lot other than I have Grundy and you do indeed need to keep the car in an enclosed space, and have a primary car in addition to the antique. Although Grundy has no driving restrictions other than it cannot be a daily driver.

 

I think the idea of finding spare space in a garage is a great idea. Maybe post at a few local churches. There may be someone willing to part with a spot for $30-$50 a month. That should take care of that. Perhaps talk to an agent regarding the daily driver situation. Explain that you can and do walk to work and a daily driver is not needed. They may have a form you can sign that will state you will not use it as a daily driver, similar to a no loss statement.

 

If you can and do put regular tags that require a safety inspection and may need to 'fix' a couple of things, is that really a bad thing?

 

Good Luck

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Bottom line is that if you are going to use it as a daily driver, in PA, it must be registered as a regular vehicle, which means it will have to pass inspection and be insured. You'd be foolish to just get liability insurance and then risk having an accident that could destroy the car with no coverage . All lights, turn signals will have to be brought up to modern standards and in some areas, it will have to pass a pollution test. As far as I know, there's no way around that. I really think that you'd be further ahead to buy yourself a good modern car as a daily driver as a '36 Desoto, while being a nice car, will not suffice as your only car, both in reliability and traffic speed. These cars can be hard to find parts for and  even harder to find someone who will be willing to repair it if it breaks down, unless you are mechanically knowledgeable. Enjoy the car as a hobby car and insure it with one of the collectable car insurance companies. They will give better coverage at  a much lower price. As far as PA antique tag restrictions, I found out that they really don't watch that closely, as I used to drive my "A" alot. Then one must ask, define one day a week and you still have to have modern lights to drive at night.  Still, one has to follow the guidelines. The state does not limit mileage. I've found that the insurance companies put far more restrictions on the vehicle than the state, including mileage. Where in PA are you located?

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1 hour ago, jpage said:

Bottom line is that if you are going to use it as a daily driver, in PA, it must be registered as a regular vehicle, which means it will have to pass inspection and be insured. You'd be foolish to just get liability insurance and then risk having an accident that could destroy the car with no coverage . All lights, turn signals will have to be brought up to modern standards and in some areas, it will have to pass a pollution test. As far as I know, there's no way around that. I really think that you'd be further ahead to buy yourself a good modern car as a daily driver as a '36 Desoto, while being a nice car, will not suffice as your only car, both in reliability and traffic speed. These cars can be hard to find parts for and  even harder to find someone who will be willing to repair it if it breaks down, unless you are mechanically knowledgeable. Enjoy the car as a hobby car and insure it with one of the collectable car insurance companies. They will give better coverage at  a much lower price. As far as PA antique tag restrictions, I found out that they really don't watch that closely, as I used to drive my "A" alot. Then one must ask, define one day a week and you still have to have modern lights to drive at night.  Still, one has to follow the guidelines. The state does not limit mileage. I've found that the insurance companies put far more restrictions on the vehicle than the state, including mileage. Where in PA are you located?

Hey there! 
Definitely not looking to daily drive a 1930s car for all the reasons you outlined, I just find it rather silly that there’s so many restrictions to protecting it. I don’t mind driving the car very sparingly and having that be enforced, but the idea that somehow not having a modern car titled in my name instantly means I’m going to be using my collector car as some sort of cheap commute workaround is absurd. I’ve been getting around town, to work, on trips, etc perfectly fine without my own vehicle and can continue to do so. So while I understand the reasoning for the various enforcements and eligibility requirements, I am a little frustrated at the extremely limited options I have if I want to be able to enjoy my car as a young person without waiting 2 years, buying a new car, or building/renting a garage.
 

and to answer your question I’m in McKean County in PA! :D 

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Just register it as a 1936 DeSoto with no antique restricted license or antique insurance.  There is no emissions inspection for that year of car.  See an insurance broker for the coverage you need to get a regular policy to drive it.  Getting insurance on the value of the car itself might be tough to find but getting liability insurance should be doable.  Get the things needed to pass PA inspection fixed, many old cars had an external horn button added when the original horn button quit working.  If the lights don’t work it could be loose bulbs, bulbs that were old and burnt out or the charging system is having issues and needs attention.  You have to realize that a car this old is going to need regular attention to be used.  Be sure to find an inspection station that knows how to work on old cars.  The rear brakes require a special puller to remove the drum to inspect the lining.  Too often the axle end gets beat up by those who don’t know what they are doing.

Good luck!

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26 minutes ago, TerryB said:

Just register it as a 1936 DeSoto with no antique restricted license or antique insurance.  

 

I would give the opposite advice:  Register it as an antique

car, since you're not using it as a regular driver.

There are great benefits to doing so.

 

As I noted previously, in Penna. the car can still, then,

have either antique insurance or regular insurance.

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Let's get to the heart of this matter. The reason why both antique registration and antique car insurance are less expensive than for conventional cars is because both come with use restrictions that limit risk. Either you accept those limitations in exchange for the lower cost or you pay the higher cost for fewer restrictions. In the case of insurance, the insurance company is in business to make money. They will do everything they can to reduce the chances that you will make a claim, because that increases their profits. That's how a business works. If you don't have a conventional daily driver, they will assume that you will be using the antique car more than the mileage limits allow. If you don't have indoor storage, they will (correctly) assume that there is a higher risk that the car will be damaged. And don't expect to get collision insurance for an older car on a conventional policy, since their actuaries have no way to quantify the potential accident repair costs for that car. There is no current flat rate manual that covers an antique car. There is no ready source of replacement body parts. How can an insurance company even begin to calculate risk and premiums in that situation? That's why antique car insurance puts severe limits on use - if you aren't driving the car in daily commuter traffic, your accident risk goes down to a low enough level that they can accept the risk. Common sense, people.

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2 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

I would give the opposite advice:  Register it as an antique

car, since you're not using it as a regular driver.

There are great benefits to doing so.

 

As I noted previously, in Penna. the car can still, then,

have either antique insurance or regular insurance.

Sorry John, I don’t agree at this point.  If going antique to avoid making it inspection passing condition and road worthy is not a good idea to me.  Getting it sorted and then going the antique route seems like a better plan.  If the poster wants to get this thing licensed and on the road there are several ways to pursue.  A regular PA license is like $59 or something close to that? The issues are insurance availability and road worthy sorting.  I’m hoping he goes the roadworthy route for his own safety and others on the highway with him.

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On 7/25/2021 at 3:02 PM, 1935Packard said:

When I was in this same boat, around 20 years ago, I first bought a beater "modern" car that just barely passed inspection.  Cost me $900.  (That "modern" car was a 1981 Volvo that is now an antique! :)Then a friend's wife's mom had a garage in the area where she let me park for a few months while I found a more permanent garage solution.   I used the "modern" car to drive over to the garage where I could take out the antique car for a drive....

That is exactly what I was going to suggest. 

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As an update:

 

After lots of calling and lots of dead ends, I managed to get a policy offer from progressive through a local firm. The insurance is not specifically antique car insurance, but I don’t consider that a problem. The premium is really rather expensive but for all the reasons that were explained by others it makes sense for someone in my position. Now I haven’t received the insurance card yet, which I am supposed to get today if all things go well, but I’ve already made progress with the notary on registration. 
 

they suggested I register as BOTH normal and antique, and explained that although I technically need to have it inspected, no one will give me a hard time about it between now and when my antique plates are ready in 6 months (Yowch what a long time!). The idea being I can use the modern plates as a temp way to drive the car to get ice cream or go to the state park for the summer rather than have my car sit around during the nice months. 
 

Seems I’m on the right track here, and although things have gotten more expensive than I had anticipated, I’m more than willing to make it work for the sake of being able to enjoy and protect my new pride and joy! 

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4 hours ago, DecoDog said:

I just find it rather silly that there’s so many restrictions to protecting it.

Remember, the rules weren't written specifically for you. They were written for those whom came before. Your elders connived, stretched the rules, misinterpreted, or just plain lied to take advantage of the low rates. There are people out there today who buy a 25 year old car, truck, or camper just to get the cheap rate. And you don't have to look very far to find one.

 

You are young. Start early and learn the rules, follow them. Along with the insurance, pay the proper tax due. Don't start life groveling around begging for a gift tax form or a $100 receipt. In later years you may find it puts you in a group you really don't want to be in.

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1 minute ago, 60FlatTop said:

Remember, the rules weren't written specifically for you. They were written for those whom came before. Your elders connived, stretched the rules, misinterpreted, or just plain lied to take advantage of the low rates. There are people out there today who buy a 25 year old car, truck, or camper just to get the cheap rate. And you don't have to look very far to find one.

 

You are young. Start early and learn the rules, follow them. Along with the insurance, pay the proper tax due. Don't start life groveling around begging for a gift tax form or a $100 receipt. In later years you may find it puts you in a group you really don't want to be in.

Couldn’t agree more, I have the innate desire to do the RIGHT things rather than the easiest. I don’t mind paying more, stressing more etc. I’m one of those people who worry about everything and if I was trying to game the system I think I’d probably die of a heart attack just from the guilt and stress xD 

 

It’s unfortunate that there’s people out there who make things harder for the good folks, but that’s life I suppose. 

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In spite of their goofy TV commercials the one time I had a claim with Progressive they were A1 professional with their service.  That was 9 years ago, I hope they are still that good today.  You never know how good or bad your insurance is until you need it.

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Insurance companys.....GRRR

All smiles and good hands to sell you, but will refuse you when you need them for some fine print that we missed.

To me its one of the most required rip offs this country forces on us.

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Im glad its working out for you and sounds like you have a good, intelligent plan of attack.  As has been stated above, rules are there for a reason.  Things are a bit different with younger generations (no offense meant) than probably what a lot of us are used to. You stated that you dont have a daily driver car and that you make out just fine without one. In my day ( Im almost 60) living in the suburbs a car was necessary. We had ride sharing but it was a buddy that had gas in his car. But you, like a lot of your peers have found a way to make do without. I was selling real estate a few years ago and a 25 year old girl was buying her first house. Although she had the money she had no idea what a walk in bank was. Everything to her was done online. Maybe its time for the insurance companies to look at things more on an individual basis than a broad sweep of the pen.

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