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What year is this Chevy pickup?


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The Log hauler looks like a Hayes our Pacific . Not 100% sure . They use a water spray system on the brakes so they do not heat up too much and lose the brakes . There are small upright steel posts holding the logs then chained down to the truck . The drivers who drove them had no fear . 

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34 minutes ago, Laura S said:

The Log hauler looks like a Hayes our Pacific . Not 100% sure . They use a water spray system on the brakes so they do not heat up too much and lose the brakes . There are small upright steel posts holding the logs then chained down to the truck . The drivers who drove them had no fear . 

I live in Oregon and see log trucks with the steel posts often. They don’t stack them this high anymore though. Interesting about the water on the breaks. Thanks for the info. 

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4 hours ago, victorialynn2 said:

I live in Oregon and see log trucks with the steel posts often. They don’t stack them this high anymore though. Interesting about the water on the breaks. Thanks for the info. 

The logs today probably aren't that big either.

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When I look at that picture I know that I wouldn't part where the pickup is.

 

It makes me think of the dog owner who says "Oh, he's nice. He wouldn't hurt a fly".

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Neither. Most of the ‘41-‘46 Chevy and gmc trucks started with painted grilles. But over 75 years, things get changed. The factory chrome grilles tended to deteriorate and flake. Various aftermarket grilles were sold and were even worse. Of course, you can get a great chrome job now for $2500 or so.

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4 hours ago, TAKerry said:

And they may be all from the same tree!

Very likely. Redwoods grow over 200’ high. They are probably 40’ cuts x 6 for 240’ total. 
 

The loads I see today are closer to this picture. 
 

I remember when I was young and saw really big logs on trucks, people jokingly called them “Oregon toothpicks”. 

74F18CBB-F21E-47E9-9B00-AB49C4F387C2.jpeg

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Most of North Carolina was clear cut in the 20'& 30's, except for the Joyce Kilmer National Forest where the terrrain was to steep to get the logs out if cut.   Fun to hike there with trees like pictured above.  Many trees

with a 17' circumfrence.  I have 3 of these trees on our property and people come to see them.  Two Tulip

Poplars and one White Oak and I'm not going to cut them down!

Edited by Paul Dobbin (see edit history)
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We don't have big trees up here in Maine but logging is still a big part of the economy and culture.

 

From a recent trip to the Northwoods... I think this is the fastest I have ever ridden in a truck going in reverse. Up here the roads are private but have public access. The trucks ALWAYS have the right-of-way. Many never run on public roads so extra wide bunks and double trailers are not uncommon.

 

 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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