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Pinstripe 65 Riviera panels


kreed
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Hi all - restoring a 65 GS and bought a nice set of unstained matched walnut panels from James Kehr at BestOfferCounts ( whom I highly recommend ) I stained and cleared them . They did not have the pinstripe and I had a very good friend add the  pinstripe for me  . Returned to day and I am very pleased . If anyone is interested , I am happy to supply his name and contact info by PM as he said he would be happy to do others if needed . . Pardon the glare on my pics but he really nailed the stripe IMO . 
KReed 

ROA 14549

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When I bought the Riv 26 yrs ago the rear panels had no lines & the front's were somewhat faded. Recently I had the door cards & rear panels off. Since I intended to replace the wood one day I decided to experiment. After practicing on a similar surface I was able to create convincing lines w a sharpie & a straightedge. I might not recommend this "technique" for new panels but if you have a steady hand it works well for a spruce up. (no wood pun intended)

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OK Riviera People: Here's how I did mine. I got a roll of wood veneer from a pal who just remodeled a high end kitchen. I cut it to fit the metal backing piece, sprayed 3-M glue on it and stuck the wood on. Got some dark Minwax and stained it.  Well, at first it looked good but not excellent. It turned to crap after a while.

 

 

Second try.  This was for a pal's 65 Riv, NOT MINE.   I got a sheet of veneer from a high end wood store  https://www.macbeath.com/ .  It's  probably more than a pair of kits now with lumber stupid as it it today. It has the 3-M glue and stick-um on the back already. I cut it to fit and stuck it on.  This was a 65 so it needed the stripes.  

 

First I stained it my favorite shade and after it dried i went to the detail supply guy and got a roll of Cal Custom striping tape. I mimicked the original dimensions from the busted up pieces and applied. Next was clear, let dry, wet sand with fine grit sandpaper like 1500 and polish.  WA-LA

 

A 63 and 64 have the black paint on the stainless surround so that wasn't an issue for a 65 which is bare metal so I polished the surround with Wenol metal polish and a microfiber towel.  

 

It looks very good.  The plan?  For my 65 Riv I always wanted a "Motorama" style interior so all the vinyl is gonna be done in leather, cut pile carpets and a plush style headliner.  Well......that's the plan someday.  ANY SUGGESTIONS  on how to help me achieve my goal?  I have a "vision" but it's kinda cloudy.   haha

 

 

Mitch

 

 

Edited by lrlforfun (see edit history)
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Your panels look very nice.  I'm considering the same purchase but didn't know they will need to be stained.  Would you mind sharing what brand and color of stain you used?  Also, did you use aerosol or brush on for the clear coat.  Thanks.

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James Kehr (BestOfferCounts) has the  complete set ( console and panels ) stained and unstained . I lightly sanded and then used a medium walnut stain from Home Depot and brushed it on with a 2 inch foam brush (two coats ) and sanded again very lightly and then rattle canned  the clear . My guy striped then after very lightly sanding (2000 grit) the clear . Did not reapply clear after Pinstriping. Good luck 

KReed

ROA 14549

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I have one of these and have used it on bicycle rims, fenders, etc.  You can adjust the guide for distance from the edge or add or subtract the number of wheels to adjust the width of the stripe. (I’ve made guides out of finish nails so the tool will have a greater reach.) Testors enamel model paint in those small bottles works great.  Just practice to get the feel before going for the gold.

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  • 2 weeks later...
2 hours ago, Kevrev said:

Does anyone add any clear to the veneers to make them really shine, or leave as they come

I used an oil finish on mine. No clear, I hit them with some feed and wax once or twice a year. Still need to get them striped. 

9B9D0189-9044-41D5-B627-B63134638C05.jpeg

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/27/2021 at 10:29 PM, kreed said:

My guy striped

Ken, would you kindly measure the distance of the stripe on your panel from each of inside edges of the installed panel. Additionally, the width of the stripe would be most helpful.

I cannot seem to stop attempting new and better ways to do things.

Regards,

Turbinator

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Hi Bob - at the upholstery shop now but will do that when they return. Gave my Pinstriping guy an old panel to copy . Think the stripe may be a tiny bit wider than original but will check for sure .

KReed

ROA 14549

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Easiest way to lay down a single stripe is to use a stencil.  This video shows a two stripe stencil but single stripe stencils are available.  Lay all four stencils down at the same time, then use a razor blade to cut the ends so the stencil is one large rectangle.  The tape is  pliable enough that you can put bends in it to match the arc of the surrounding moldings.  Or lay down a single black tape then clear over everything.  (Only the '65s had the pinstripe on the door panels.)

 

https://finessepinstriping.com/

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OK Ed: EZ-PZ. I've striped hundreds of cars with tape. That's the easy part. Laying down the paint?   Not so easy.   On the 65 Riv panels if I clear over the tape it seems to hold the tape pretty good.  How do you get to Carnegie Hall?  Mitch

Edited by lrlforfun (see edit history)
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11 hours ago, lrlforfun said:

On the 65 Riv panels if I clear over the tape it seems to hold the tape pretty good.

Irlforfun, how do insure your lines are parallel to one another. How about line width? Yes, we can eye ball it. The pros do it all the time with those brushes. Beats me. Devil is in the details.

Turbinator

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Say that you want to lay your pinstripe 1” from the trim.  Take a length of 1” wide masking tape and lay it next to the trim, flush up against the trim then lay the pinstripe flush against the masking tape. 

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18 hours ago, RivNut said:

Say that you want to lay your pinstripe 1” from the trim.  Take a length of 1” wide masking tape and lay it next to the trim, flush up against the trim then lay the pinstripe flush against the masking tape. 

Ed, I’ll buy the the 1” masking tape wide against the trim. Good thought.

How wide is the stripe? How do you insure the the stripe is straight on the bare side?

Is the stripe specification 1” from the inside trim? I don’t know the width of the stripe that is why I ask. Some of this stuff requires beating it to death for the details or it is not quite right.

Thank you

Turbinator

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" Say that you want to....." I was using the 1" as an example. I was not inferring that the stripe was 1" from the trim. As a matter of fact, you cannot buy 1" masking tape; it now come in mm.  This is the method that I use when laying a pinstripe on the compound curves of a bicycle fender.  When I was applying pin stripes many years ago for the Dr Vinyl franchise that I owned, I would have a small mark at the beginning of where I wanted the stripe to begin, then pull the tape taut and let the stripe itself make the straight line. Slowly lowering the other end to the place I wanted it.  Pulling a string makes a perfectly straight line, same as with a piece of vinyl tape. Same reason carpenters use a chalk line.  My advise was only to be considered as an instructional tool for someone not comfortable with doing it by "eye."

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IMG_20200924_111634370_HDR.jpg.d8d889116470639fa77c4540210c9c8c.jpgI pinstriped these bicycle wheels free handed with the tool that I pictured earlier.  The pinstriping on the fenders is a different process. I painted the entire fender white, laid down a pinstripe "mask" then painted the fender blue. Pulled the mask revealing the white and shot a couple of coats of clear over everything.

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)
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If you're interested, here's what the bike looked like when I brought it home. No outside help was used during the restoration.  If it can't be done in my garage, it doesn't get done.  (I did have to buy tires and handle bar grips.) That's one of the heads off my 64 in the background.

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On 8/21/2021 at 11:02 AM, RivNut said:

Bob, I'm curious as to why are you even asking? Your 63 did not come from the factory with stripes on the panels? 

Ed, 100% correct. My 63 does not have the pin stripe nor will it get them. I stumbled on a number of panels that have 65 Badging that lack striping. I have a hunch some folks might want to buy panels with the 65 badging striped to the correct dimensions. I’d squeeze the panel striping in amongst Turbine, powder coating, and dash pad work. A challenge and an item that could keep me busy. Thank you for your input. I appreciate the help.

I figured Gene or Tom would have those hangers you are looking for.

 Turbinator 

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Some may wish to hear how I redid the door panels on my '65, many, many moons ago.

 

Around 1984 I redid the wood veneer on my '65 Deluxe interior.  Back then there were pre-cut NO veneer kits available. 

 

First I tried real walnut veneer, but that became a hopeless and frustrating job to cut the veneer accurately, esp. around the console pieces.  Another issue was I could not get foil-backed veneer, like GM originally used.  This is important because if you just glue the raw wood onto metal it will warp much sooner unless there is an intermediate foil layer behind the veneer.

 

So, I used what I though would be the next best alternative - Formica laminate!  Okay, purists are cringing, but the results were outstanding IMO.

 

I found the closest match to the original veneer was a Formica pattern named "Teak".  Because this was a custom order, I had to buy an entire 4 x 8 foot sheet of the laminate.  This was way more than I needed, but the extra laminate gave me lots of spare material to play with in case I screwed up some of the panels.  It wasn't expensive.

 

Cutting and trimming the panels was easy, and this helped especially on the console pieces because I wanted the woodgrain to flow through all 4 pieces that cover the center console. 

 

I did the door veneer pinstriping with 1/16" black "fuel proof" pinstriping tape, available at any hobby store.  I still have the roll:

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The pinstriping has held up extremely well, and I've never had to re-do it!  The last step was to affix the -R- chrome emblems to the front panels. I then installed the new panels into the stainless steel frames for the 4 door panels, and used contact cement to glue the console pieces down onto the console, after ensuring all traces of old glue had been removed with acetone. 

 

Well, 37 years later, this is what it looks like:

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Although not 'correct', using a high-quality laminate has the advantage of extreme durability and imperviousness to stains and water.  This car was my daily driver until the early 90's, so it wasn't like it lived in a garage all the time, protected from sun.  Nobody has noticed that the veneer isn't real wood and it still looks as good today as when I put the panels in.  

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 8/20/2021 at 10:09 AM, Turbinator said:

Ken, thank you. Shouldn’t be hard and micrometer measured is not needed. To the 1/16th for me is fine.

Turbinator

Pinstripe on an original panel is 2.02 mm. The ones I had done are 2.85 mm . Gonna have to live with it ! 😎( do judges carry micrometers ? 🧐🤬

KReed

 

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On 9/2/2021 at 8:20 PM, kreed said:

Pinstripe on an original panel is 2.02 mm. The ones I had done are 2.85 mm . Gonna have to live with it ! 😎( do judges carry micrometers ? 🧐🤬

KReed

 

KReef, thank you. I’ll go with the 2.02mm. One measurement I really need is the distance from edge of the panel already in place to the pinstripe. Another way to say it is how far from the inside of the panel do I paint the pinstripe? I really appreciate your helpfulness.

Regards,

Turbinator

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On 9/7/2021 at 5:08 PM, kreed said:

I can measure from the chrome trim piece inner edge to the pinstripe if you want since mine are already trimmed out .

KReed

ROA 14549

KReed, Thank you. Your measurement of the trimmed panel of the stripe to the chrome trim would be perfect!

I appreciate your help.

Thank you

Turbinator

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