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48 Chrysler, Can't bleed L. F. wheel cylinders.


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I have installed a complete brake system on my 48. Steel lines, hoses, MC, Wheel cylinders and I  blead R.R, L,R and the R, F, no problem!

 But I can't get any fluid to pass into the L. F. cylinders.

 The steel line is clear, the new hose is clear, the Cylinders do not have anything in them(I took them apart to ck).

 The metal piece in the clyinder that holds the rubber seems to bottom out over the inlet  holes. I only get a few drops out of the upper bleeder.

 I have tried two different new cylinders and no luck.

 The shoes are centered and adjusted, but still no fluid.

 Does anyone have any suggestion as to what could be wrong?

 Thank you, Roger

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Sounds like the brake piston is possibly blocking the hole where the brake fluid line enters the wheel cylinder.  If you take the top brake spring off and push the brake pedal does the fluid come out the bleeder? 

Edited by TerryB (see edit history)
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At this point I would remove, disassemble and compare the LF and the working RF cylinders. It sounds like the piston is blocking the fluid input port. This could be as simple as a misplaced spacer washer or as bad as an improper sleeve. You did not say if the cylinders were sleeved, but if they were there are more things possible. Check EVERYTHING against a known working example. Let us know what you find!

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49 minutes ago, TerryB said:

Sounds like the brake piston is possibly blocking the hole where the brake fluid line enters the wheel cylinder.  If you take the top brake spring off and push the brake pedal does the fluid come out the bleeder? 

 I will try that.

 Roger

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There had been some issues reported with brake cylinders where the rod that pushes against the brake shoe was too long and pushed the brake piston too deep into the cylinder.  As 37 Roadie said, compare to a working  cylinder.

Good luck!

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19 minutes ago, TerryB said:

There had been some issues reported with brake cylinders where the rod that pushes against the brake shoe was too long and pushed the brake piston too deep into the cylinder.  As 37 Roadie said, compare to a working  cylinder.

Good luck!

 I think that that is my exact problem. I will ck the length of my old push rods.

 Thanks, Roger

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There are at least two different lengths of push rod for that era Plymouths so I would think Chryslers would be the same.  Make sure the lengths of the new ones are the same as the original ones.  Front cylinders can be difficult at the best of times.  I am not sure as I haven’t done mine for several years but I think the lower cylinder needs to be bled first, then the upper

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I  would leave the parts out of the wheel cylinder to see if fluid comes in from the brake line inlet port.   If it does the problem is in the wheel cylinder parts or as mentioned wrong length brake shoe rod driving the piston back over the port.  This is not Rocket Science.

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Is the hole for the bleeder open to the bore? Same for the inlet hole. Does the bleeder screw hole go all the way through? i.e. do the two holes drilled in the bleeder screw meet?

 

If yes, then as above, check for interference of the internal seals to the ports.

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Posted (edited)

 I shortened the push rod 1/8" and they bleed nicely now.

 

 Thanks for all the help.

 

 I made this simple jig to center the shoes.

 It is just a long 1/2" bolt welded to a wheel bearing nut with a piece of 1/4" flat stock bent on a 90 degree angle.

IMG_1430.JPG

 

IMG_1429.JPG.6ee2094260a77d2c88f2a65104250991.JPG

Edited by Roger Walling (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, Roger Walling said:

I made this simple jig to center the shoes.

Did you use a large caliper to determine the inside diameter of the drum before setting your gauge? This question is for future reference. Thanks.

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12 minutes ago, Fossil said:

Did you use a large caliper to determine the inside diameter of the drum before setting your gauge? This question is for future reference. Thanks.

 No, I set it to fit the shoes slightly larger, and then adjusted them  and then used a special brake id. and od. gauge on the drum and made sure that the shoe diameter was a little bit smaller than the inside of the drum. (factory specks are 5 to 6 thousands_

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