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Supercharged 1963 Studebaker Lark Daytona R2 Hardtop, Four-Speed


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Right on the heals of Red R2 Hawk Stick car with have the same thing in Lark version.   I liked the Hawk and I understand why this is neat, but it still looks dorky to me.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/154527005117

 

At Art & Speed, we like finding those rare gems, and this fully restored 1963 Studebaker Lark Daytona R2 Hardtop is one of only 110 built with the supercharged Jet-Thrust 289ci V8 with a four-speed manual gearbox. This garage-kept Stude has been well-cared for with a lot of documentation to back it up from the Studebaker specialist in Mississippi who owned it. Factory options included front disc brakes, bucket seats, and a twin-traction differential.

From headlight to taillight, everything is rebuilt or replaced with new or NOS parts relatively recently. Those updates start with a repaint using the factory basecoat color, Regal Red, with a clearcoat on top. The body is obviously in great shape, as are the NOS bumpers, as well.

As mentioned above, the engine is the original 289ci V8 but rebuilt to OEM specs with all the right parts. The Paxton SN60 supercharger is also restored, and the engine bay freshened up along with it. The owner even added finned Studebaker valve covers that really set it apart. All bushings have been replaced, including the A-frame, engine, and transmission mounts. At the same time, all the peripherals were rebuilt or replaced, including the fuel pump, starter, radiator, hoses, brake master cylinder, brakes, brake lines, oil lines, and even the exhaust. This car wants for nothing!

Inside, the car is new as well. The red and white bucket seats and dash cover are showing to be in excellent condition, appearing as new. The bright red carpet is showing no signs of wear along with the headliner and door panels. Other features and modifications include a period-correct tachometer and a Hurst four-speed shifter for the Borg-Warner T-10 manual transmission. Lastly, the consigner added 15x7-inch Rev Wheels and radial tires to give it a little more aggressive look, though he includes the factory wheel covers.

This Lark Daytona R2 has been with the seller for over 15 years and drives like-new, if not better. It is now being offered in its turn-key-ready condition for you to enjoy. Fully restored with great attention to detail, you will find this Studebaker a pleasure to drive. Give Art & Speed a call today at 901-850-0507 to check out this rare gem of Americana!

MECHANICAL

Matching Numbers 289ci Avanti SuperchargedEngine (Rebuilt) (#JTS 1490)

OEM Paxton SN60 Supercharger (Rebuilt)

Borg-Warner T-10 Four-Speed Transmission

Hurst Shifter

Dual Performance Exhaust

Finned Valve Covers

Factory Exhaust Manifolds

3:31:1 Twin Traction Differential

New Engine and Trans Mounts and A-Frame Bushings

New Fuel Pump

Rebuilt Starter

New Radiator and Hoses

CHASSIS

Dual Master Cylinders

Power Disc Brakes Front

Power Drum Brakes Rear

Power Steering

New Rear Spring Bushings

New Gabriel Gas Shocks

Radial Tires (205/70R15)

Rev 15x7-Inch Wheels

Immaculate Undercarriage - Clean, Neat, and Rust Free

EXTERIOR

Newer Factory Red Finish with Clearcoat (P6311)

Flawless Front and Rear Bumpers (NOS-front)

Excellent Glass, Antenna, Mirrors, and All Exterior Trim

INTERIOR

New Red and white Factory Bucket Seats

New Carpet and Dash Cover

Factory Steering Wheel

New Hurst Shift Handle

Interior Trim in Great Shape

1963-studebaker-daytona-r2-3.jpg

1963-studebaker-daytona-r2-2.jpg

1963-studebaker-daytona-r2-1.jpg

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Getting back to stock wheels/hubcaps will help.

This looks too much like that nice Edsel with the crazy wheels we discussed recently.

Cool car, and the boy racer mods, aside from the wheels, are subdued.

 

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I agree with suchan that the mag wheels do absolutely nothing for that car. Nevertheless, I'd love to have it. A factory supercharged 289 Lark would truly be something special. I don't know if the finned Stude valve covers are factory either, but unlike the wheels, I really like them. It'll be interesting to see how high this cool car is bid.

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1 hour ago, JamesR said:

I agree with suchan that the mag wheels do absolutely nothing for that car. Nevertheless, I'd love to have it. A factory supercharged 289 Lark would truly be something special. I don't know if the finned Stude valve covers are factory either, but unlike the wheels, I really like them. It'll be interesting to see how high this cool car is bid.

 

I liked the Hawk better,  but I see the coolness in this.   Sort of a like a Randle Gremlin.   My only issue is that you need to explain to most people why it is cool, as opposed to them saying "Wow that is cool what is it?".

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I've never seen one but it should have been very fast.

My dad bought a 1964 rambler new .It was a 2 door hard top.

It had a 289 v8 three sp with overdrive They called it twin stick.

bucket seats. I was 18 at the time.

And yes it was fast.

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4 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

My only issue is that you need to explain to most people why it is cool, as opposed to them saying "Wow that is cool what is it?".

 

Very true, and good point. Nevertheless, I tend to like nerdy cars that are performance equipped from the factory in a subdued or understated way rather than an over the top conspicuous way. The AMC SC/Rambler of the late 1960's sort of typifies what I dislike in this respect - a big cobbled looking scoop and and awkward yet flamboyant paint scheme.

 

Another nerdy looking performance oriented car that I like is the early Corvair Monza Spyder. I've owned none of these cars...just speaking about what appeals to me in a visual sense.

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IMO that is a lot of money for a Lark, but due to the cars originality and speed factor this car will sell. I agree that if you have to explain why this car is cool, maybe it is not. 

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I guess I have to tell this story, might never get another chance.

My high school friends father had a mid life crisis and bought an R2 lark 4 speed.

I had a 57 Ford with a 1960 Ford " police interceptor" 360 HP installed, with 8L three speed.

We decided to go to Thompson Motor speedway drag strip to see how they would perform.

On the way out , on interstate 90 he pulled up next to me and the race was on.

I had an auto matic rear end in it at the time , about 3 to 1 ratio.

Neck and neck for miles, nether letting up. I had the speedo buried , but it was no were near accurate.

The exit came up and we got off the freeway. Only to continue the competition at the strip.

We were both in A modified class, and he would run away from me at the start line , and I would catch him at the finish line.

What a great day we had , I matched an R2 Stude , he matched a 360 HP Ford.

A couple years later I bought a 63 Lark land cruiser , top of the line, 289 , overdrive. $1300

Very fast , outran 389 Pontiac lead sleds.

Lots of Studebaker memories.

Someday I might tell about my 55 President coupe with Hemi in it.

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Wow, seems like strong money for that car. It is rare but that doesnt always translate to value.  Its a nice, unique car but in the 30k -35k price point  I could think of half a dozen cars I would buy first. He may look back and wish he had taken that offer.

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Kerry, it is the “top of the mountain” syndrome. If you are in to those 60s Studebakers this car represents the peak of where you can land. There is some guy out there willing to pay more for the bragging rights to the top of the mountain.

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It’s a neat car, and at a Studebaker meet, where everyone knows what it is, you’d definitely be pretty far up that mountain.

 

In other venues, one would need to explain why it’s so rare and cool.  Most cars that need such an explanation are not as interesting to the general collector, or at least that’s my observation.

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