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1925 Cadillac universal joint needed


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Make one.......it’s a torque tube correct? Probably can rebuild one if you have a reasonably talented machinest. 

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It would help a lot to see what it looks like - and have measurements. You will not be able to walk into NAPA and buy one. It's possible someone will have one extra but it will almost certainly be used and likely not be much better than the one you have. With the dimensions we may be able to identify a new replacement part that will work.. Universal joints are one of those parts with thousands of industrial applications having nothing to do with cars. One of the major stumbling blocks for many collectors is that they presume car parts have to have been made for the car. They don't. They just have to work properly.

 

Ed got his answer in before I did but, as usual, he knows his stuff. Rebuilding is a possibility also but you have to know where you are starting...

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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I just saw Ed's earlier comment regarding the universal joint. I started out in antique cars with a 27 314 Cadillac and I have to agree - the chassis was built like a truck. In fact, it makes most modern trucks look flimsy. So...have you actually seen this broken part? Or is someone telling you it is broken? Most modern mechanics have never even seen a torque tube drive much less understand them so unless you are doing this yourself and know these early cars or using someone who has some experience with big, classic era cars, I'm very skeptical of that diagnosis.

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

I just saw Ed's earlier comment regarding the universal joint. I started out in antique cars with a 27 314 Cadillac and I have to agree - the chassis was built like a truck. In fact, it makes most modern trucks look flimsy. So...have you actually seen this broken part? Or is someone telling you it is broken? Most modern mechanics have never even seen a torque tube drive much less understand them so unless you are doing this yourself and know these early cars or using someone who has some experience with big, classic era cars, I'm very skeptical of that diagnosis.

It was diagnosed by my local friend who has rebuilt and restored many Packards from the 20s and 30s.  But he could be wrong.  I need to get it on a lift and work on it.  Unfortunately that's my next purchase is a garage with a lift.  What can I say I like driving them more then working on them, but I am learning the fun in that also.  SO could it be in the rear wheel housing or rear axel gears that I hurt?  I was reaving the engine to get her to go and I heard a metal snap. then we just pushed her into the garage.

Edited by Kurt Zimmerle
wanted to add info (see edit history)
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Sounds like a broken axle to me.  It happened to me on a 1930 Pierce just gently pulling away from a stop sign, no revving involved.  When we pulled the axle, there were old oil stains on 80% of the cross section, indicating that it had been ready to break for decades.  The last 20% indicated a "twist off."

 

There are axle manufacturers which will make you a new one from your old parts but with modern metallurgy and heat/cold treatments.  I can recommend a place in Sacramento CA but there's a Pierce owner in the Carolinas who had some done more recently on the East Coast.  Suggest you spring for new manufacture --a PAIR--do both at the same time--rather than relying on a used one with old metallurgy and almost 100 years of decay.

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1 hour ago, Grimy said:

Sounds like a broken axle to me.  It happened to me on a 1930 Pierce just gently pulling away from a stop sign, no revving involved.  When we pulled the axle, there were old oil stains on 80% of the cross section, indicating that it had been ready to break for decades.  The last 20% indicated a "twist off."

 

There are axle manufacturers which will make you a new one from your old parts but with modern metallurgy and heat/cold treatments.  I can recommend a place in Sacramento CA but there's a Pierce owner in the Carolinas who had some done more recently on the East Coast.  Suggest you spring for new manufacture --a PAIR--do both at the same time--rather than relying on a used one with old metallurgy and almost 100 years of decay.

 

George, in a different post I agree with the comment.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yes it was the back axel that broke.  any help on finding more specific who makes new ones on the east coast or closer top Michigan?  Do they have right and left or are they interchangeable ?   Its driving season I want to drive my new baby so bad.  I think I found one on eBay. 

 

Is there anyone or company that caters for Cadillacs from the 1920S?  

 

Thank you all for being so helpful as I venture Into this world of older antique Cadillacs. 

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On 7/13/2021 at 2:37 PM, Grimy said:

Sounds like a broken axle to me.  It happened to me on a 1930 Pierce just gently pulling away from a stop sign, no revving involved.  When we pulled the axle, there were old oil stains on 80% of the cross section, indicating that it had been ready to break for decades.  The last 20% indicated a "twist off."

 

There are axle manufacturers which will make you a new one from your old parts but with modern metallurgy and heat/cold treatments.  I can recommend a place in Sacramento CA but there's a Pierce owner in the Carolinas who had some done more recently on the East Coast.  Suggest you spring for new manufacture --a PAIR--do both at the same time--rather than relying on a used one with old metallurgy and almost 100 years of decay.

What is the name of the place in Sacramento CA?  Is it an expensive process ? can I get both axels made for under a grand ?  Just trying to think of the budget. 

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Kurt, a friend of mine in the Pierce-Arrow Society (PAS) broke an axle in his 1930 Pierce.  The 1929-30 8-spline axles are prone to breakage.  He had a run of EIGHT axles made by the following company, keeping two for himself (good idea to replace the "good" one as well) and sold off the remainder at $500 each.  I think you'd need to do a run of about that number to reduce the individual cost to $500.  Now this was 5 years ago, so prices probably have gone up.  Edinmass may be able to get you specifics on L to R differences (if any) and what other Cad/LaS models may use the same axle.  I'd send them the good axle on the other side.  Following is what my friend told us buyers:

 

LANGILL'S GENERAL MACHINE, INC., Sacramento, CA. They are a major machine shop with modern and traditional equipment. They do large scale production runs and boutique custom work. They have been building axles for our members of the Horseless Carriage Club of Nevada over several years with satisfactory results.  You can check them out at:  http://langills.com

The material is 4340 quenched & tempered stress relieved. They are heat treated to 28-32 Rc hardness resulting in parts that have a tensile strength of 150,000 PSI and a yield of 140,000 PSI

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