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1926 Buick help


Servin
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Hey guys so I’m trying to figure what’s what under the hood and I noticed a couple thing maybe you guys can clarify some stuff so I there’s this metal rod type thing wanted to make sure if I connected where it should be and why my honey comb radiator has an extra open port of some sort I seen in other photos online that it connects to on top of the motor maybe for water circulation but my motor doesn’t have that type of opening took some photos hope you can help thanks! First photo is the rod seem like a hook and behind the distributor looked like that’s where it went correct me if I’m wrong 

2nd photo is the motor 

3rd is the radiator port that goes somewhere or gets blocked off? I have the thermostat housing on top of the radiator so that’s what’s confusing me 

4th is where I connected the rod

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The linkage rod to the distributor base is correct. Now you need to look through any boxes of loose parts and find the special bolt with spring and sleeve that acts as friction device to hold the distributer in place after it has been advanced / retarded for starting & driving.  This is fastened into the generator through the slot in the distributer base  If you can't locate the original, something could be cobbled up to substitute. 

The radiator thermostat has been removed so look for the cover plate with 4 bolt holes.  If the cover has disappeared, you could fabricate a flat plate with 4 holes to plug up the hole with gasket or sealant.  I don't know if that old style thermostat can be replaced with a modern type. 

Kevin 

friction screw.jpg

thermostat cover.jpg

Edited by Oregon Desert model 45
edit (see edit history)
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Servin:

For some reason my added comments in the previous post keep getting erased. I will try another post.

 

 The carb linkage with the spring goes to the accelerator pedal. Location of spring looks correct.

The spark and throttle mechanism at the bottom of the steering box need to be lubed and carefully worked until free.  Especialy the gears  are fragile. These are controlled by the levers at the top center at the hub of the steering wheel. Also the cross shaft to the other side of the engine that controls the distributer. I would disconnect the rod to the distributer first. If the distributer is die-cast it will be swollen and seized in the housing.

 I see the linkage rod to the ehaust damper is disconnected (pin broken off) from the heat riser mechanisim on the back side of the unit and lying on top of the by-pass tube.(the dash controll has a plate over it in one of your earlier photos). The damper valve is also probably seized. Pennetrating oil and time to get it free or in extreem cases a torch.The damper shaft has a slot on the end that if the the valve is open should be verticle. 

 Yours shows at 2 and 8 o'clock which tells me it is closed.

Edited by dibarlaw (see edit history)
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I want to give you a heads up on something you will eventually run into while working on this car.  Components supplied by Delco often used fasteners with nonstandard thread pitches which can be difficult to find now.  That special bolt has 10-30 threads on my 1925 Buick.  Starters, generators,  combination light/ignition switches all had nonstandard fasteners.   I don't recall running into that problem anywhere else on the car.  I usually clean up fasteners and tapped holes with tap & die and learned to check thread pitch before chasing old threads.   Nonstandard taps & dies can be ordered online for this purpose and I had to buy several while working on Delco parts.

Kevin 

friction screw.jpg

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7 hours ago, Oregon Desert model 45 said:

I want to give you a heads up on something you will eventually run into while working on this car.  Components supplied by Delco often used fasteners with nonstandard thread pitches which can be difficult to find now.  That special bolt has 10-30 threads on my 1925 Buick.  Starters, generators,  combination light/ignition switches all had nonstandard fasteners.   I don't recall running into that problem anywhere else on the car.  I usually clean up fasteners and tapped holes with tap & die and learned to check thread pitch before chasing old threads.   Nonstandard taps & dies can be ordered online for this purpose and I had to buy several while working on Delco parts.

Kevin 

friction screw.jpg

Thanks for the heads up man appreciate it

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