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Filister Head Bolts


dneivandt
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Boy,if you know your old cars and parts,when the proper original style nuts and bolts R subsituted( notice how I subsituted R for are) or mis- matches, sets of fasteners ,it stands right out, especially on a so called "restored"car with a price$$$$$!

 

I love the gents into details and  take the time to search out the proper fasteners.They are serious!

 

 

Edited by Flivverking (see edit history)
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10 minutes ago, Flivverking said:

Boy,if you know your old cars and parts,when the proper original style nuts and bolts R subsituted( notice how I subsituted R for are) or mis- matches, sets of fasteners ,it stands right out, especially on a so called "restored"car with a parice$$$$$!

 

I love the gents into details and  take the time to search out the proper fasteners.They are serious!

 

 

Thats the only right way to do it though, right?

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I needed a couple several years ago. Chucked a standard 3/8 24 hex head bolt into a common hand-held electric drill. Spun the bolt head while carefully held next to the bench grinder. Extremely light pressure is required as the spinning hex will bounce if any significant pressure is used (helps also to use a steady rest), and grind off peak giving something smaller but still not quite round. Once the head was sufficiently rounded (sides and top), I cut the screwdriver slot in with a hacksaw.

If you can get a high enough head bolt to begin with? The result can be near perfection.

 

I use the same method to re-round new carriage bolts to something much closer to the original style.

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David, You are welcome. The most difficult part of that task, is actually cutting the screwdriver slot and getting it to look right. A simple cut with a hacksaw is too thin. So as I cut, I angle the hacksaw alternating to the right and left to widen the slot near the top. I then use a small but sharp file to pretty it up a bit.

A good source of used 3/8 24 hex bolts is almost anyone with model Ts. Ford used about a hundred of them on each car, so millions of them survive in junk drawers today. And they have nice tall hex heads to cut down!

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19 minutes ago, Flivverking said:

Can a Dremel tool with thin cut off wheel be used to help make the above slots...

With a steady hand and saftey glasses that is!

 

I would say it could be used. However, the thin cutoff discs are too thin. Perhaps the thin (not as thin!) grinding stone might work? It might be a bit too thick, but could maybe work well to finish the slot and make it look nice.

Definitely, use some sort of safety glasses with those Dremmel cutoff discs! I have exploded a couple dozen of them myself! A wonderful tool for many fine and/or small tasks.

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For fun, this what I had on hand .

 

Red grinding stone wheel and what's left of a black re-inforced cut off disk .Both I used to trim cut in place some one inch by 1/8" flat metal flat stock.

The black 50% used up  .040 thin disk stays inline much truer..the red stone can wander easier.

0708211734.jpg

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Fillister head screws/bolts also have a convex or "domed" head. Making a fillister head out of a standard head with simple tools and having it look correct is a challenge. A lathe and milling machine makes it easy.

Assuming you need only a "few" if you send me the bolts you want modified I'll be happy to help for the cost of the postage, or I can just pick them up at my local tractor dealer............Bob

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)
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This is the best you will get by modifying a standard 3/8-24 bolt. It sort of looks like a fillister head but it ain't. Standard fillister head measures .622 dia X .355 high. One shown is .534 dia X .204 high. Close enough for you?...........Bob

20210709_112730.jpg

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Another way to skin this cat.

 

Turn the head of a 3/8-24 bolt to 7/16". Counter bore a 1/2" length of 5/8" rod to accept the turned down bolt head. Silver braze the bolt head into the rod. Turn and face the rod to .622 X .355. Slot the head. This will yield a fillister head fastener of correct size and appearance. This would be a fun project for someone with a small lathe and is a good example why most serious restorers should own one.

BTW, the head could also be slotted on your lathe. Simply grind a bit to slot width and use the cross slide as a shaper to slice the slot to depth .001/.002 or so at a time. Slow but effective......................Bob

 

20210709_174803.jpg

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Bhigdog said:

Another way to skin this cat.

 

Turn the head of a 3/8-24 bolt to 7/16". Counter bore a 1/2" length of 5/8" rod to accept the turned down bolt head. Silver braze the bolt head into the rod. Turn and face the rod to .622 X .355. Slot the head. This will yield a fillister head fastener of correct size and appearance. This would be a fun project for someone with a small lathe and is a good example why most serious restorers should own one.

BTW, the head could also be slotted on your lathe. Simply grind a bit to slot width and use the cross slide as a shaper to slice the slot to depth .001/.002 or so at a time. Slow but effective......................Bob

 

Or just make them from scratch. You can put the genuine burrs on with the screwdriver, when you tighten them up.  🙂

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24 minutes ago, Bush Mechanic said:

Or just make them from scratch. You can put the genuine burrs on with the screwdriver, when you tighten them up.  🙂

 

Yup, that's another way but I was trying to avoid the obvious and be a bit inventive, just for fun.........bob

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)
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