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Electric car jacks


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I know, they aren't original equipment, but my aching joints look for relief whenever possible.

 

Today was the first time I came across electric car jacks. This is the motorized scissor type. One listing claims that their jack can lift 11045 lbs.; did someone forget to put in a decimal?

 

Apart from an old Jeep Wrangler and a Prius, the primary use for me would be to lift my '37 Buick Special 4-dr.  I can't seem to find the weight in the shop manual but the light-weight lift where the Buick is normally serviced strains terribly to raise it. 

 

What's the general feeling on these toys? Am I nuts expecting one to lift a '37 Buick? Incidentally my Buick has been converted to12v.

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I don't know anything about them, but for $12 you can get a hex drive adapter for a conventional scissor jack that lets you drive it with a battery powered impact wrench. That's probably a better choice, since even if you don't have one now, that impact will probably be very useful.

 

71oBsJP4aAL._AC_SL1200_.jpg

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6 minutes ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

Do you remember the air powered bumper jacks that a lot of commercial garages used to have?  No good on most if not all modern cars but I would love one for the old cars.

 

I suspect the OP is looking for something he can take with him while driving the car.

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Nope, no hijack, Joe.  I appreciate your input.  My current scissor jack has a very long crank handle with a 1/2 x 1/2 male connector.  Somehow I just haven't given any thought to powering it with a common impact driver.  Can a battery or two put out enough power to lift a Buick?  Its worth a try. Tnx.

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Any decent 1/2 inch battery powered impact wrench should be able to lift a fairly heavy car more than once on a charge.

 

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I have a 1/2 milwaukee battery impact gun that will lift 2 buicks! Although its not cheap at about $500 may not be for the handy man. Be good to have in the car though as it will make changing the tire much easier once its jacked up.

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This is actually a great thread.   What to carry for a jack is a big deal and the OEM ones will either get you killed or are to dressed up for show or both.

 

I don't have a suggestion but the scissor jack with impact gun is not a bad idea.    I plan on carrying my 18V tools bag on any extended driving trips.   Which also has a tire pump along with the impact gun and other 18V tools.

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I’ve got a low profile light weight aluminum floor jack in the 38 Studebaker. Easy to assemble and gives great support. I’ve only used it one time when I got a flat. Actually the two cops that saw me on the side of the road and stopped to help a grey hair old guy with an interesting car actually did the work. They did say it was a good jack for the car. 
 

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15 minutes ago, alsancle said:

I don't have a suggestion but the scissor jack with impact gun is not a bad idea.    I plan on carrying my 18V tools bag on any extended driving trips.   Which also has a tire pump along with the impact gun and other 18V tools.

And here I was under the impression you don't venture much further than 30 miles from home with vintage cars.  😉

 

On the more serious note, while those 18V impacts, etc may sound good on paper, how many times will they end up having a dead battery ...

 

As someone who actually drives his vintage cars extensively (and being a bit old-school car guy) I tend to carry mainly mechanical service equipment and tools in case of roadside emergencies, including mechanical 5-Ton bottle jack, etc...

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As someone who just had a flat tire on one of his old cars over the weekend and did not have a jack with him, this thread is relevant to my interests.

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35 minutes ago, TTR said:

On the more serious note, while those 18V impacts, etc may sound good on paper, how many times will they end up having a dead battery ...

 

I always keep mine charged, but for the forgetful among us, there's always this as a last resort.

 

image_15191.jpg

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1 minute ago, joe_padavano said:

 

I always keep mine charged, but for the forgetful among us, there's always this as a last resort.

 

image_15191.jpg

Available in 6V ? And made in C***a too, what could possibly go wrong ? Does it come with LED touch screen app ?

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42 minutes ago, TTR said:

And here I was under the impression you don't venture much further than 30 miles from home with vintage cars.  😉

 

 

True.   In case there was an extended trip.   Right now I'm usually within range of a friendly rollback.

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1 hour ago, TTR said:

On the more serious note, while those 18V impacts, etc may sound good on paper, how many times will they end up having a dead battery ...

 

I have a 1/2 inch 20v Li Porter Cable impact that can sit for well over a month and still have a very strong, if not completely full battery.

Best part is I also have a Porter Cable screwdriver and impact driver that use the same batteries so I always have at least 3 fully charged batteries on hand.

 

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7 minutes ago, zepher said:

 

I have a 1/2 inch 20v Li Porter Cable impact that can sit for well over a month and still have a very strong, if not completely full battery.

Best part is I also have a Porter Cable screwdriver and impact driver that use the same batteries so I always have at least 3 fully charged batteries on hand.

 

 

^^^THIS. I've got Dewalt, but same thing.

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In 2018 a 2018 Toyota Camry got a flat in a parking lot at the grocery store near me. I actually read the instructions  for the jack, and correctly positioned it, and lifted up the car. It collapsed on its own on level paved ground. We actually have a video of it happening. We sent it to Toyota and never heard back. Moral of the story, never use any jack that doesn’t have a snap on my label. 

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4 hours ago, SC38DLS said:

I’ve got a low profile light weight aluminum floor jack in the 38 Studebaker. Easy to assemble and gives great support.

I have AAA. Don't need no stinken jack. 

Actually carry a jack but as long as I have a cell phone the car will get hauled. Have no plans to ever be more than 40 miles from home. 

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28 minutes ago, Fossil said:

I have AAA. Don't need no stinken jack. 

Actually carry a jack but as long as I have a cell phone the car will get hauled. Have no plans to ever be more than 40 miles from home. 

AAA Gold will get you 100 miles and, I think, there is now another membership level that will get you 200 miles of free towing.

 

There is a bottle jack buried behind the rear seat along with the other tools needed to change a tire but my “tool kit” for anything other than a very long distance tour is simply the following:

  • Cellphone
  • Credit card
  • AAA card

Conveniently, they are almost always with me so I don’t need to worry about packing them into the car when I leave. So much easier to fix something at home with full access to all my tools.

 

Even better and easier is to verify everything is in good order before leaving. Not always possible to do that well. A couple of years back I had a modern tube fail on the road. I don’t dismount the tires and check the tubes before leaving home so that missed the “pre-flight check”. Fortunately we were within the 100 mile free AAA towing range we have for our account and we were on our way home so we just finished that trip in the cab of a flatbed instead of in the car.

 

Pro-tip: When in rural areas use your compass app or other equivalent to get your latitude/longitude to give to the AAA operator. Street numbers and cross streets might work in more populated areas but those don’t always get you close in the middle of nowhere. And cellphone tower based locations can be pretty bad in the middle of nowhere too. A good GPS lat/lon fix given to the AAA operator will allow the tow truck driver to find you with minimal hassle. Much better than something like “I am somewhere between Smallville and Anytown on highway 37”. Talking with the tow driver, apparently the location simply pops up on the app on their phone when they get the “call” from AAA so they don’t have to translate anything they can just click a couple of buttons to navigate to your location.

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I use a lot of Milwaukee battery stuff on a daily basis. I have several chargers running with batteries so there its not often I dont have power. The battery for my impact gun will stay charged quite a while if not used. I have had batteries sit a month or more and still have a good charge. If youre planning on a trip just make sure you have a couple of batteries charged before hand and you should be good to go. You can also get an inverter and hook the charger up in the car I suppose too.

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My low profile aluminum floor jack is a harbor freight special. If I remember correctly (the grey hair is pulling all the memory cells out of my head- that’s my story and I’m sticking to it) it cost $59 on sale with a coupon. I do carry a jack stand ( not Harbor freight brand) also for safety purposes. 

dave s 

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Even though I have AAA, there are many times I just need to jack up the car for servicing, ie: brakes, shocks, etc.  For this type to lifting, I doubt AAA would be happy for an agent to do my lifting.

 

I noticed that many of the electric jack "kits" include an impact wrench that can run off of the 12v cigarette lighter socket. That's Ok for me, but I'm not so sure that the 6v drivers will be happy.

 

For the amount of times I'll use one of these kits, I'm leaning toward sticking with my large scissor jack and powering it with an impact wrench and string of 1/2" socket extenders.  Being 75 and in very ill health, I'll have to rely on others to handle jacking and servicing.  I'll have to give the impact wrench a try on the next cooler day so that I can get underneath the Buick and fill the transmission; I'm curious to see how well it works.

 

Thx all for your inputs.

 

Pete

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15 hours ago, SC38DLS said:

I’ve got a low profile light weight aluminum floor jack in the 38 Studebaker. Easy to assemble and gives great support. I’ve only used it one time when I got a flat. Actually the two cops that saw me on the side of the road and stopped to help a grey hair old guy with an interesting car actually did the work. They did say it was a good jack for the car. 
 


I carry a Harbor Freight low profile 3 ton aluminum racing jack for changing trailer tires - they make smaller models - personally I would only trust a mechanical jack to change out a tire by the side of the road.

 

Don’t forget a reflective high visibility vest and safety triangles or road flares so you don’t end up in a pine box ⚰️ 

 

 

Jim 

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Posted (edited)

This type of trailer ramp is much safer and faster if you have multi axel trailers. I could even change a tire with the horses in the trailer with no worries about their moving upsetting the jack. 

 

868641643_trailertireramp.jpg.4def61bd345168539a44fedb46a20fb7.jpg

Edited by SC38DLS (see edit history)
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For many years ,I just toss new car jacks right in the trash and the baby lug nut, pry bar,and carry the smallest ,new on sale ,cheapo, 4 wheel hydraulic floor jack available and also carry the the largest X handle lug nut wrench..Older ones are better,as I've twisted and broke 2 newer ones.

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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, SC38DLS said:

I’ve got a low profile light weight aluminum floor jack in the 38 Studebaker. Easy to assemble and gives great support. I’ve only used it one time when I got a flat. Actually the two cops that saw me on the side of the road and stopped to help a grey hair old guy with an interesting car actually did the work. They did say it was a good jack for the car. 
 

 

I also carry the low profile lightweight aluminum floor jack from Harbor Freight, as well as a board to place under it if not on a paved surface.

Last year for Fathers day, the kids got me a top-quality 1/2" drive DeWalt impact wrench, sets of both SAE and Metric deepwell sockets, and ear protection.

Of course I still follow up with my torque wrench.

All that, plus a ramp for trailer wheels makes life safer and a lot earier. It allowed me to help other folks during the recent Founders Tour in West Virginia.

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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20 hours ago, PeteO said:

my aching joints look for relief whenever possible.

As others about the exact circumstances around their roadside incident in detail. I am sure the information will help you take steps where all you need is at least half a tank of fuel and your key. Those whom have gone ahead have shown me the way. One can plan for a non-event.

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22 minutes ago, JACK M said:

Don't you guys know that if you take it with you you wont need it?

Its Murphy's law.

 

 

We carry half our garage to help other folks -

and it seems to work -

... that, plus lots of prep time

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Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, Marty Roth said:

 

We carry half our garage to help other folks -

and it seems to work -

... that, plus lots of prep time

I don’t have big enough cars to fit a half or even quarter of my garage in them, especially on long distance trips when carrying other luggage, etc. 

Does it mean I need bigger cars or smaller garage ? 🤔

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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On 7/8/2021 at 8:56 PM, ted sweet said:

aaa here is terrible. the ow i requested in february was told was on its within 2 hours. 14 hours later the police had to find another tow because i was still on side of road. aaa never about it

Interesting.
I have +/-20 years of “Premier” membership with AAA and have needed/used their  “roadside assistance” 3 times (2 tows and 1 unlocking, all here in California) over the years. On every occasion “assistance” arrived much faster than initially estimated/suggested and once I was even slightly aggravated when the “assistance” (tow service) arrived in 10 or so minutes instead of estimated/expected 2+ hrs, forcing me to quickly gulp down a very nice glass of wine I had just ordered and hoped to leisurely enjoy a 1 or more while I wait. 
I’m not sure whether or not location or membership level influenced prompt services.

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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On 7/8/2021 at 8:56 PM, ted sweet said:

aaa here is terrible. the ow i requested in february was told was on its within 2 hours. 14 hours later the police had to find another tow because i was still on side of road. aaa never about it

My AAA experience here in California matches what @TTR describes: I’ve had to use it only a few times in the last 20 years. In Northern California and, a couple of years ago, here in Southern California. In all cases the AAA operator answered immediately, gave a conservative estimate of the tow truck arrival time, and the tow truck arrived earlier than estimated.

 

The old car isn’t always the subject of attention: Our new(ish) daily driver doesn’t have a spare, just a can of fix-it goop and a 12v compressor. That does nothing when a pot hole damages the sidewall of the tire. Unfortunately, lack of a spare tire of any type seems to be an increasingly common trait on new cars.

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On 7/7/2021 at 5:45 PM, joe_padavano said:

I don't know anything about them, but for $12 you can get a hex drive adapter for a conventional scissor jack that lets you drive it with a battery powered impact wrench. That's probably a better choice, since even if you don't have one now, that impact will probably be very useful.

 

71oBsJP4aAL._AC_SL1200_.jpg

 

Note of caution.  If you use an impact wrench with this type of scissors jack, the jack will only be good for a limited number of cycles.  It is important to keep the screw lubricated with EP/extreme pressure lube to extend the life of the jack.  The screw wears out.

 

I know because I wore out a number of these jacks years ago using an impact years ago.

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On 7/7/2021 at 3:06 PM, PeteO said:

Nope, no hijack, Joe.  I appreciate your input.  My current scissor jack has a very long crank handle with a 1/2 x 1/2 male connector.  Somehow I just haven't given any thought to powering it with a common impact driver.  Can a battery or two put out enough power to lift a Buick?  Its worth a try. Tnx.

My friend has a hip replacement, three vertebrae replaced in his spine, and is getting grey and long in tooth. He also has a 34 foot travel trailer he, and his physically limited wife, love to camp in. His DeWalt battery operated impact driver, and a 13/16” socket, are all he needs to raise and lower all four scissor jacks on his trailer. And, I have not known of him recharging the battery’s over the several decades I know he has used it.

Edited by Jack Bennett (see edit history)
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50 minutes ago, Larry Schramm said:

 

Note of caution.  If you use an impact wrench with this type of scissors jack, the jack will only be good for a limited number of cycles.  It is important to keep the screw lubricated with EP/extreme pressure lube to extend the life of the jack.  The screw wears out.

 

I know because I wore out a number of these jacks years ago using an impact years ago.

 

Considering that this is an emergency use jack for changing a flat on the side of the road, it'll take a lot of flat tires to wear it out. 

Seriously, you bring up a good point, but the issue isn't using an impact wrench, it's turning the screw too fast under load. Most of these electric impacts are "throttleable".

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7 hours ago, Larry Schramm said:

If you use an impact wrench with this type of scissors jack, the jack will only be good for a limited number of cycles. 

I would tend to agree. Smooth steady torque applied to the screw is bound to reduce wear. On the other hand how many times are you going to use it. Probably seldom. 

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