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Cannot start 1950 plymouth in humid weather


Mjh
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Went out to start my 1950 plymouth in humid weather. It's under a carport. I think I flooded it. Ran ok previous day. Any suggestions on how to get it running?

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I had a 1941 Dodge pickup with the same problem: When it rained, the truck would not start. The problem turned out to be a bad coil. Moisture on the coil was enough to cause it to short from the high tension output to the ground lug on the coil. I suggest you check your ignition circuit to see if you have the same or similar problem. Good luck.

 

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Went out to start my 1950 plymouth in humid weather. It's under a carport. I think I flooded it. Ran ok previous day. Any suggestions on how to get it running?

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Pull the spark plugs and clean and dry them if you think you flooded it.  Did it try to start?  Check the quality of your spark from the coil and at the plugs.

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Posted (edited)

CarbKing shared the solution:    Don't pump the gas pedal, just let it turn over a few times, then hit the pedal about 3/4 down while cranking,    Works great for me.  Give it a try.

Edited by Paul Dobbin
spill check (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Roger Walling said:

Spray the ignition with WD 40.

Don't spraying anything inside a distributor that will leave a film on the points. I'd prefer to make sure it is dry inside and possibly use a hairdryer to remove the moisture. 

Try running your car at night in a dark place with the hood up. Look for arcing that would indicate bad insulation or a short circuit. Doing this has helped me cure ignition problems. 

Edited by Fossil (see edit history)
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 If your Plymouth is anything like my 48 Chrysler, it has the spark plug wires going thru a metal tube to shield the radio.

 Plenty of chances for the spark plug wires to short out there.

 Try new wires, and maybe reroute them with spark plug wire stands instead of going thru the shield.( If you don't mind being not period correct)  😮

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1 hour ago, Peter Gariepy said:

MOVE TO AZ? :)

Or Caledonia in a condo made of stone-a. Still dry😜

 

 

Some vehicles just seem to be prone to humid and damp weather starting problems. Check the entire ignition system, and also the fuel system in case this high-volatile garbage gasoline has evaporated out of the carb and fuel pump.

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Looking at the ignition wires of a car running in the dark often helps find the weak spots.  My 64 Plymouth didn’t like dampness either.  Running at night in the garage I found the coil was jumping spark, the tower had a crack that was easy to see at night.

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I would wait until a "less humid" drier day get it to start, and then replace the spark plugs, wires, cap rotor point's and even the coil. Sounds like your Plymouth is in need of a major tune-up. The job sure is easy enough and cheap enough

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Anyone remember the Mopar Evr-Dry rubber insulators for the old flathead engines that were installed on the end of the ignition wires to prevent the spark plugs from getting damp?

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I had a little short wheelbase 50 Plymouth 2dr, in southern NM/Ariz, and it had the moisture problem (it dos get wet there occasionally)...

A mechanic friend gave me some stuff similar to vaseline, but odorless, as I recall,  to coat the insides of the dist cap (not the contacts)...said they were prone to collecting moisture...

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You can buy the Everdry plug wire insulation kits from Andy Bernbaum and other parts suppliers. They were standard equipment on most Mopar engines at one time. The trouble started when lazy mechanics or cheapskates left them off. Some cars had a seam in the middle of the hood that let water drip down right on the plugs, shorting them out when it rained. On later cars, or if the plug wires and boots were maintained properly they never had a problem.

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