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"We don't drive our cars."


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I have a good friend who is very involved with Chrysler Airflows.  He drives his ’36 all over the country as do other Airflow owners.

A few years ago, he was at an Airflow meet where there was also a gathering of HV-12s.  One of the Lincoln owners commented to my friend, “We don’t drive our cars.”  Meaning, we don’t take them on long trips as the Airflow guys do.

 

So do you have any knowledge as to why this Lincoln owner would have said this about HV-12s?  I will be intending on driving my HV-12 on long trips and expect it to be reliable and perform well.  Would there be a reason to think it wouldn’t? I will only be considering a ’41 Zephyr 4-door or a ’47-’48 Continental coupe.

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Drive a Lincoln with the small V-12 and you will know why they don’t drive them. Want to drive a Lincoln? Buy a KB or a late model K. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, 1941 said:

THIS is why I am leaving this forum. TOTAL BULLSHIT. I drive my V12  Daily.

I have driven it  5 years in a row to the Lincoln meet at Gilmore. Round trip total 1200 miles without a problem.

WHY WOULD YOU POST SOMETHING LIKE THIS ????

EDINMASS has Obviously NEVER been to the GILMORE with his car


 

Actually I have been there countless times, since I have served on the board of one of the museums there for decades. I’m also a significant supporter of the museum with my checkbook, have a lifetime membership, and have things on display there in one museum.  Also, I have driven Lincoln’s from 1922 to 1948 extensively. Someone asked about the late model V-12 engine and how it was as a driver. Well, sorry to tell you this, it wasn’t a great engine when new, and it was being replaced with a Caddy V-8 when only a few years old. Fact is they are under powered. Severely underpowered. Yes, I have rebuilt one also. Can they be driven on the open road for long distances reliably? Yes, they can. Do you want to be in one trying to pull hills in the Green and White mountains and try and keep up with other CCCA Classic cars.............no, as you will get left behind. I actually have no problem with them, except the original question was someone asking how they are over the road. 
 

And as for your snide comment.........have I ever driven to the Gilmore in a car, my answer is.........in August 2019 340 miles round trip in heavy rain in one day to the Gilmore. It was in a Model J open car, which ran fine and didn’t have any issues. 


I also drive my 105 year old car daily...........and can tell you for a fact, it’s way faster and probably more reliable the the small V-12 Lincoln. 


I have well over 100,000 miles behind the wheel of cars built in the 1930’s, and driven most of the American Classic Car platforms. So, yes, I do know what I am talking about. Giving an honest opinion of a platform that someone asked about isn’t dumping on the car........it’s just an opinion. He asked, I answered honestly.  
 

PS - I think the Lincoln museum is fabulous, and everyone should see it. Jack Passey was a great guy and a good friend, and last time I was there his Leland Lincoln was on display and quite a treat to look over.

 

One last thought.....Lincoln’s are one of the most under rated cars and least understood. In my humble opinion a KB is one of the best platforms made in the 30’s. And it’s on my must own list.

 

Have a good evening.

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Drive your Lincoln. The more you drive it the more reliable it will be. You cannot find out what is not working correctly unless you use it. There are several members of the LZCO and the LCOC that drive their cars on long tours and there are also the ones that trailer their car so they can enjoy power steering and AC.

 

IMHO drive your Lincoln and enjoy it. Keep it stock and well maintained and it will be fun to drive. It does not drive like a KB or a Pierce-Arrow but is similar in power and handling to other middle to high priced cars that were new at the same time.

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Posted (edited)

Tom, I agree. Unfortunately the comment he posted was off the handle. No one said they weren’t drivable or reliable. Too many internet whimps that get offended by an honest opinion. Such is the world we live in. I drive my T and don’t complain. It’s parked next to a 100 point V-12 Pierce. All cars are fun, their driving envelopes are different.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Tom, I agree. Unfortunately the comment he posted was off the handle. No one said they weren’t drivable or reliable. Too many internet whimps that get offended by an honest opinion. Such is the world we live in. I drive my T and don’t complain. It’s parked next to a 100 point V-12 Pierce. All cars are fun, their driving envelopes are different.

 

Ed,  in fairness you did sort of pee on the smaller V12.    I always liked the early Continental and my dad would warn me that they would always be slowing down the Caravans.   I'm wondering if that was just because they were not sorted properly?   Or maybe the other guys were running hot rods (like my old man).

 

In any event,  the styling on those cars is fantastic,  and if someone is regularly driving them I would love to hear about it. 

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Posted (edited)

Didn’t pee on them, made a fair comment based on actual experience. The displacement is tiny by any measurement.......can’t remember the actual number. They make little horsepower or torque. The entire platform never made engineering sense. Read the book on Ford by Horowitz  and you will understand  what was going on at Ford at the time. It’s probably the only reason the engine got off the drawing board. 
 

PS- Big Al is correct. He usually is........

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Just my personal experience.  After driving a  '41 Lincoln V12, a '41 Caddy and a '41 Packard, I found it hard to believe that all cars were built during the same decade, let alone the same year.

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2 hours ago, mike brady said:

Just my personal experience.  After driving a  '41 Lincoln V12, a '41 Caddy and a '41 Packard, I found it hard to believe that all cars were built during the same decade, let alone the same year.


 

Yes, I agree. A fair and accurate observation. 👍

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  • 5 weeks later...

ok boys, the forum is for helping others and giving opinions.....right or indecisive. each car is different and each of our abilities is different. i just sold my 47 lincoln zephyr club coupe today and .........opinions come from OUR EXPERANCES.

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i don't know why you don't drive your old V12, but they are fun to drive. some day you might hear about the story of "old blue" there was a v12 that went every place and was even stolen. the story is in a old copy of TWOTZ. it was his only car and drove it all over creation. so how much you drive it depends on you. If you don't use it the seals dry up and leak. if you break down on the road look in the book some one might be right around the corner. cars like boats need to be used to keep them in shape. this is my experience opinion.

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