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‘32 Buick 57S


valk
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A good friend of mine has a magnificent ‘32 57S for sale with an interesting history. Bought by his father over 40 years ago, it was maticulously restored to concours condition over 30 years, now a total restoration with a few hundred miles on it, maybe.  It has been stored and not driven for a couple years, hence the yellowed tires and dusty body. I would be very surprised if there was a better one on earth. Last pic shows a reflection in the paint. What do you think it’s worth? 

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I am new to the Pre War Buick stuff so I would not be the one to ask from the collector value. I have always valued vehicles first by price paid divided by potential miles driven. This is where the collector value comes in because some of the best restored vehicles are not driven much and those that buy them certainly don't plan on driving the wheels off.

My Buick is no where near the quality restoration as this 57 but I plan on driving the wheels off mine. Some buy new 100k cars and drive them 20k miles then sell them for half. That's $2.50 a mile. I plan on getting my investment out by miles driven. If i get 30k miles out of mine and junk it for $0 I'll be fine. If someone buys it , it will all be gravy.

Back to the 57. I think folks are going to have to just start driving them and getting that value. Then after getting about half the investment money in miles you don't feel so bad about selling in today's softer market. Hopefully by the time you rack up 40k miles on it the market will be stronger. Best of luck. Sorry I did not have a number value.

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After some research, surprisingly and sadly, it seems the very best restored cars only fetch $50K, if that. Many good driver quality cars, barely half that. These are relative steals in my opinion as they are cool, spacious, elegant, powerful cars. 

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3 minutes ago, valk said:

10 to 14?? You must not like Buick’s much! 


I like Buick’s.  This is a nice car. I’m guessing what I think you can sell it for.  Some of the Buick guys may jump in and know better.

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It's a nice looking car.  The 50 series were the low end of the spectrum in 1932.  There were 9,766  57S models built in 1932, (a relatively high number).

To be considered a concourse restoration,  all details must be exacting in correctness and condition.  From the few photos posted,  I noticed that it lacks pinstriping,  The black painted trim rings on the hubcaps are missing. The front and rear upholstery appear different colors (may be  photo color fidelity.  

It would be a good AACA senior award car.  

In my estimation from the few photos and with no photos of the engine compartment, I would consider the price range to be $10,000 to $15,000.  

A scarce model or large series car with low production numbers would fetch a much higher amount.  

 

Bob Engle

 

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I'm newer to pre war Era and I'm surprised how low these go for.  But I have noticed car prices going up and things similar in my area are going for closer to 20k at the moment.  

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There is almost zero correlation between the amount of money you can pour in to a car and what you can resell it for.   Another rule is that it costs the same amount of money (approximately) to restore the lower end series of a car than the higher end series.   If this was a Series 90,  it would be worth 2 or 3 times more,  but the restoration costs would be similar.

 

Don't feel bad,  I've been doing this for 50 years and I'm always shocked at how little I can sell my stuff for.

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I’m a little confused in that my research indicates folks are asking a lot more than this for these cars, remains to be seen if they get what they are asking. This is a friend so I want him to get a decent price for it, particularly given what’s gone into this car. On the other hand, if this is the way it is, I’d buy it and be incredibly happy. Thanks again

peter

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In the end result, it comes down to a willing buyer and a willing seller.  It's a tough business to buy antique cars and expect to sell them for a profit.  Some people see a car and fall in love with it and are willing to pay what's needed to own the car.  The other thing to remember, almost any car, except one off a quality restoration  will require some $ to get it into a good running condition.  New tires, tubes and flaps for the 57S will cost $1,500.  

 

Bob Engle

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It looks like a $50k car to me, especially given how much has been spent on its restoration. I know it’s a base model but you wouldn’t know it looking at it. 6939E6A8-DD99-42CC-95CC-892FF1FCEDAC.jpeg.a28e1c877f374adc74be9a9cafeacb02.jpeg05845C2C-0851-4CDB-A1CC-5DC41B481635.jpeg.9c127919162060a7ea210526b3c057a4.jpegE2CE045D-39B4-43D2-B0FC-EF8CC1B221FD.jpeg.cab530e511a2c006ca71173f8a9a738f.jpeg

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I bet I could list it for $24,900 and get it sold for $22-ish. I just sold a '33 Chevy sedan in similar condition for about that much and had multiple suitors. The Buick is far more car albeit with a far smaller potential customer base.

 

It is nonetheless quite lovely.

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5 hours ago, Robert Engle said:

In the end result, it comes down to a willing buyer and a willing seller.  It's a tough business to buy antique cars and expect to sell them for a profit.  Some people see a car and fall in love with it and are willing to pay what's needed to own the car.  The other thing to remember, almost any car, except one off a quality restoration  will require some $ to get it into a good running condition.  New tires, tubes and flaps for the 57S will cost $1,500.  

 

Bob Engle

These tire prices are silly when you realize you will throw them away before you wear down 1/32 of tread. No way I was going spend that just to hold something off the rims. I'm rolling on Lexus RX350 spares. They don't have the same outside diameter but everything else works fine. AND 4 for 90 bucks. I spent more on the tubes.

Tony

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The more photos I see, the more I can see the quality of the restoration. The Sandoz clock is a $500 to $700 value.  That being said, If anyone plans to show the car, There will be a lot of work to get many things correct.  I'm not trying to degrade the car,  but it will most likely not get a senior AACA award.  From the engine bay, I see several zirk fittings that were not correct for 1932.  Most likely the undercarriage will have the same issue.  I see a spiral loc clamped rubber hose to the fuel pump'  This would have been a compression fitting brass line.  The same for the for the oil filter hoses. These also would have brass fittings and tubing  These upgrades make it easier to maintain, but they will take points away on a judged car.

 

It will come down to what the buyer wants with the car and is willing to pay for.

 

Bob Engle

 

 

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2 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

I bet I could list it for $24,900 and get it sold for $22-ish. I just sold a '33 Chevy sedan in similar condition for about that much and had multiple suitors. The Buick is far more car albeit with a far smaller potential customer base.

 

It is nonetheless quite lovely.

 

 

You would know better than I.   Will a private seller be able to duplicate your asking price?

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2 hours ago, valk said:

It looks like a $50k car to me, especially given how much has been spent on its restoration. I know it’s a base model but you wouldn’t know it looking at it.

 

 

You could try listing for 50k and see what happens,  but I would be shocked if it sold for anywhere near that.

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