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My Great Grandparents 1936 Oldsmobile and gas station


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This gas station picture was taken in the late 30's and the car picture was in 36 when the car was new. This station was in Indianapolis. The city forced them to sell the gas station and the 1000 acre farm on eminent domain sometime back then. Sadly, this car did not make it to my generation. My Grandfather does not remember when his dad let it go but did say they took it from Indianapolis to California and back and to the Smoky Mountains in the early 40's. My Grandfather is 91 and remembers this car and tells stories about it like it was yesterday. 

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Neat photo, thanks for posting. Look at the signs. What is boiling beef? New to me........sounds like a cow’s...

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I am guessing (educated guess) that 'boiling' beef is the low end old cow, tough as a rock, and needs to be boiled for hours to make it marginally chewable.

Someone should ask about my great-grandmother's recipe for old chicken.

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Beef for beef stew or soup as Wayne says, cooked in hot water for hours.  At home we had beef and noodles like this, sort of a watery beef noodle soup with other vegetables tossed in.  It had to be a left over from the depression recipe.

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

Neat photo, thanks for posting. Look at the signs. What is boiling beef? New to me........sounds like a cow’s...

Stew beef. A tough cheap cut that had to be simmered a long time to break it down so you could chew it.

 

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6 minutes ago, GregLaR said:

I don't know which is worse, eminent domain takeovers or having a new freeway built 4 miles away, turning all these great little towns into "used to be's".

Thought the same thing. Eric, what did the city build on your family's land?

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56 minutes ago, wayne sheldon said:

Someone should ask about my great-grandmother's recipe for old chicken.

Tell it! 🐓😺

 

Story goes that my Uncle Edd's 1941 Ford Super Duper Double Deluxe Pea Green Coupe had been freshly washed and "Simonized" when me Grandpa's old rooster saw his reflection in the door and fought with it. The old rooster's spurs cut the Ford's paint to the metal. 

 

There was chicken and dumplings on the table that night. In other words Edd took care of the problem.🔪

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49 minutes ago, rocketraider said:

Thought the same thing. Eric, what did the city build on your family's land?

If you look up Moller Road in Indianapolis, all the land around that entire road. My great grandmother's maiden name was Moller and they named the road after her. Her family and my Great Grandfather's family immigrated here from Denmark together. My Grandfather is the little boy on the left and the one on the right is my uncle. 

 

When they moved they come to Brazil/Poland Indiana area and started a new store out in the country. It ran till sometime in the 50's I believe. Closed when my Great Grandparents passed away. The foundation to the old store in the country is still there. If not for the eminent domain then I would not be here because my grandfather would not have met my grandmother. Funny how that works

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My grandfather said that for a few years they lived a block from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and him and his friends knew secret ways to get in the track. He said they would sneak in and watch the race from the infield. I guess there was some kind of bridge that went over the track on the back stretch and watched from that bridge one time. 

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1 hour ago, rocketraider said:

Tell it! 🐓😺

 

My dad was born in 1929. As if the crash and depression wasn't bad enough, his mother took ill before he could walk. His father was a part-time ranch worker, and in no way able to raise a baby on his own. So his mother's parents, his grandparents, took him in. The marriage had not been approved, and there was a great deal of resentment between his father and his mother's parents. So his father was not allowed to be much a part of my dad's young life.

Being raised by his grandparents, my dad's young life was pretty good. They had worked very hard for many years, and had a small cattle ranch in North-Eastern Nevada. They worked very hard, and he never really wanted for anything. Although the depression didn't hurt them very much, they had had some very hard times for many years before. And his grandparents still knew hardship.

My dad's grandfather died when my dad was in high school, but his grandmother lived another twenty years. So, I got to know her fairly well myself. My dad loved to tell the story, the recipe, often! But I did hear it directly from my great-grandmother!

 

When the old rooster gets too old to crow, he is no longer worth the grain he eats. Time to put him to his last good use. Wring his neck, pluck him, gut him, and trim him.

Get five gallon boiling stockpot from pantry, place on stove. Place prepared bird in bottom. Go into yard, select an eight to ten pound rock, rinse and place on top of bird to keep it from floating. Add water to about three inches below rim of stockpot. Start roaring fire in stove. After a couple hours, add water to bring back up to three inches of top of stockpot. Reduce flame to slow boil, and continue adding water as needed. 

Next morning, add carrots, potatoes, any other available vegetables, salt, pepper, a pinch of this and a pinch of that. Continue adding water as needed.

Next morning, add more vegetables, and a bit more salt. Continue adding water

After two more days, remove from stove. Throw bird away, and eat the rock.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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