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Classic car emissions in the UK.


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Nope. The dreaded MOT has always been an issue. When we lived in Scotland our 1935 Morris had to pass. Fortunately. the rules were applicable to items that were originally supplied at the time the car was built, with just a few exceptions that really were not a problem. So, a vehicle like ours with old fashioned trafficators for turn signals was ok. Earlier cars with gas and kerosene lamps could still pass since that was their original equipment. Emissions however are another ball of wax!

Terry

Edited by Terry Bond (see edit history)
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Just for thought, what would the cradle to grave carbon footprint of 40,000 manufacturing jobs be in tonnes byproduct?  I am figuring that would be annually into perpetuity.

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2 hours ago, Terry Bond said:

Nope. The dreaded MOT has always been an issue. When we lived in Scotland our 1935 Morris had to pass. Fortunately. the rules were applicable to items that were originally supplied at the time the car was built, with just a few exceptions that really were not a problem. So, a vehicle like ours with old fashioned trafficators for turn signals was ok. Earlier cars with gas and kerosene lamps could still pass since that was their original equipment. Emissions however are another ball of wax!

Terry

Sorry Terry I should have looked it up first. Here goes;

As of May 20, 2018, nearly all cars that were built more than 40 years ago are exempt from the annual MOT roadworthiness test, unless owners voluntarily elect to have their vehicle checked. Previously, only cars first registered before 1960 were exempt from needing an MOT.

The change also means that MOTs are brought into line with road tax (VED), where classic cars 40 years and over are also exempt.

Here’s everything you need to know…

Which classic cars are not exempt?

As always, the devil is in the detail and there are exceptions. The main one is that the 40-year rule does not apply if a vehicle has been substantially changed in the past 30 years (eg chassis and engines changes). If in doubt, read the full guidelines.

My car was first registered in 1980? When will it become MOT exempt?

The good news is that the 40-year rule rolls so that if your car was first registered on 1 September 1981, for instance, you won't need an MOT after September 1, 2021, and so on…

Does the MOT change also affect classic motorcycles?

Yes, cars, vans, motorcycles and other light passenger vehicles don’t need to have an MOT if they’re over 40 years old and have not been substantially changed in the previous 30 years.

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2 hours ago, Pfeil said:

Sorry Terry I should have looked it up first. Here goes;

As of May 20, 2018, nearly all cars that were built more than 40 years ago are exempt from the annual MOT roadworthiness test, unless owners voluntarily elect to have their vehicle checked. Previously, only cars first registered before 1960 were exempt from needing an MOT.

The change also means that MOTs are brought into line with road tax (VED), where classic cars 40 years and over are also exempt.

Here’s everything you need to know…

Which classic cars are not exempt?

As always, the devil is in the detail and there are exceptions. The main one is that the 40-year rule does not apply if a vehicle has been substantially changed in the past 30 years (eg chassis and engines changes). If in doubt, read the full guidelines.

My car was first registered in 1980? When will it become MOT exempt?

The good news is that the 40-year rule rolls so that if your car was first registered on 1 September 1981, for instance, you won't need an MOT after September 1, 2021, and so on…

Does the MOT change also affect classic motorcycles?

Yes, cars, vans, motorcycles and other light passenger vehicles don’t need to have an MOT if they’re over 40 years old and have not been substantially changed in the previous 30 years.

Yup, the changes were implemented long after we had move back to the USA, but I'm wondering if the emissions stuff is treated separately from the MOT, which has always been the equivalent of what we call a "safety inspection" here.

Terry

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Most of the above is good news for us classic car enthusiasts, however when selling your car many prospective buyers ask for a MOT , which is not always practical or cost effective, if unnecessary 

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