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Turn Signals on the '49 Roadmaster


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Turn signals on most autos are on the left side of the steering wheel.  This is the only car I own that has them on the right side and is rather confusing for me.  I don't want to get into an accident because I gave someone the wrong signal.  My question is: has anyone reversed the position of the turn signal arm?  If they have, perhaps they can save me a lot of time & effort.

If I mount it on the left side, the left turn would be down as with most autos. Thus no wiring would have to be changed.  I hope someone can answer me on this one.  One might have to drill some new holes etc perhaps. Hoping to hear from someone on this before I try pulling the steering wheel off.

Lee

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1960's and '70s BMWs are like that too.  It makes sense if you are reaching for a stick shift with your right hand to down-shift into a turn.  You will get used to it.  Never seen it reversed.

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Hello, never heard of anyone changing it over either, it’s part of the Buick that makes it a 49 Buick. You could put an add on type of turn signal but as previous post says you get used to it.It makes sense that they were on right side with column standard shift , left hand is always on the wheel, Buick are like that from 1939 .

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With my 1949 Super, I just got used to it. However, my car has a manual transmission. So it is actually very intuitive to have the signal arm near the shifter arm. Fortunately, the signal arm is self-cancelling. On my 1939 Roadmaster, the signal switch is mounted on top of the shifter arm and is not self-cancelling. By 1940, Buick moved the signal actuator to the separate signal arm and it became self-cancelling.

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Hello again, I had a 39 Roadmaster the signals were only on the deck lid BUICK EIGHT emblem and control was mounted on the gear shift lever .Getting back to the add on signal would probably be the best option as it could be removed if wish to go back to the original.

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I suspect it was an evolutionary thing. Put the switch on top of the gear shifter arm in 1939. Move it to a separate arm near the gear shifter arm in 1940. Move it to a separate arm on the left side in the early 1950s when Dynaflow took over and there was much less need to shift and also to eliminate conflicts between the two arms.

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Since I am sure I will not get used to this as I don't drive the '49 very often and since no one else has done this, I guess I will be the first one.  Keeping the car original but safety is another issue. One must balance the two. 

Will let you know of my progress. Thanks/Lee

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