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Is this a Studebaker?


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Is the car in this photo a Studebaker?  I have scoured the Internet trying to identify the year, make, and model of this car and the closest I've come is that it might be a Studebaker, possibly 1915-1918.  However, the SHAPE OF THE WINDOW in the rear curtain is like nothing I've found on any cars I've seen anywhere on the Internet.  The markers I'm using which makes me think it might be a Studebaker are:  1)  the suspension springs extending out the back on either side of the spare tire,  2)  the 'V' shape of the bracing for the convertible top, 3)  the manner in which the rear fender drops sharply, straight down onto the side step, 4)  the shape/design of the convertible top, 5)  the framing of the front windshield, 6)  the rounded shape of the headlights, 7)  the spokes and shape of the hubs on the tires.  The shape of the window in the rear curtain is the only marker that doesn't match anything I've found.

img654.jpg

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Thank you, OldCarFudd.  I did not find it among the Chandlers and Clevelands, but your lead revealed another tangent.  It took me to a photo of a McLaughlin-Buick, the window of which is almost the same, but just a little more long and flat.  The McLaughlin-Buick also looks much like the car in my photo, which gives me hope.  Unfortunately, I am striking out on finding very many historical photos of 1915-1919 McLaughlin-Buick touring cars to view different models which might have the same window.

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I am almost certain it is not a Studebaker. Fender edges and a few other minor details aren't right for them.

I can't be sure at all, I just don't have ready access to enough good pictures of Chandler automobiles, and I have looked through google before. However, I think there is a fair chance that it is a Chandler. The angle of the photo distorts the rear lite (window) enough to not be clear, but the shape is very similar to the one SOME Chandlers had in the mid 1910s to mid 1920s. I did a quick look in the Kimes and Clark Catalog of American cars, but that particular model/style was not shown. The closest to it, was a circa 1918 touring car on which the top sockets/bows were substantially different.

However, another key detail in the OP photo above is the ten spoke front wheels. That was an unusual feature throughout most of the 1910s to mid 1920s. Cadillac was one of the few major marques that used ten spoke front wheels, and this car is clearly NOT a Cadillac! Looking in the Kimes and Clark book  at Chandler, they did also have ten spoke front wheels on several of their late 1910s models.

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Posted (edited)

Thank you, Wayne Sheldon.  That was very helpful.  I will do some more searching of the Chandler models; I may have missed something.  I really appreciate your experienced eye on this matter.

 

Edited by KimRowe (see edit history)
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Learned something today. V in the rear window for Velie. The rear window clearly identifies it now. I thought what I was seeing in the rear window was part of the top irons.

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