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Fender mount turn signal indicators on a 68 Newport


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Does the owners manual mention anything about them?  For some reason I seem to think they were like an early version of an LED style light.

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The Buicks/Cadillacs (1980s) were not LED, they were fiber optic from the closest light source. I.e. the light pipe (fiber optic) ran from the front turn signal bulb to the fender unit, from the low bean to the fender unit and from the high beam to the fender unit. The door lock lights were also fiber optic from a bulb hiding inside the door!

 

I thought the Chrysler version was just one color (amber) and had a bulb in it. The GMs were three colors, for low, high and turn.

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It is, same as Ford's as used on 60s Thunderbird. Neat little styling gadget that has the added advantage of letting a driver know "hey stoopit, yer blinker's still on!" (dash indicator and flasher tink-tinking apparently are not enough for some folks 😼).

 

GM had the fiberoptic lamp monitor at least by 1968, maybe 1967, on Buick and Chevrolet. It also incorporated an indicator on the package shelf for the rear lamps.

 

I don't recall seeing it on Oldsmobile or Pontiac before the late 70s, though Olds offered an ELMS (electronic lamp monitoring system) starting 1971-72. The fiberoptic was simpler and gave better indication of what the lamps were doing. ELMS just flashed a warning lamp on the dash to let you know a rear bulb was misbehaving but not which one. And if its little trunk-mounted circuit board had a fit, well, the dash warning lamp would stay on all the time. Ended up pulling the bulb out on my 73 Delta convertible.

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I have a couple of sets of these that I keep around for fun.

I have looked at that tiny bulb in wonder, couldn't tell you where to find one. But their are bulb specialists out there.

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😳 Wow. Those look like the 367 and 387 lamps we used in a lot of powerplant indicator lamps, but I thought they were higher voltage than 12v.

 

I had the nickname "Bulbinator" because I made it a priority (ok, a mission) to keep indicator lamps functional on all inside and outside equipment. Couldn't stand burned out indicator lamps... I think one of my proteges is continuing that tradition!😺

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Midget Flange Base bulb. Wide voltage range available (or was). Used in military equipment dial lighting back in the day also.

 

https://www.bulbtown.com/S_C_Midget_Flanged_Base_SX6s_s/760.htm

 

I agree, indicator bulbs need to work! Well, maybe not those pesky Check Engine lamps. Ha!🤣

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