Jump to content

Making a Map for a Club Driving Tour


Recommended Posts

Hello all,

I have to create a set of driving directions for a 100 mile round trip driving tour and would like to know if anyone has found or developed a good procedure to create a friendly and easily readable map for the navigator of an antique car.

 

Thank you all in advance.

Dan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Run the route yourself and include any info that would be helpful, especially any tricky parts, cautions, or potential safety hazards. Don't forget to include phone numbers to use in emergencies or if breakdowns occur. 

Terry

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Instead of a map, I suggest a method that has been used on many AACA tours that I have attended and hosted. Using Microsoft Publisher, you produce a tour book with turn by turn instructions with diagrams of each intersection, and text instructions for what to do, i.e., "turn left", "turn right","go straight",  similar to a printed GPS screen for each intersection. The format calls for mileage between each intersection as well as cumulative mileage. A number of years ago, another (now deceased) AACA member, Judy Edwards, shared her CD with logos, diagrams, etc, and I have since shared a copy of the data with others who were planning a tour. If you are interested, send me a PM with your address and I can arrange to mail you a CD copy, share it via dropbox, or hand deliver it to you at the AACA Annual Convention next week if you are going. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

5 minutes ago, Mark Huston said:

I print out a Google map, highlight the route, and then include detailed written instructions with any issues the tour participants need to know.   

 

Agreeing with Matt above:

On tours I have arranged, the actual map may not be

necessary, but it is just for a general indication of where

the cars will be heading.  Highlighting the route gives

participants general knowledge, but isn't for actual

navigating.

 

The written directions, turn by turn, have the mileage

from one point to the next, and also the cumulative

mileage from the beginning of the tour.  These must be

detailed and clear so that people won't miss any turns.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How many cars? I have put driving tours together a few times, and the biggest problems were bathroom breaks and left hand turns. It is important to remind everyone to fill up with fuel the day before. Land marks are essential.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

After a lifetime of writing tours for our antique car club, I seldom use a map.   Well written instructions with distances

between turn instructions are more efficient than maps.   I also find a lot of folks don't even read the instructions.

Why?   Because they want to see the scenry and perfer to follow the leader.   Problem is if they guy in front of you

makes a wrong turn, you are both lost. 

Tell your tourists they are responsibile for the car behind them.   Wait at each turn until the car behind you catches you 

before you complete the turn.   You will feel like you are towing them, but it gets everybody thru.   Google maps have

caused more mistakes than they avoid when using all back roads.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Paul,

I have been on a few tours and noticed that the new guy seems to end up in front of the train. 

Since now if us will be from the Lincoln area I want the instructions to be very clear.  My wife and I went out there from Ohio in April and drove the route and a friend Lincoln has been helpful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The turn by turn book makes sense but you need to run the route at least twice.  Once to create the instructions and once to confirm it.  It takes a driver and a stenographer.

 

Run the route on the same day and time as the tour if possible.

 

Beware construction, traffic, inappropriate speeds, etc.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A cell phone contact list of all the cars on tour is great and distribute it to all participants, also make sure that the last car in the group knows the route. I also like to have the phone number of a few towing contractors, just in case. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Al.  Mary took a lot of notes when we were out there in April.  With all of the tips from the guys on this post and the flat straight roads of Nebraska we should be OK.

I will work on a turn by turn book.

 

Dan

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, alsancle said:

The turn by turn book makes sense but you need to run the route at least twice.  Once to create the instructions and once to confirm it.  It takes a driver and a stenographer.

 

Run the route on the same day and time as the tour if possible.

 

Beware construction, traffic, inappropriate speeds, etc.

Typically, I run the route once to make all of my notes, create my draft tour book, run it again myself to check it, and then give the book to someone who is not a local and have them run the route to confirm that they can follow the instructions without error (or provide notes on any places where they had problems understanding or following the directions) and then the book it ready to print. The day before the tour, if possible, have someone run the route again to make sure there are no last minute route changes to be made due to unplanned road construction, bridge closures or other unexpected complications.  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Matt,

Good advise.  We will be out there two days before anyone else arrives and will use the book.  I like the idea of the binder in the event we have to make revisions.  My friend out there has his eye out for construction.  Already been notified of a bridge closure in the route we drove in April.

Just thinking about it, I can send a copy to him to run.

Dan

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

You have received good advice. Especially:

 

1. Have someone unfamiliar with the route follow the instructions.

2. Run the route just before the tour to note changes to route. I've seen rally instructions have to change hours before the event!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Somehow this reminds me of a trip into the North Maine woods many years back. About 1:00 am we found ourselves in a cutting at the end of a logging road somewhere north east of Chamberlain Lake. The roads can and do indeed shift around from year to year depending upon the cutting activity and location. To add to that there are mile markers on the main roads but you have to know where they start - i.e. some other road, township or border crossing, etc. Cell phones and GPS are useless. There was a gentleman there with a logging truck who was none too pleased to see us but after a fashion kindly gave us directions in very broken English, nearly obscured by his heavy Qubecoise accent. The gist of which ran something like this: "Go go by where I dumped the logs last year - but they not there. Then past where the skidder got stuck... but it's not there. Then take a right where Joe cut... but he's not there........" and so it went....... all to get us a quarter mile out past the gate that marked his cutting area. 

 

Have fun with the tour!

 

 

 

 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a humorous note--showing how important 

good directions are!  We had quite a number of

cars get lost at this intersection.  Note the sign,

showing the intersection of Kralltown Road with

Kralltown Road!

 

 

Car club 2017 Fall Tour (3).JPG

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A lot of wonderful advice above! I would like to reiterate and verbally illustrate that having someone not familiar with the roads follow the directions.

About twenty years ago, I went on a club tour that had made a wonderful book with all the directions and distances clearly written in good order, and easy to read. Even someone driving alone could handle the book and read it. Except for one detail. The tour planner/leader had written the book along with his helpers. Then they went out, three of them! One at a time, all following the book. Each and every one of them followed the directions, except that, since they all knew the road, when they read down to where it said "Turn left at ****** Road", their brains saw "Turn right -----------", because they KNEW the road, KNEW it was a right turn, all three of them missed the error!

 

When we pulled up, there were about six cars, drivers, and passengers scattered for about a block trying to figure it out! A consensus of opinion decided the book was in error, and that a right turn was required. Everybody found their way and a wonderful good time was had by all! Along with repeated "mea culpas" by the tour leader, and a bit of good natured ribbing at the finish.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Another tip:  Don't go a very long distance in one step.

People may lose track and miss a turn, or lose confidence

that they haven't missed the turn.  Instead, break

a long streak into pieces, and note some markers along the way

to give people confidence they're still on the right route.

 

NOT GOOD:  "Go straight 9.5 miles, turn left onto Smith Road."

 

BETTER:  "Go straight on Yorktown Road (Route 12) 4.5 miles to stop sign at Jones Road.

  Continue straight on Yorktown Road (Route 12) 5.0 miles.

  Turn left onto Smith Road (no stop sign).  Note large green barn at intersection."

-------------

NOT GOOD:  "Proceed through town.  Go 5 stoplights and turn right."

 

BETTER:  "Enter the town of Gainsborough.  Go 0.8 mile to stop sign at Adams Way.  Continue straight.  Street name changes to Main St.

   Go 0.5 mile to stop sign at Peterson Street.  Continue straight on Main Street.

   Go 0.4 mile to traffic light at Indiana Avenue.  Continue straight on Main Street..."

   Go 0.3 mile and turn right (no stop sign) onto Columbia Street.  Note Elmsfield Dairy at corner." 

 

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another tip:

At the very end of the tour, after the final sights,

make sure the tourists know how to get back to

a main road or known place for their trips home.

 

So many of our tours take people on miles of remote roads,

wending and winding through woods and countryside.

The drivers really have no sense of where they are.

Then, when the tour ends, it's simply, "Thanks for 

coming everyone.  Have a good trip home!"

 

A few printed steps providing directions for the END of the

tour are very helpful.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you to all with the great tips. As I said before, I am glad I thought to ask the question.

I can see that making directions is a skill and requires thought and consideration for those folks using them.

I will do my best to do a great job and hope I do not loose anyone or the entire group as small as it is.

I can see the value of a fresh set of eyes testing the route book.  

 

Dan

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All the advice is spot on.   I've done this once with a friend when we mapped a tour north of San Antonio.   It was a 4 day event and about 150 miles a day.   Stops for coffee, lunch, and interest along the way.   A HUGE amount of work.      He mapped the routes for the day,   we ran them - realized the issues,  and made updates.    He had to fly back again with another friends a few weeks later and run the route again.   Dealing with traffic patterns and construction were the biggest problems we had.      Also, sometimes things don't seem as clear as you would think.

 

If you are only doing 100 mile one day thing,  then theoretically it should be a lot less work than what I was involved in.

 

A final piece of advice,  which we did not do is to run the route with the same type of car that will be touring.  

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had  a club member called "Wrong Way Bob", who was great at writing tours but lacking on Lefts & Rights.

Made for some great stories over the last 50 years.   Remember, it's right where the red barn use to be.  Right?

If you plan the tour in a modern car, SLOW DOWN!    Early vehicles take a lot longer accelerating and slowing

down while a line of old cars is much slower than new traffic.

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Paul Dobbin said:

We had  a club member called "Wrong Way Bob", who was great at writing tours but lacking on Lefts & Rights.

Made for some great stories over the last 50 years.   Remember, it's right where the red barn use to be.  Right?

If you plan the tour in a modern car, SLOW DOWN!    Early vehicles take a lot longer accelerating and slowing

down while a line of old cars is much slower than new traffic.

 

There is one in every club!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You need to make a final run of the route a day or two before the tour as well.  A friend of mine ran a tour where the city tore up the road the day before the tour and there was a complicated detour which confused people.   And remember the Stutz Club tour of 2007.  We were supposed to visit that waterfall in the National Park and the park management decided to move a historic home that day - right through the parking lot we were supposed to park in.          

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, K8096 said:

You need to make a final run of the route a day or two before the tour as well.  A friend of mine ran a tour where the city tore up the road the day before the tour and there was a complicated detour which confused people.   And remember the Stutz Club tour of 2007.  We were supposed to visit that waterfall in the National Park and the park management decided to move a historic home that day - right through the parking lot we were supposed to park in.          

 

Road construction popping up is the biggest risk I think.     Depending on the state you can probably call the road department and ask about the schedule for the roads you are going to use.

 

I wouldn't have thought about a house move being a risk.    Imagine getting stuck behind the Spruce Goose when they moved that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, alsancle said:

Imagine getting stuck behind the Spruce Goose when they moved that.

 

Mostly by water.

The museum is maybe 8 or 10 miles from the Willamette River. We took the boat out and followed it for a ways, The road trip must not have been to bad as I never heard about any traffic difficulties.

 

By the way the term "Spruce Goose" is offensive to people that respect its history.

It is the H-K1 or the H4 depending on the time frame you are referring to.

Originally designated HK-1 for the first aircraft built by Hughes-Kaiser, the giant was re-designated H-4 when Henry Kaiser withdrew from the project in 1944.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, JACK M said:

 

Mostly by water.

The museum is maybe 8 or 10 miles from the Willamette River. We took the boat out and followed it for a ways, The road trip must not have been to bad as I never heard about any traffic difficulties.

 

By the way the term "Spruce Goose" is offensive to people that respect its history.

It is the H-K1 or the H4 depending on the time frame you are referring to.

Originally designated HK-1 for the first aircraft built by Hughes-Kaiser, the giant was re-designated H-4 when Henry Kaiser withdrew from the project in 1944.

 

I was talking about the first time.   If I called it the Hercules flying boat nobody would have got the reference.

Transporting-the-wings-of-Howard-Hughes%u2019-Spruce-Goose-to-Long-Beach-June-11-1946.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

25 minutes ago, alsancle said:

If I called it the Hercules flying boat nobody would have got the reference.

Unfortunately true.

That is a great shot.

Obviously not Oregon and not present.

My dad was a flyer and hated the SG reference.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All great points, try to put the slowest car in front, consider breaking into two sections if you have more than 12 cars and in the daylight, , consider keeping your headlights off in order to use them as a signal to the car in front of you, that you all need to pull over if someone has been separated behind you.  Stay maybe about a telephone pole distance apart so you don’t get too stretched out. Again - a cellphone contact on your directions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.kaleyann.com/create-custom-travel-map/

https://roamingtheamericas.com/guide-google-my-maps-trip-planning/

https://www.livelikeitstheweekend.com/google-maps-trip-planner/

 

With Google MyMaps you can create the map virtually, then share a link to it to the participants who can then use it on their phones.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Paul Dobbin said:

We had  a club member called "Wrong Way Bob"

 

12 hours ago, John348 said:

There is one in every club!

 

Fifty years ago, the one in our model T club was Al Whitaker! My first model T club tour with my first model T, at least three people warned me to NOT follow Al Whitaker! Truly, he was an old country boy pushing near 70 years young, and loved by everybody in the club! But on tours, he had a habit of just wandering off on his own, and sometimes other people would follow him!

 

Sorry for the drift. But I am glad I got to know Al, and I think Al would get a big kick out of being remembered still today.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...